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"obavy"

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  • James Kirchner
    When someone has obavy in the clinical sense, what doe he have? The word has a million translations into English. I m leaning toward phobias , but it
    Message 1 of 20 , Nov 16, 2008
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      When someone has "obavy" in the clinical sense, what doe he have? The
      word has a million translations into English. I'm leaning toward
      "phobias", but it doesn't seem exactly right to me.

      Thanks very much.

      Jamie
    • Josef Hlavac
      I doubt it. Doctors call a phobia a fobie . Context, context, ...? Josef
      Message 2 of 20 , Nov 16, 2008
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        I doubt it. Doctors call a "phobia" a "fobie".

        Context, context, ...?

        Josef

        James Kirchner wrote:
        > When someone has "obavy" in the clinical sense, what doe he have? The
        > word has a million translations into English. I'm leaning toward
        > "phobias", but it doesn't seem exactly right to me.
        >
        > Thanks very much.
        >
        > Jamie
        >
        >
        > ------------------------------------
        >
        > Translators' tricks of the trade:
        > http://czeng.wetpaint.com/
        >
        >
        >
        >
        > Yahoo! Groups Links
        >
        >
        >
      • Jaroslav Hejzlar
        Hi, Jamie! I suppose it could be anxiety, because the respective medicaments for treating this state are called anxiolytika in Czech. HTH. Regards, Jarda ...
        Message 3 of 20 , Nov 16, 2008
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          Hi, Jamie!
          I suppose it could be anxiety, because the respective medicaments for treating this state are called "anxiolytika" in Czech. HTH.
          Regards,
          Jarda

          ----- Original Message -----
          From: James Kirchner
          To: Czechlist@yahoogroups.com
          Sent: Sunday, November 16, 2008 12:33 PM
          Subject: [Czechlist] "obavy"


          When someone has "obavy" in the clinical sense, what doe he have? The
          word has a million translations into English. I'm leaning toward
          "phobias", but it doesn't seem exactly right to me.

          Thanks very much.

          Jamie





          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        • James Kirchner
          Thanks, Josef and Jarda. The problem I m having is that in this text there seems to be a distinction made between uzkost , which is used to mean anxiety ,
          Message 4 of 20 , Nov 16, 2008
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            Thanks, Josef and Jarda.

            The problem I'm having is that in this text there seems to be a
            distinction made between "uzkost", which is used to mean "anxiety",
            and "obavy". The two will be mentioned in the same sentence as two
            different things. The "obavy" seem to be fears of various things,
            such as taking exams in school, going to various events, etc., but
            they don't strike me as reaching the level of a phobia. Maybe I
            should just say "fears", but that won't sound right in the context.

            Jamie

            On Nov 16, 2008, at 6:49 AM, Jaroslav Hejzlar wrote:

            > Hi, Jamie!
            > I suppose it could be anxiety, because the respective medicaments
            > for treating this state are called "anxiolytika" in Czech. HTH.
            > Regards,
            > Jarda
            >
            > ----- Original Message -----
            > From: James Kirchner
            > To: Czechlist@yahoogroups.com
            > Sent: Sunday, November 16, 2008 12:33 PM
            > Subject: [Czechlist] "obavy"
            >
            > When someone has "obavy" in the clinical sense, what doe he have? The
            > word has a million translations into English. I'm leaning toward
            > "phobias", but it doesn't seem exactly right to me.
            >
            > Thanks very much.
            >
            > Jamie
            >
            > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
            >
            >
            >



            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          • kzgafas
            Diky Romane a Petrovi. Petre, nevis, jak muze takova sul vypadat? Kde tam muze byt navazan substituent? Primo na centralnim C nebo az nekde na R? Diky, K. ...
            Message 5 of 20 , Nov 16, 2008
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              Diky Romane a Petrovi. Petre, nevis, jak muze takova sul vypadat? Kde
              tam muze byt navazan substituent? Primo na centralnim C nebo az nekde
              na R?

