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Re: [Czechlist] Re: Term: private company limited by its shares

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  • Matej Klimes
    Hmm, interesting.. so limited by its shares might mean something like ruceni je omezeno do vyse zakladniho jmeni (= all shares??) That s exactly what s.r.o.
    Message 1 of 6 , Jan 6, 2009
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      Hmm, interesting..

      so limited by its shares might mean something like "ruceni je omezeno do vyse zakladniho jmeni" (= all shares??) That's exactly what s.r.o. is..


      This one has share capital (of GBP 1000)

      ... and 1000 shares of GBP 1 each

      .. all held by a single subject (a joint-stock company listed on LSE)

      does this still make it an ordinary limited company??

      I'm inclined to translate anything to do with shares as "[obchodni] podil" and share capital as zakladni kapital to avoid association with an akciovka (in Czech). in this MoA, the shares are subscribed(!), but not on a stock exchange..

      Spolecenska smlouva (MoA) of a Czech s.r.o. also talks about podily, spolecnici or podilnici etc. and what you put in the bank is zakladni jmeni...

      Any further thoughts?

      M


      ----- Original Message -----
      From: Simon Vollam
      To: Czechlist@yahoogroups.com
      Sent: Tuesday, January 06, 2009 10:26 AM
      Subject: [Czechlist] Re: Term: private company limited by its shares



      > The name of the company is XXX limited, its memorandum of
      association says it is a "private company limited by its shares"

      Just for info, according my Company Law textbook this is the standard
      MoA formulation for the vast majority of limited liability companies
      in the UK. Some companies are instead "limited by guarantee", but such
      companies are usually formed for educational or charitable purposes
      and not for trading purposes.

      Not sure how to translate it though.

      Simon





      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • Simon Vollam
      ... spolecnici or podilnici etc. and what you put in the bank is zakladni jmeni... In terms of legal form it s clearly the broad equivalent of an s.r.o., so it
      Message 2 of 6 , Jan 6, 2009
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        > Spolecenska smlouva (MoA) of a Czech s.r.o. also talks about podily,
        spolecnici or podilnici etc. and what you put in the bank is zakladni
        jmeni...

        In terms of legal form it's clearly the broad equivalent of an s.r.o.,
        so it makes sense to me to use the same general terminology. That the
        company itself is not an s.r.o. under Czech law should be clear enough
        from the context.

        I'm no lawyer, mind.

        Simon
      • Matej Klimes
        Yeah, I m translating the MoA of an UK limited company for the purpose of it applying for a CZ online betting license, so I guess I should treat it as
        Message 3 of 6 , Jan 6, 2009
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          Yeah, I'm translating the MoA of an UK limited company for the purpose of it applying for a CZ online betting license, so I guess I should treat it as somewhere near a Czech s.r.o.'s MoA (or at least not near a Czech a.s.' MoA) without being too specific or too definite..

          Why doesn't the English terminology for a limited and a joint-stock company's MoA differ more to make it clearer?? A share CAN be understood and translated as a) akcie and b) podil, but it's a bit confusing - to say the least (if you HAVE to translate it instead of staying vague, which is not possible in Czech:)

          Thanks

          M




          ----- Original Message -----
          From: Simon Vollam
          To: Czechlist@yahoogroups.com
          Sent: Tuesday, January 06, 2009 11:18 AM
          Subject: [Czechlist] Re: Term: private company limited by its shares



          > Spolecenska smlouva (MoA) of a Czech s.r.o. also talks about podily,
          spolecnici or podilnici etc. and what you put in the bank is zakladni
          jmeni...

          In terms of legal form it's clearly the broad equivalent of an s.r.o.,
          so it makes sense to me to use the same general terminology. That the
          company itself is not an s.r.o. under Czech law should be clear enough
          from the context.

          I'm no lawyer, mind.

          Simon





          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
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