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Re: [Czechlist] Help: nadpracovat

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  • Jennifer Hejtmankova
    Coilin, I think that flextime/flexitime would be appropriate (check google for the more common spelling). And wait to see what Jamie has to say, though...
    Message 1 of 12 , Dec 1, 2008
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      Coilin, I think that flextime/flexitime would be appropriate (check
      google for the more common spelling). And wait to see what Jamie has
      to say, though...

      Jennifer

      On 1.12.2008, at 6:57, Jaroslav Hejzlar wrote:

      > Hi, Coilin!
      > I believe you are right, this probably means the possibility to work
      > some hours in advance, probably by staying at work longer hours or
      > by starting work earlier than required (and then to have the extra
      > hours off when I need). HTH.
      > Regards,
      > Jarda
      >
      > ----- Original Message -----
      > From: coilinoc
      > To: Czechlist@yahoogroups.com
      > Sent: Monday, December 01, 2008 12:18 AM
      > Subject: [Czechlist] Help: nadpracovat
      >
      > Hi there,
      >
      > Does anyone know what this phrase means exactly?
      >
      > I have very little context:
      > It's a text about employers attitudes to foreign employees:
      >
      > U pracovniku v nemanualnich pracovnich pozicich se jedna zejmena o
      > moznost prizpusobit si zacatek a konec pracovni doby, u manualnich
      > pracovniku pak spise prilezitost nadpracovat si cast pracovniho dne
      > nebo i delsi casovy usek
      >
      > I don't think it's overtime but some sort of arrangement where you
      > work four ten-hour days instead of five eight-hour days to get your
      > forty hour week. Am I right in this interpretation? And, if so, what
      > would we call that in English? (flexitime?)
      >
      > MTIA
      >
      > Coilin
      >
      > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      >
      >
      >



      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • Jirka Bolech
      Hi Coilin: It s probably about a flexitime system but the sentence is funny talking about differences between white-collar and blue-collar workers unless the
      Message 2 of 12 , Dec 1, 2008
      • 0 Attachment
        Hi Coilin:



        It's probably about a flexitime system but the sentence is funny talking
        about differences between white-collar and blue-collar workers unless the
        system specifies that the former must work strictly 8 hours, of whatever is
        nominal, every day only changing the beginning and end of the hours whereas
        the latter can work a longer shift to make up for other days taking time
        off.



        I don't know if it's about dialects but I would myself never say
        "nadpracovat", always "napracovat"; web search supports both usages...



        Jirka Bolech



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        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      • James Kirchner
        I m a little confused by the usage. It s flex time if the system is actually flexible, voluntary and somewhat controlled by the employee. If it s a rigid
        Message 3 of 12 , Dec 1, 2008
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          I'm a little confused by the usage. It's flex time if the system is
          actually flexible, voluntary and somewhat controlled by the employee.
          If it's a rigid requirement, we don't have a term for the working
          hours, but for the time off, or for the arrangement of the whole week.

          flex time = The start and end of the work day can vary, as the
          employee wishes, and whatever time is lost or gained at the beginning
          of the day is made up at the end.

          comp time = extra time off at the end of the week (or at any time) to
          make up for being forced to work extra hours on a different day.

          four days on / three days off, or three days on / four days off = the
          employee is forced to work a longer standard shift each day, but he
          gets longer weekends.

          So the system is flex time only if it is flexible and the employee is
          somewhat in control of it. If the employee isn't in control of it, I
          would just use a circumlocution.

          Jamie

          On Dec 1, 2008, at 3:05 AM, Jennifer Hejtmankova wrote:

          > Coilin, I think that flextime/flexitime would be appropriate (check
          > google for the more common spelling). And wait to see what Jamie has
          > to say, though...
          >
          > Jennifer
          >
          > On 1.12.2008, at 6:57, Jaroslav Hejzlar wrote:
          >
          > > Hi, Coilin!
          > > I believe you are right, this probably means the possibility to work
          > > some hours in advance, probably by staying at work longer hours or
          > > by starting work earlier than required (and then to have the extra
          > > hours off when I need). HTH.
          > > Regards,
          > > Jarda
          > >
          > > ----- Original Message -----
          > > From: coilinoc
          > > To: Czechlist@yahoogroups.com
          > > Sent: Monday, December 01, 2008 12:18 AM
          > > Subject: [Czechlist] Help: nadpracovat
          > >
          > > Hi there,
          > >
          > > Does anyone know what this phrase means exactly?
          > >
          > > I have very little context:
          > > It's a text about employers attitudes to foreign employees:
          > >
          > > U pracovniku v nemanualnich pracovnich pozicich se jedna zejmena o
          > > moznost prizpusobit si zacatek a konec pracovni doby, u manualnich
          > > pracovniku pak spise prilezitost nadpracovat si cast pracovniho dne
          > > nebo i delsi casovy usek
          > >
          > > I don't think it's overtime but some sort of arrangement where you
          > > work four ten-hour days instead of five eight-hour days to get your
          > > forty hour week. Am I right in this interpretation? And, if so, what
          > > would we call that in English? (flexitime?)
          > >
          > > MTIA
          > >
          > > Coilin
          > >
          > > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          > >
          > >
          > >
          >
          > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          >
          >
          >



