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Re: CHAT: Czechia rears its head again

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  • kzgafas
    I would say it is most probably the English speaking people/countries who may decide about English names of anything - in the same way as each nation/society
    Message 1 of 62 , Sep 3, 2008
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      I would say it is most probably the English speaking people/countries
      who may decide about English names of anything - in the same way as
      each nation/society decides on how they will name places anywhere
      eåse. Is there any such authority in English speakiíng countries that
      might contribute to this process?

      K.



      --- In Czechlist@yahoogroups.com, "Matej Klimes" <mklimes@...> wrote:
      >
      > Coilin, please cut and paste all these into a file and send it to
      Brno before these academics talk to Klaus and he makes Czechia
      official and to be enforced with death penalty
      >
      > M
      >
      >
      > ----- Original Message -----
      > From: melvyn.geo
      > To: Czechlist@yahoogroups.com
      > Sent: Wednesday, September 03, 2008 12:49 PM
      > Subject: [Czechlist] Re: CHAT: Czechia rears its head again
      >
      >
      > --- In Czechlist@yahoogroups.com, James Kirchner <jpklists@>
      wrote:
      > >so you have to pronounce it [k] and
      > > get "Czekia", which doesn't mean anything to people's ears.
      >
      > All a matter of familiarity, really. For those who are not so
      familiar
      > with the place I will sometimes say "in Czech..." and when
      recognition
      > fleetingly dawns on them I might add a quick "...ia".
      >
      > If that doesn't cut it in informal settings then I use Czecho,
      > Czecholand, Czeshire...whatever raises a smile.
      >
      > Not very fussed either way, myself.
      >
      > Formally, my default mode is still to translate Cesko as Czech
      > Republic, unless the client has strong opinions on the subject.
      >
      > BR
      >
      > M.
      >
      > From the great Czechlist Czechia debate of 2004:
      > To the tune of "Everything's Free in America":
      >
      > Czechia, Czechia, Czechia,
      > Not quite as far as Uzbekia,
      > Turn left at Ruritania,
      > Don't stop in Transylvania.
      >
      > Czechia, Czechia, Czechia,
      > Nothing to do with Uzbekia,
      > Won't find a name that's much tackier,
      > Maybe except for Slovakia.
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      >
    • James Kirchner
      Thanks, Josef and Gerry. My hunch is now that this abbreviation is, in fact, document specific and doesn t call for translation. Jamie ... [Non-text portions
      Message 62 of 62 , Sep 6, 2008
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        Thanks, Josef and Gerry. My hunch is now that this abbreviation is,
        in fact, document specific and doesn't call for translation.

        Jamie

        On Sep 6, 2008, at 3:15 AM, Josef Hlavac wrote:

        > This is most likely a very specific jargon or a document-specific
        > abbreviation. Maybe even a brand/model designation. Certainly not a
        > commonly recognized abbreviation, not even in elec engineering.
        >
        > Josef
        >
        > James Kirchner wrote:
        > > Can anyone tell me what "DM" stands for in "DM ovladac" in an
        > > electrical appliance?
        > >
        > > Thanks.
        > >
        > > Jamie
        > >
        > >
        > > ------------------------------------
        > >
        > > Translators' tricks of the trade:
        > > http://czeng.wetpaint.com/
        > >
        > >
        > >
        > >
        > > Yahoo! Groups Links
        > >
        > >
        > >
        >
        >



        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
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