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Re: CHAT: Czechia rears its head again

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  • kzgafas
    Yes, that is right, media is that authority. However, I was not so naive to ask about an authority which might help . Outside interference into such process
    Message 1 of 62 , Sep 3, 2008
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      Yes, that is right, media is that authority. However, I was not so
      naive to ask about an "authority which might help". Outside
      interference into such process would be motivated in most cases by
      the interest of that party. For instance someone might exploit this
      issue to create tensions between Czechs and Moravians - only
      theoretically, this does not seem to be the issue in this case.

      K.

      --- In Czechlist@yahoogroups.com, James Kirchner <jpklists@...> wrote:
      >
      > There is no authority in the English language that contributes to
      such
      > a process, other than 50 million newspaper and broadcast news
      editors,
      > and it's hard to get them coordinated (although the Democrats do a
      > pretty good job of getting them all to slant stories in the same
      > way). Even if these people wanted to help, it wouldn't do any
      good,
      > because the Czech Republic only comes up in the English-language
      news
      > once every two years or so, and you couldn't get the benefit of
      > repetition.
      >
      > As for who names places, it's a principle of historical
      linguistics
      > that places are not named by their inhabitants. Illustrations of
      this
      > are the names of places like Kozolupy, Mecholupy and Mrchojedy.
      >
      > Jamie
      >
      > On Sep 3, 2008, at 7:54 AM, kzgafas wrote:
      >
      > > I would say it is most probably the English speaking
      people/countries
      > > who may decide about English names of anything - in the same way
      as
      > > each nation/society decides on how they will name places anywhere
      > > eåse. Is there any such authority in English speakiíng countries
      that
      > > might contribute to this process?
      > >
      > > K.
      > >
      > > --- In Czechlist@yahoogroups.com, "Matej Klimes" <mklimes@> wrote:
      > > >
      > > > Coilin, please cut and paste all these into a file and send it
      to
      > > Brno before these academics talk to Klaus and he makes Czechia
      > > official and to be enforced with death penalty
      > > >
      > > > M
      > > >
      > > >
      > > > ----- Original Message -----
      > > > From: melvyn.geo
      > > > To: Czechlist@yahoogroups.com
      > > > Sent: Wednesday, September 03, 2008 12:49 PM
      > > > Subject: [Czechlist] Re: CHAT: Czechia rears its head again
      > > >
      > > >
      > > > --- In Czechlist@yahoogroups.com, James Kirchner <jpklists@>
      > > wrote:
      > > > >so you have to pronounce it [k] and
      > > > > get "Czekia", which doesn't mean anything to people's ears.
      > > >
      > > > All a matter of familiarity, really. For those who are not so
      > > familiar
      > > > with the place I will sometimes say "in Czech..." and when
      > > recognition
      > > > fleetingly dawns on them I might add a quick "...ia".
      > > >
      > > > If that doesn't cut it in informal settings then I use Czecho,
      > > > Czecholand, Czeshire...whatever raises a smile.
      > > >
      > > > Not very fussed either way, myself.
      > > >
      > > > Formally, my default mode is still to translate Cesko as Czech
      > > > Republic, unless the client has strong opinions on the subject.
      > > >
      > > > BR
      > > >
      > > > M.
      > > >
      > > > From the great Czechlist Czechia debate of 2004:
      > > > To the tune of "Everything's Free in America":
      > > >
      > > > Czechia, Czechia, Czechia,
      > > > Not quite as far as Uzbekia,
      > > > Turn left at Ruritania,
      > > > Don't stop in Transylvania.
      > > >
      > > > Czechia, Czechia, Czechia,
      > > > Nothing to do with Uzbekia,
      > > > Won't find a name that's much tackier,
      > > > Maybe except for Slovakia.
      > > >
      > > >
      > > >
      > > >
      > > >
      > > > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      > > >
      > >
      > >
      > >
      >
      >
      >
      > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      >
    • James Kirchner
      Thanks, Josef and Gerry. My hunch is now that this abbreviation is, in fact, document specific and doesn t call for translation. Jamie ... [Non-text portions
      Message 62 of 62 , Sep 6, 2008
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        Thanks, Josef and Gerry. My hunch is now that this abbreviation is,
        in fact, document specific and doesn't call for translation.

        Jamie

        On Sep 6, 2008, at 3:15 AM, Josef Hlavac wrote:

        > This is most likely a very specific jargon or a document-specific
        > abbreviation. Maybe even a brand/model designation. Certainly not a
        > commonly recognized abbreviation, not even in elec engineering.
        >
        > Josef
        >
        > James Kirchner wrote:
        > > Can anyone tell me what "DM" stands for in "DM ovladac" in an
        > > electrical appliance?
        > >
        > > Thanks.
        > >
        > > Jamie
        > >
        > >
        > > ------------------------------------
        > >
        > > Translators' tricks of the trade:
        > > http://czeng.wetpaint.com/
        > >
        > >
        > >
        > >
        > > Yahoo! Groups Links
        > >
        > >
        > >
        >
        >



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