              Diky,

              K.



              --- In Czechlist@yahoogroups.com, "spektrum2002" <padamek@...> wrote:
              >
              > Ten nepomer mezi poctem vyskytu v cestine a v anglictine je skutecne
              > zarazejici, ale ja bych se stejne vyrazu "sul esteru" drzel.
              > Mimochodem, ten pocet ceskych vyskytu se o neco zvysi, kdyz si
              > vyzkousis "sul methylesteru", "sul ethylesteru", "sul propylesteru"
              apod.
              > Petr Adamek
              > --- In Czechlist@yahoogroups.com, "kzgafas" <kzgafas@> wrote:
              > >
              > > Mam trochu problem s prekladem: ester salt
              > >
              > > Jeden by rekl ze sul esteru, pochopitelne, ale overeni Googlem v
              > > cestine dopada hodne mizerne, jako by v cestine snad nic takoveho
              > > nebylo. Na druhe strane Google v anglictine ukazuje celkem
              realisticky
              > > vyskyt pro pro ester salt. Mate nekdo nejak nazor na cesky
              preklad?
              > >
              > > Diky,
              > >
              > > K.
              > >
              >
            • Romana
              Hi Jamie, It is definitely worries . The second best option would be fears , which is already a bit stronger (something that could be medically treated). I
              Message 6 of 20 , Nov 16, 2008
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                Hi Jamie,



                It is definitely "worries".



                The second best option would be "fears", which is already a bit stronger
                (something that could be medically treated).

                I agree with you that "uzkost" is well translated as anxiety.



                Cheers,

                Romana





                From: Czechlist@yahoogroups.com [mailto:Czechlist@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf
                Of James Kirchner
                Sent: Sunday, 16 November 2008 10:34 PM
                To: Czechlist@yahoogroups.com
                Subject: Re: [Czechlist] "obavy"



                Thanks, Josef and Jarda.

                The problem I'm having is that in this text there seems to be a
                distinction made between "uzkost", which is used to mean "anxiety",
                and "obavy". The two will be mentioned in the same sentence as two
                different things. The "obavy" seem to be fears of various things,
                such as taking exams in school, going to various events, etc., but
                they don't strike me as reaching the level of a phobia. Maybe I
                should just say "fears", but that won't sound right in the context.

                Jamie

                On Nov 16, 2008, at 6:49 AM, Jaroslav Hejzlar wrote:

                > Hi, Jamie!
                > I suppose it could be anxiety, because the respective medicaments
                > for treating this state are called "anxiolytika" in Czech. HTH.
                > Regards,
                > Jarda
                >
                > ----- Original Message -----
                > From: James Kirchner
                > To: Czechlist@yahoogroups.com <mailto:Czechlist%40yahoogroups.com>
                > Sent: Sunday, November 16, 2008 12:33 PM
                > Subject: [Czechlist] "obavy"
                >
                > When someone has "obavy" in the clinical sense, what doe he have? The
                > word has a million translations into English. I'm leaning toward
                > "phobias", but it doesn't seem exactly right to me.
                >
                > Thanks very much.
                >
                > Jamie
                >
                > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                >
                >
                >

                [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]





                [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
              • Jirka Bolech
                Hi Jamie: If you think obavy refers to a condition not usually requiring treatment, could you perhaps call it worries? Jirka No virus found in this incoming
                Message 7 of 20 , Nov 16, 2008
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                  Hi Jamie:



                  If you think obavy refers to a condition not usually requiring treatment,
                  could you perhaps call it worries?