          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        • Matej Klimes
          I think it s less flexible and less official than flexitime.. If/when your work does not immediatelly affect others and your superior authorises it, you ll
          Message 4 of 12 , Dec 1, 2008
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            I think it's less flexible and less official than flexitime..

            If/when your work does not immediatelly affect others and your superior authorises it, you'll come in earlier or stay late one day to be able to get off earlier another day. It's not a system, it's just a possibility, it only works if your work is reasonably independent and when your superior is sensible, remember we're talking blue collar jobs and things like flexitime are usually not available to these people..

            nadpracovat simply means to work a little in advance to be able to take time off, it can be used for working after taking time off, alth' strictly grammatically and technically it shouldn't be

            M - musim si ted nadpracovat abych mel zitra volno (ale klienti to asi neuznaji)




            ----- Original Message -----
            From: James Kirchner
            To: Czechlist@yahoogroups.com
            Sent: Monday, December 01, 2008 12:24 PM
            Subject: Re: [Czechlist] Help: nadpracovat


            I'm a little confused by the usage. It's flex time if the system is
            actually flexible, voluntary and somewhat controlled by the employee.
            If it's a rigid requirement, we don't have a term for the working
            hours, but for the time off, or for the arrangement of the whole week.

            flex time = The start and end of the work day can vary, as the
            employee wishes, and whatever time is lost or gained at the beginning
            of the day is made up at the end.

            comp time = extra time off at the end of the week (or at any time) to
            make up for being forced to work extra hours on a different day.

            four days on / three days off, or three days on / four days off = the
            employee is forced to work a longer standard shift each day, but he
            gets longer weekends.

            So the system is flex time only if it is flexible and the employee is
            somewhat in control of it. If the employee isn't in control of it, I
            would just use a circumlocution.

            Jamie

            On Dec 1, 2008, at 3:05 AM, Jennifer Hejtmankova wrote:

            > Coilin, I think that flextime/flexitime would be appropriate (check
            > google for the more common spelling). And wait to see what Jamie has
            > to say, though...
            >
            > Jennifer
            >
            > On 1.12.2008, at 6:57, Jaroslav Hejzlar wrote:
            >
            > > Hi, Coilin!
            > > I believe you are right, this probably means the possibility to work
            > > some hours in advance, probably by staying at work longer hours or
            > > by starting work earlier than required (and then to have the extra
            > > hours off when I need). HTH.
            > > Regards,
            > > Jarda
            > >
            > > ----- Original Message -----
            > > From: coilinoc
            > > To: Czechlist@yahoogroups.com
            > > Sent: Monday, December 01, 2008 12:18 AM
            > > Subject: [Czechlist] Help: nadpracovat
            > >
            > > Hi there,
            > >
            > > Does anyone know what this phrase means exactly?
            > >
            > > I have very little context:
            > > It's a text about employers attitudes to foreign employees:
            > >
            > > U pracovniku v nemanualnich pracovnich pozicich se jedna zejmena o
            > > moznost prizpusobit si zacatek a konec pracovni doby, u manualnich
            > > pracovniku pak spise prilezitost nadpracovat si cast pracovniho dne
            > > nebo i delsi casovy usek
            > >
            > > I don't think it's overtime but some sort of arrangement where you
            > > work four ten-hour days instead of five eight-hour days to get your
            > > forty hour week. Am I right in this interpretation? And, if so, what
            > > would we call that in English? (flexitime?)
            > >
            > > MTIA
            > >
            > > Coilin
            > >
            > > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
            > >
            > >
            > >
            >
            > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
            >
            >
            >

            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]





            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          • James Kirchner
            Then we would say work extra hours . Don t forget, there s also working off the clock , but I don t think that s what we re talking about in this case. Jamie
            Message 5 of 12 , Dec 1, 2008
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              Then we would say "work extra hours".