                  Jirka



                  No virus found in this incoming message
                  Checked by PC Tools AntiVirus (5.0.0.10 - 10.100.056).
                  http://www.pctools.com/free-antivirus/

                  No virus found in this outgoing message
                  Checked by PC Tools AntiVirus (5.0.0.10 - 10.100.056).
                  http://www.pctools.com/free-antivirus/




                  [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                • Vlastimila Palíková
                  What about worries ? Regards, Vlasta Palikova ... From: Czechlist@yahoogroups.com [mailto:Czechlist@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of James Kirchner Sent: Sunday,
                  Message 8 of 20 , Nov 16, 2008
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                    What about "worries"?

                    Regards, Vlasta Palikova



                    -----Original Message-----
                    From: Czechlist@yahoogroups.com [mailto:Czechlist@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf
                    Of James Kirchner
                    Sent: Sunday, November 16, 2008 1:04 PM
                    To: Czechlist@yahoogroups.com
                    Subject: Re: [Czechlist] "obavy"



                    Thanks, Josef and Jarda.

                    The problem I'm having is that in this text there seems to be a
                    distinction made between "uzkost", which is used to mean "anxiety",
                    and "obavy". The two will be mentioned in the same sentence as two
                    different things. The "obavy" seem to be fears of various things,
                    such as taking exams in school, going to various events, etc., but
                    they don't strike me as reaching the level of a phobia. Maybe I
                    should just say "fears", but that won't sound right in the context.

                    Jamie

                    On Nov 16, 2008, at 6:49 AM, Jaroslav Hejzlar wrote:

                    > Hi, Jamie!
                    > I suppose it could be anxiety, because the respective medicaments
                    > for treating this state are called "anxiolytika" in Czech. HTH.
                    > Regards,
                    > Jarda
                    >
                    > ----- Original Message -----
                    > From: James Kirchner
                    > To: Czechlist@yahoogrou <mailto:Czechlist%40yahoogroups.com> ps.com
                    > Sent: Sunday, November 16, 2008 12:33 PM
                    > Subject: [Czechlist] "obavy"
                    >
                    > When someone has "obavy" in the clinical sense, what doe he have? The
                    > word has a million translations into English. I'm leaning toward
                    > "phobias", but it doesn't seem exactly right to me.
                    >
                    > Thanks very much.
                    >
                    > Jamie
                    >
                    > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                    >
                    >
                    >

                    [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]





                    [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                  • James Kirchner
                    Now I have to figure out a graceful translation of mam obavy , because I have worries would sound like Czenglish. Maybe I ll have to go with fears . Thank
                    Message 9 of 20 , Nov 16, 2008
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                      Now I have to figure out a graceful translation of "mam obavy",
                      because "I have worries" would sound like Czenglish. Maybe I'll have
                      to go with "fears".

                      Thank you for your help, Romana.

                      Jamie

                      On Nov 16, 2008, at 7:29 AM, Romana wrote:

                      > Hi Jamie,
                      >
                      > It is definitely "worries".
                      >
                      > The second best option would be "fears", which is already a bit
                      > stronger
                      > (something that could be medically treated).
                      >
                      > I agree with you that "uzkost" is well translated as anxiety.
                      >
                      > Cheers,
                      >
                      > Romana
                      >
                      > From: Czechlist@yahoogroups.com [mailto:Czechlist@yahoogroups.com]
                      > On Behalf
                      > Of James Kirchner
                      > Sent: Sunday, 16 November 2008 10:34 PM
                      > To: Czechlist@yahoogroups.com
                      > Subject: Re: [Czechlist] "obavy"
                      >
                      > Thanks, Josef and Jarda.
                      >
                      > The problem I'm having is that in this text there seems to be a
                      > distinction made between "uzkost", which is used to mean "anxiety",
                      > and "obavy". The two will be mentioned in the same sentence as two
                      > different things. The "obavy" seem to be fears of various things,
                      > such as taking exams in school, going to various events, etc., but
                      > they don't strike me as reaching the level of a phobia. Maybe I
                      > should just say "fears", but that won't sound right in the context.
                      >
                      > Jamie
                      >
                      > On Nov 16, 2008, at 6:49 AM, Jaroslav Hejzlar wrote:
                      >
                      > > Hi, Jamie!
                      > > I suppose it could be anxiety, because the respective medicaments
                      > > for treating this state are called "anxiolytika" in Czech. HTH.
                      > > Regards,
                      > > Jarda
                      > >
                      > > ----- Original Message -----
                      > > From: James Kirchner
                      > > To: Czechlist@yahoogroups.com <mailto:Czechlist%40yahoogroups.com>
                      > > Sent: Sunday, November 16, 2008 12:33 PM
                      > > Subject: [Czechlist] "obavy"
                      > >
                      > > When someone has "obavy" in the clinical sense, what doe he have?
                      > The
                      > > word has a million translations into English. I'm leaning toward
                      > > "phobias", but it doesn't seem exactly right to me.
                      > >
                      > > Thanks very much.
                      > >
                      > > Jamie
                      > >
                      > > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                      > >
                      > >
                      > >
                      >
                      > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                      >
                      > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                      >
                      >
                      >