              Don't forget, there's also "working off the clock", but I don't think
              that's what we're talking about in this case.

              Jamie

              On Dec 1, 2008, at 6:30 AM, Matej Klimes wrote:

              > I think it's less flexible and less official than flexitime..
              >
              > If/when your work does not immediatelly affect others and your
              > superior authorises it, you'll come in earlier or stay late one day
              > to be able to get off earlier another day. It's not a system, it's
              > just a possibility, it only works if your work is reasonably
              > independent and when your superior is sensible, remember we're
              > talking blue collar jobs and things like flexitime are usually not
              > available to these people..
              >
              > nadpracovat simply means to work a little in advance to be able to
              > take time off, it can be used for working after taking time off,
              > alth' strictly grammatically and technically it shouldn't be
              >
              > M - musim si ted nadpracovat abych mel zitra volno (ale klienti to
              > asi neuznaji)
              >
              > ----- Original Message -----
              > From: James Kirchner
              > To: Czechlist@yahoogroups.com
              > Sent: Monday, December 01, 2008 12:24 PM
              > Subject: Re: [Czechlist] Help: nadpracovat
              >
              > I'm a little confused by the usage. It's flex time if the system is
              > actually flexible, voluntary and somewhat controlled by the employee.
              > If it's a rigid requirement, we don't have a term for the working
              > hours, but for the time off, or for the arrangement of the whole week.
              >
              > flex time = The start and end of the work day can vary, as the
              > employee wishes, and whatever time is lost or gained at the beginning
              > of the day is made up at the end.
              >
              > comp time = extra time off at the end of the week (or at any time) to
              > make up for being forced to work extra hours on a different day.
              >
              > four days on / three days off, or three days on / four days off = the
              > employee is forced to work a longer standard shift each day, but he
              > gets longer weekends.
              >
              > So the system is flex time only if it is flexible and the employee is
              > somewhat in control of it. If the employee isn't in control of it, I
              > would just use a circumlocution.
              >
              > Jamie
              >
              > On Dec 1, 2008, at 3:05 AM, Jennifer Hejtmankova wrote:
              >
              > > Coilin, I think that flextime/flexitime would be appropriate (check
              > > google for the more common spelling). And wait to see what Jamie has
              > > to say, though...
              > >
              > > Jennifer
              > >
              > > On 1.12.2008, at 6:57, Jaroslav Hejzlar wrote:
              > >
              > > > Hi, Coilin!
              > > > I believe you are right, this probably means the possibility to
              > work
              > > > some hours in advance, probably by staying at work longer hours or
              > > > by starting work earlier than required (and then to have the extra
              > > > hours off when I need). HTH.
              > > > Regards,
              > > > Jarda
              > > >
              > > > ----- Original Message -----
              > > > From: coilinoc
              > > > To: Czechlist@yahoogroups.com
              > > > Sent: Monday, December 01, 2008 12:18 AM
              > > > Subject: [Czechlist] Help: nadpracovat
              > > >
              > > > Hi there,
              > > >
              > > > Does anyone know what this phrase means exactly?
              > > >
              > > > I have very little context:
              > > > It's a text about employers attitudes to foreign employees:
              > > >
              > > > U pracovniku v nemanualnich pracovnich pozicich se jedna zejmena o
              > > > moznost prizpusobit si zacatek a konec pracovni doby, u manualnich
              > > > pracovniku pak spise prilezitost nadpracovat si cast pracovniho
              > dne
              > > > nebo i delsi casovy usek
              > > >
              > > > I don't think it's overtime but some sort of arrangement where you
              > > > work four ten-hour days instead of five eight-hour days to get
              > your
              > > > forty hour week. Am I right in this interpretation? And, if so,
              > what
              > > > would we call that in English? (flexitime?)
              > > >
              > > > MTIA
              > > >
              > > > Coilin
              > > >
              > > > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
              > > >
              > > >
              > > >
              > >
              > > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
              > >
              > >
              > >
              >
              > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
              >
              > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
              >
              >
              >



              [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
            • Matej Klimes
              working off the clock would be a prescas, right? Or nezapocitany prescas?? If a worker clocks in as they go to work, then I think it would be fairly strange
              Message 6 of 12 , Dec 1, 2008
              • 0 Attachment
                working off the clock would be a prescas, right? Or nezapocitany prescas??

                If a worker clocks in as they go to work, then I think it would be fairly strange for them to work extra after they have clocked out, but in other types of jobs where one has more responsibility and does whatever needs to be done, prescasy are normally not talked about outside of employment contract

                M




                ----- Original Message -----
                From: James Kirchner
                To: Czechlist@yahoogroups.com
                Sent: Monday, December 01, 2008 12:49 PM
                Subject: Re: [Czechlist] Help: nadpracovat


                Then we would say "work extra hours".

                Don't forget, there's also "working off the clock", but I don't think
                that's what we're talking about in this case.

                Jamie

                On Dec 1, 2008, at 6:30 AM, Matej Klimes wrote:

                > I think it's less flexible and less official than flexitime..
                >
                > If/when your work does not immediatelly affect others and your
                > superior authorises it, you'll come in earlier or stay late one day
                > to be able to get off earlier another day. It's not a system, it's
                > just a possibility, it only works if your work is reasonably
                > independent and when your superior is sensible, remember we're
                > talking blue collar jobs and things like flexitime are usually not
                > available to these people..
                >
                > nadpracovat simply means to work a little in advance to be able to
                > take time off, it can be used for working after taking time off,
                > alth' strictly grammatically and technically it shouldn't be
                >
                > M - musim si ted nadpracovat abych mel zitra volno (ale klienti to
                > asi neuznaji)
                >
                > ----- Original Message -----
                > From: James Kirchner
                > To: Czechlist@yahoogroups.com
                > Sent: Monday, December 01, 2008 12:24 PM
                > Subject: Re: [Czechlist] Help: nadpracovat
                >
                > I'm a little confused by the usage. It's flex time if the system is
                > actually flexible, voluntary and somewhat controlled by the employee.
                > If it's a rigid requirement, we don't have a term for the working
                > hours, but for the time off, or for the arrangement of the whole week.
                >
                > flex time = The start and end of the work day can vary, as the
                > employee wishes, and whatever time is lost or gained at the beginning
                > of the day is made up at the end.
                >
                > comp time = extra time off at the end of the week (or at any time) to
                > make up for being forced to work extra hours on a different day.
                >
                > four days on / three days off, or three days on / four days off = the
                > employee is forced to work a longer standard shift each day, but he
                > gets longer weekends.
                >
                > So the system is flex time only if it is flexible and the employee is
                > somewhat in control of it. If the employee isn't in control of it, I
                > would just use a circumlocution.
                >
                > Jamie
                >
                > On Dec 1, 2008, at 3:05 AM, Jennifer Hejtmankova wrote:
                >
                > > Coilin, I think that flextime/flexitime would be appropriate (check
                > > google for the more common spelling). And wait to see what Jamie has
                > > to say, though...
                > >
                > > Jennifer
                > >
                > > On 1.12.2008, at 6:57, Jaroslav Hejzlar wrote:
                > >
                > > > Hi, Coilin!
                > > > I believe you are right, this probably means the possibility to
                > work
                > > > some hours in advance, probably by staying at work longer hours or
                > > > by starting work earlier than required (and then to have the extra
                > > > hours off when I need). HTH.
                > > > Regards,
                > > > Jarda
                > > >
                > > > ----- Original Message -----
                > > > From: coilinoc
                > > > To: Czechlist@yahoogroups.com
                > > > Sent: Monday, December 01, 2008 12:18 AM
                > > > Subject: [Czechlist] Help: nadpracovat
                > > >
                > > > Hi there,
                > > >
                > > > Does anyone know what this phrase means exactly?
                > > >
                > > > I have very little context:
                > > > It's a text about employers attitudes to foreign employees:
                > > >
                > > > U pracovniku v nemanualnich pracovnich pozicich se jedna zejmena o
                > > > moznost prizpusobit si zacatek a konec pracovni doby, u manualnich
                > > > pracovniku pak spise prilezitost nadpracovat si cast pracovniho
                > dne
                > > > nebo i delsi casovy usek
                > > >
                > > > I don't think it's overtime but some sort of arrangement where you
                > > > work four ten-hour days instead of five eight-hour days to get
                > your
                > > > forty hour week. Am I right in this interpretation? And, if so,
                > what
                > > > would we call that in English? (flexitime?)
                > > >
                > > > MTIA
                > > >
                > > > Coilin
                > > >
                > > > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                > > >
                > > >
                > > >
                > >
                > > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                > >
                > >
                > >
                >
                > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                >
                > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                >
                >
                >

                [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]





                [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
              • Matej Klimes
                Waita minute: Work extra hours may simply mean work more than expected/required, as in when there s lots of orders in a business in a busy period, or when
                Message 7 of 12 , Dec 1, 2008
                • 0 Attachment
                  Waita minute: "Work extra hours" may simply mean work more than expected/required, as in when there's lots of orders in a business in a busy period, or when someone does extra shifts because they need extra money - it doesn't always mean that they will get the corresponding time off later - or does it?