                      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                    • James Kirchner
                      I think it requires treatment, because it stops the person from doing things that he or she should be doing. The thing is that we don t say, I have worries,
                      Message 10 of 20 , Nov 16, 2008
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                        I think it requires treatment, because it stops the person from doing
                        things that he or she should be doing. The thing is that we don't
                        say, "I have worries," in modern English, or in that context, and
                        saying, "I worry about things," doesn't sound sick enough.
                        Personally, I think that the modern, exaggerated use of the word
                        "phobia" fits, but I'm debating with myself over it.

                        But you guys have given me a good idea of the meaning. Now it's up to
                        me to figure out how to convey it.

                        Thanks very much.

                        Jamie

                        On Nov 16, 2008, at 7:32 AM, Jirka Bolech wrote:

                        > Hi Jamie:
                        >
                        > If you think obavy refers to a condition not usually requiring
                        > treatment,
                        > could you perhaps call it worries?
                        >
                        > Jirka
                        >
                        > No virus found in this incoming message
                        > Checked by PC Tools AntiVirus (5.0.0.10 - 10.100.056).
                        > http://www.pctools.com/free-antivirus/
                        >
                        > No virus found in this outgoing message
                        > Checked by PC Tools AntiVirus (5.0.0.10 - 10.100.056).
                        > http://www.pctools.com/free-antivirus/
                        >
                        > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                        >
                        >
                        >



                        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                      • Romana
                        Jamie, Have you ever read the book by Dale Carnegie, Stop worrying and start living ? See anywhere at http://www.google.com.au/search?hl=en
                        Message 11 of 20 , Nov 16, 2008
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                          Jamie,



                          Have you ever read the book by Dale Carnegie, "Stop worrying and start
                          living"?

                          See anywhere at http://www.google.com.au/search?hl=en
                          <http://www.google.com.au/search?hl=en&rlz=1T4SKPB_enAU265AU267&q=Dale+Carne
                          gie+Don%27t+worry+-+live&meta>
                          &rlz=1T4SKPB_enAU265AU267&q=Dale+Carnegie+Don%27t+worry+-+live&meta=

                          It is a mental condition that requires treatment, but not a medical one.

                          You will go well with "I worry...".



                          Regards,

                          Romana







                          From: Czechlist@yahoogroups.com [mailto:Czechlist@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf
                          Of James Kirchner
                          Sent: Sunday, 16 November 2008 11:10 PM
                          To: Czechlist@yahoogroups.com
                          Subject: Re: [Czechlist] "obavy"



                          I think it requires treatment, because it stops the person from doing
                          things that he or she should be doing. The thing is that we don't
                          say, "I have worries," in modern English, or in that context, and
                          saying, "I worry about things," doesn't sound sick enough.
                          Personally, I think that the modern, exaggerated use of the word
                          "phobia" fits, but I'm debating with myself over it.

                          But you guys have given me a good idea of the meaning. Now it's up to
                          me to figure out how to convey it.