                  M


                  ----- Original Message -----
                  From: James Kirchner
                  To: Czechlist@yahoogroups.com
                  Sent: Monday, December 01, 2008 12:49 PM
                  Subject: Re: [Czechlist] Help: nadpracovat


                  Then we would say "work extra hours".

                  Don't forget, there's also "working off the clock", but I don't think
                  that's what we're talking about in this case.

                  Jamie

                  On Dec 1, 2008, at 6:30 AM, Matej Klimes wrote:

                  > I think it's less flexible and less official than flexitime..
                  >
                  > If/when your work does not immediatelly affect others and your
                  > superior authorises it, you'll come in earlier or stay late one day
                  > to be able to get off earlier another day. It's not a system, it's
                  > just a possibility, it only works if your work is reasonably
                  > independent and when your superior is sensible, remember we're
                  > talking blue collar jobs and things like flexitime are usually not
                  > available to these people..
                  >
                  > nadpracovat simply means to work a little in advance to be able to
                  > take time off, it can be used for working after taking time off,
                  > alth' strictly grammatically and technically it shouldn't be
                  >
                  > M - musim si ted nadpracovat abych mel zitra volno (ale klienti to
                  > asi neuznaji)
                  >
                  > ----- Original Message -----
                  > From: James Kirchner
                  > To: Czechlist@yahoogroups.com
                  > Sent: Monday, December 01, 2008 12:24 PM
                  > Subject: Re: [Czechlist] Help: nadpracovat
                  >
                  > I'm a little confused by the usage. It's flex time if the system is
                  > actually flexible, voluntary and somewhat controlled by the employee.
                  > If it's a rigid requirement, we don't have a term for the working
                  > hours, but for the time off, or for the arrangement of the whole week.
                  >
                  > flex time = The start and end of the work day can vary, as the
                  > employee wishes, and whatever time is lost or gained at the beginning
                  > of the day is made up at the end.
                  >
                  > comp time = extra time off at the end of the week (or at any time) to
                  > make up for being forced to work extra hours on a different day.
                  >
                  > four days on / three days off, or three days on / four days off = the
                  > employee is forced to work a longer standard shift each day, but he
                  > gets longer weekends.
                  >
                  > So the system is flex time only if it is flexible and the employee is
                  > somewhat in control of it. If the employee isn't in control of it, I
                  > would just use a circumlocution.
                  >
                  > Jamie
                  >
                  > On Dec 1, 2008, at 3:05 AM, Jennifer Hejtmankova wrote:
                  >
                  > > Coilin, I think that flextime/flexitime would be appropriate (check
                  > > google for the more common spelling). And wait to see what Jamie has
                  > > to say, though...
                  > >
                  > > Jennifer
                  > >
                  > > On 1.12.2008, at 6:57, Jaroslav Hejzlar wrote:
                  > >
                  > > > Hi, Coilin!
                  > > > I believe you are right, this probably means the possibility to
                  > work
                  > > > some hours in advance, probably by staying at work longer hours or
                  > > > by starting work earlier than required (and then to have the extra
                  > > > hours off when I need). HTH.
                  > > > Regards,
                  > > > Jarda
                  > > >
                  > > > ----- Original Message -----
                  > > > From: coilinoc
                  > > > To: Czechlist@yahoogroups.com
                  > > > Sent: Monday, December 01, 2008 12:18 AM
                  > > > Subject: [Czechlist] Help: nadpracovat
                  > > >
                  > > > Hi there,
                  > > >
                  > > > Does anyone know what this phrase means exactly?
                  > > >
                  > > > I have very little context:
                  > > > It's a text about employers attitudes to foreign employees:
                  > > >
                  > > > U pracovniku v nemanualnich pracovnich pozicich se jedna zejmena o
                  > > > moznost prizpusobit si zacatek a konec pracovni doby, u manualnich
                  > > > pracovniku pak spise prilezitost nadpracovat si cast pracovniho
                  > dne
                  > > > nebo i delsi casovy usek
                  > > >
                  > > > I don't think it's overtime but some sort of arrangement where you
                  > > > work four ten-hour days instead of five eight-hour days to get
                  > your
                  > > > forty hour week. Am I right in this interpretation? And, if so,
                  > what
                  > > > would we call that in English? (flexitime?)
                  > > >
                  > > > MTIA
                  > > >
                  > > > Coilin
                  > > >
                  > > > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                  > > >
                  > > >
                  > > >
                  > >
                  > > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                  > >
                  > >
                  > >
                  >
                  > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                  >
                  > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                  >
                  >
                  >