                          Thanks very much.

                          Jamie

                          On Nov 16, 2008, at 7:32 AM, Jirka Bolech wrote:

                          > Hi Jamie:
                          >
                          > If you think obavy refers to a condition not usually requiring
                          > treatment,
                          > could you perhaps call it worries?
                          >
                          > Jirka
                          >
                          > No virus found in this incoming message
                          > Checked by PC Tools AntiVirus (5.0.0.10 - 10.100.056).
                          > http://www.pctools.com/free-antivirus/
                          >
                          > No virus found in this outgoing message
                          > Checked by PC Tools AntiVirus (5.0.0.10 - 10.100.056).
                          > http://www.pctools.com/free-antivirus/
                          >
                          > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                          >
                          >
                          >

                          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]





                          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                        • Martin Janda
                          Nejsem vzdelanim primo chemik, ale centralni uhliky organickych sloucenin byvaji dost stabilni a inertni - divil bych se, kdyby to bylo na nich. Martin
                          Message 12 of 20 , Nov 16, 2008
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                            Nejsem vzdelanim primo chemik, ale centralni uhliky organickych
                            sloucenin byvaji dost stabilni a inertni - divil bych se, kdyby to bylo
                            na nich.

                            Martin

                            kzgafas napsal(a):
                            >
                            >
                            > Diky Romane a Petrovi. Petre, nevis, jak muze takova sul vypadat? Kde
                            > tam muze byt navazan substituent? Primo na centralnim C nebo az nekde
                            > na R?
                            >
                            > Diky,
                            >
                            > K.
                            >
                            >
                            > --- In Czechlist@yahoogroups.com <mailto:Czechlist%40yahoogroups.com>,
                            > "spektrum2002" <padamek@...> wrote:
                            > >
                            > > Ten nepomer mezi poctem vyskytu v cestine a v anglictine je skutecne
                            > > zarazejici, ale ja bych se stejne vyrazu "sul esteru" drzel.
                            > > Mimochodem, ten pocet ceskych vyskytu se o neco zvysi, kdyz si
                            > > vyzkousis "sul methylesteru", "sul ethylesteru", "sul propylesteru"
                            > apod.
                            > > Petr Adamek
                            > > --- In Czechlist@yahoogroups.com
                            > <mailto:Czechlist%40yahoogroups.com>, "kzgafas" <kzgafas@> wrote:
                            > > >
                            > > > Mam trochu problem s prekladem: ester salt
                            > > >
                            > > > Jeden by rekl ze sul esteru, pochopitelne, ale overeni Googlem v
                            > > > cestine dopada hodne mizerne, jako by v cestine snad nic takoveho
                            > > > nebylo. Na druhe strane Google v anglictine ukazuje celkem
                            > realisticky
                            > > > vyskyt pro pro ester salt. Mate nekdo nejak nazor na cesky
                            > preklad?
                            > > >
                            > > > Diky,
                            > > >
                            > > > K.
                            > > >
                            > >
                            >
                            >
                          • spektrum2002