                  [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]





                  [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                • James Kirchner
                  ... It means the second one. ... Some abusive employers or managers require it. They usually end up in court. Jamie
                  Message 8 of 12 , Dec 1, 2008
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                    On Dec 1, 2008, at 6:56 AM, Matej Klimes wrote:

                    > working off the clock would be a prescas, right? Or nezapocitany
                    > prescas??
                    >

                    It means the second one.

                    > If a worker clocks in as they go to work, then I think it would be
                    > fairly strange for them to work extra after they have clocked out,
                    >

                    Some abusive employers or managers require it. They usually end up in
                    court.

                    Jamie
                  • James Kirchner
                    ... No, it doesn t. The problem is that we don t have a term for forced, inflexible flex time. The only way to express it is to say, They re making me work
                    Message 9 of 12 , Dec 1, 2008
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                      On Dec 1, 2008, at 6:58 AM, Matej Klimes wrote:

                      > Waita minute: "Work extra hours" may simply mean work more than
                      > expected/required, as in when there's lots of orders in a business
                      > in a busy period, or when someone does extra shifts because they
                      > need extra money - it doesn't always mean that they will get the
                      > corresponding time off later - or does it?
                      >

                      No, it doesn't. The problem is that we don't have a term for forced,
                      inflexible flex time.

                      The only way to express it is to say, "They're making me work extra
                      hours, but they'll give me extra time off later," or, "I have to work
                      extra hours, but my employer is giving me comp time later," or
                      something to that effect.

                      Jamie
                    • Matej Klimes
                      Yeah, that s clear and it s what nadpracovat means, only nadpracovat is usually voluntary. I still think I must have heard people talk about extra hours
                      Message 10 of 12 , Dec 1, 2008
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                        Yeah, that's clear and it's what nadpracovat means, only nadpracovat is usually voluntary. I still think I must have heard people talk about extra hours without it meaning any compensation later, just working more.. If I wanted it to be clear, I would use not extra hours on its own...

                        Another reason why I don't like it for nadpracovat is that your examples sound like it's a regular thing, someone's "forced to" work longer and then given some sort of compensation, in time or money, but nadpracovat - especially in your example - means "to be able to work longer and then take the corresponding time off" - it's done because the worker wants it and because it suits them and the boss is being nice to allow it.. hope I'm being clear...

                        I don't think it should be a problem to say something along the lines of "some, especially blue collar workers like to me their workhours more flexible by working extra time on certain days and then taking the corresponding time off when they need to" - I haven't even looked at your example now to see if it fits 100%, but that's how it sounded to me when I first read it and that's how it works.. it seemed like a semi-informal report or presentation where this type of sentence would sound Ok and would be easier to understand than trying to come up with an official-sounding one or two word term - just my 2 c's :)

                        M


                        ----- Original Message -----
                        From: James Kirchner
                        To: Czechlist@yahoogroups.com
                        Sent: Monday, December 01, 2008 1:12 PM
                        Subject: Re: [Czechlist] Help: nadpracovat



                        On Dec 1, 2008, at 6:58 AM, Matej Klimes wrote:

                        > Waita minute: "Work extra hours" may simply mean work more than
                        > expected/required, as in when there's lots of orders in a business
                        > in a busy period, or when someone does extra shifts because they
                        > need extra money - it doesn't always mean that they will get the
                        > corresponding time off later - or does it?
                        >

                        No, it doesn't. The problem is that we don't have a term for forced,
                        inflexible flex time.

                        The only way to express it is to say, "They're making me work extra
                        hours, but they'll give me extra time off later," or, "I have to work
                        extra hours, but my employer is giving me comp time later," or
                        something to that effect.

                        Jamie





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