                            Ja (uz) taky az tak chemik nejsem, ale souhlasim. Ale ani na tom R se mi to nezda, spis si myslim, ze by to mohl byt ester vicesytne kyseliny, kde jedno (nebo
                            Message 13 of 20 , Nov 16, 2008
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                              Ja (uz) taky az tak chemik nejsem, ale souhlasim. Ale ani na tom R se
                              mi to nezda, spis si myslim, ze by to mohl byt ester vicesytne
                              kyseliny, kde jedno (nebo nekolik) COOH bude zesterizovano a druhe
                              bude substiuovano tim kationtem. Nekdy jsou to taky zmrseniny, ze ten
                              ester ma proste zaporny naboj a poji se s kationtem (trebas NH4).
                              Petr
                              --- In Czechlist@yahoogroups.com, Martin Janda <mjanda@...> wrote:
                              >
                              > Nejsem vzdelanim primo chemik, ale centralni uhliky organickych
                              > sloucenin byvaji dost stabilni a inertni - divil bych se, kdyby to bylo
                              > na nich.
                              >
                              > Martin
                              >
                              > kzgafas napsal(a):
                              > >
                              > >
                              > > Diky Romane a Petrovi. Petre, nevis, jak muze takova sul vypadat? Kde
                              > > tam muze byt navazan substituent? Primo na centralnim C nebo az nekde
                              > > na R?
                              > >
                              > > Diky,
                              > >
                              > > K.
                              > >
                              > >
                              > > --- In Czechlist@yahoogroups.com
                              <mailto:Czechlist%40yahoogroups.com>,
                              > > "spektrum2002" <padamek@> wrote:
                              > > >
                              > > > Ten nepomer mezi poctem vyskytu v cestine a v anglictine je
                              skutecne
                              > > > zarazejici, ale ja bych se stejne vyrazu "sul esteru" drzel.
                              > > > Mimochodem, ten pocet ceskych vyskytu se o neco zvysi, kdyz si
                              > > > vyzkousis "sul methylesteru", "sul ethylesteru", "sul propylesteru"
                              > > apod.
                              > > > Petr Adamek
                              > > > --- In Czechlist@yahoogroups.com
                              > > <mailto:Czechlist%40yahoogroups.com>, "kzgafas" <kzgafas@> wrote:
                              > > > >
                              > > > > Mam trochu problem s prekladem: ester salt
                              > > > >
                              > > > > Jeden by rekl ze sul esteru, pochopitelne, ale overeni Googlem v
                              > > > > cestine dopada hodne mizerne, jako by v cestine snad nic takoveho
                              > > > > nebylo. Na druhe strane Google v anglictine ukazuje celkem
                              > > realisticky
                              > > > > vyskyt pro pro ester salt. Mate nekdo nejak nazor na cesky
                              > > preklad?
                              > > > >
                              > > > > Diky,
                              > > > >
                              > > > > K.
                              > > > >
                              > > >
                              > >
                              > >
                              >
                            • kzgafas
                              Ja ted vlastne prekladam patent, z toho bych se to mel dozvedet. Tak vam dam potom vedet.:-) K. ... se ... ten ... to bylo ... vypadat? Kde ... nekde ... si
                              Message 14 of 20 , Nov 16, 2008
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                                Ja ted vlastne prekladam patent, z toho bych se to mel dozvedet. Tak
                                vam dam potom vedet.:-)

                                K.


                                --- In Czechlist@yahoogroups.com, "spektrum2002" <padamek@...> wrote:
                                >
                                > Ja (uz) taky az tak chemik nejsem, ale souhlasim. Ale ani na tom R
                                se
                                > mi to nezda, spis si myslim, ze by to mohl byt ester vicesytne
                                > kyseliny, kde jedno (nebo nekolik) COOH bude zesterizovano a druhe
                                > bude substiuovano tim kationtem. Nekdy jsou to taky zmrseniny, ze
                                ten
                                > ester ma proste zaporny naboj a poji se s kationtem (trebas NH4).
                                > Petr
                                > --- In Czechlist@yahoogroups.com, Martin Janda <mjanda@> wrote:
                                > >
                                > > Nejsem vzdelanim primo chemik, ale centralni uhliky organickych
                                > > sloucenin byvaji dost stabilni a inertni - divil bych se, kdyby
                                to bylo
                                > > na nich.
                                > >
                                > > Martin
                                > >
                                > > kzgafas napsal(a):
                                > > >
                                > > >
                                > > > Diky Romane a Petrovi. Petre, nevis, jak muze takova sul
                                vypadat? Kde
                                > > > tam muze byt navazan substituent? Primo na centralnim C nebo az
                                nekde
                                > > > na R?
                                > > >
                                > > > Diky,
                                > > >
                                > > > K.
                                > > >
                                > > >
                                > > > --- In Czechlist@yahoogroups.com
                                > <mailto:Czechlist%40yahoogroups.com>,
                                > > > "spektrum2002" <padamek@> wrote:
                                > > > >
                                > > > > Ten nepomer mezi poctem vyskytu v cestine a v anglictine je
                                > skutecne
                                > > > > zarazejici, ale ja bych se stejne vyrazu "sul esteru" drzel.
                                > > > > Mimochodem, ten pocet ceskych vyskytu se o neco zvysi, kdyz
                                si
                                > > > > vyzkousis "sul methylesteru", "sul ethylesteru", "sul
                                propylesteru"
                                > > > apod.
                                > > > > Petr Adamek
                                > > > > --- In Czechlist@yahoogroups.com
                                > > > <mailto:Czechlist%40yahoogroups.com>, "kzgafas" <kzgafas@>
                                wrote:
                                > > > > >
                                > > > > > Mam trochu problem s prekladem: ester salt
                                > > > > >
                                > > > > > Jeden by rekl ze sul esteru, pochopitelne, ale overeni
                                Googlem v
                                > > > > > cestine dopada hodne mizerne, jako by v cestine snad nic
                                takoveho
                                > > > > > nebylo. Na druhe strane Google v anglictine ukazuje celkem
                                > > > realisticky
                                > > > > > vyskyt pro pro ester salt. Mate nekdo nejak nazor na cesky
                                > > > preklad?
                                > > > > >
                                > > > > > Diky,
                                > > > > >
                                > > > > > K.
                                > > > > >
                                > > > >
                                > > >
                                > > >
                                > >
                                >
                              • James Kirchner
                                I know that paleni z^ahy means heartburn, but no dictionary or reference book seems to tell what the z^aha is called in English.. Any help? Jamie
                                Message 15 of 20 , Nov 16, 2008
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                                  I know that "paleni z^ahy" means heartburn, but no dictionary or
                                  reference book seems to tell what the "z^aha" is called in English..

                                  Any help?

                                  Jamie
                                • Jirka Bolech
                                  Hi Jamie: I believe that zaha is heartburn. The Czech word means the burning sensation in gullet. Paleni zahy may simply be thought of as tautology. In English
                                  Message 16 of 20 , Nov 16, 2008
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                                    Hi Jamie:



                                    I believe that zaha is heartburn. The Czech word means the burning sensation
                                    in gullet. Paleni zahy may simply be thought of as tautology. In English you
                                    simply have heartburns, right? Other usages of the word zaha, besides paleni
                                    zahy, are in idioms...



                                    Jirka



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                                  • James Kirchner
                                    Thanks, Jirka. In English we say heartburn -- an uncountable singular. Jamie ... [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                                    Message 17 of 20 , Nov 16, 2008
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                                      Thanks, Jirka. In English we say "heartburn" -- an uncountable
                                      singular.

                                      Jamie

                                      On Nov 16, 2008, at 6:09 PM, Jirka Bolech wrote:

                                      > Hi Jamie:
                                      >
                                      > I believe that zaha is heartburn. The Czech word means the burning
                                      > sensation
                                      > in gullet. Paleni zahy may simply be thought of as tautology. In
                                      > English you
                                      > simply have heartburns, right? Other usages of the word zaha,
                                      > besides paleni
                                      > zahy, are in idioms...
                                      >
                                      > Jirka
                                      >
                                      > No virus found in this incoming message
                                      > Checked by PC Tools AntiVirus (5.0.0.10 - 10.100.056).
                                      > http://www.pctools.com/free-antivirus/
                                      >
                                      > No virus found in this outgoing message
                                      > Checked by PC Tools AntiVirus (5.0.0.10 - 10.100.056).
                                      > http://www.pctools.com/free-antivirus/
                                      >
                                      > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                                      >
                                      >
                                      >



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