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Re: [Czechlist] Re: English Marketing Speak?

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  • James Kirchner
    As a non-engineer, that s how I first interpreted it too. I just thought it might be a clumsy choice of symbolism. Jamie ... [Non-text portions of this
    Message 1 of 9 , Feb 15, 2008
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      As a non-engineer, that's how I first interpreted it too. I just
      thought it might be a clumsy choice of symbolism.

      Jamie

      On Feb 15, 2008, at 8:35 AM, Josef Hlavac wrote:

      > As an engineer, I confirm - the "invention of the zero" idea was the
      > first thing that came to my mind. Especially given the "redefining
      > mathematics" part.
      >
      > Josef
      >
      > coilinoc wrote:
      > > That's precisely how I interpreted it as well. It's not so
      > terrible if
      > > that's what they mean.
      > > Mind you, I only knew about the "infernal nought" thing because a
      > few
      > > years back I heard a BBC documentary about it and how the crusaders
      > > bringing back the 0 completely changed the intellectual climate in
      > the
      > > West.
      > > Perhaps the target audience of this text (engineers, programmers?)
      > > would have known this as a matter of course and got the reference
      > > straight away...?
      > > C.
      > > --- In Czechlist@yahoogroups.com, "melvyn.geo" <zehrovak@...> wrote:
      > >> OK I am guessing here for lack of context, but I think there MAY
      > just
      > >> be an idea lurking _behind the text_ as you say.
      > >>
      > >> Could it be that they are referring to the idea that the Romans did
      > >> not have a symbol for zero and that some clever clogs was
      > _supposedly_
      > >> bOld enough to subsequently invent the zero symbol and so make
      > >> arithmetic a lot easier*.
      > >>
      > >> Have a careful look at the O in bold. It could even be as corny as
      > >> that. :-)
      > >>
      > >> So I would expand your sentence like this: Someone who dared to
      > give a
      > >> value to nothing (i.e. to invent a symbol for the idea of nothing,
      > >> zero, zilch etc. instead of using a blank space) and who by doing
      > so,
      > >> redefined mathematics - this someone did believe in boldness.
      > >>
      > >> BR
      > >>
      > >> M.
      > >> The actual history of zero is perhaps not as straightforward as
      > that,
      > >> but that is the idea.
      > >> http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/0_(number)#History_of_zero
      > >>
      > >
      > >
      > >
      > >
      > > Translators' tricks of the trade:
      > > http://czeng.wetpaint.com/
      > >
      > >
      > >
      > >
      > >
      > > Yahoo! Groups Links
      > >
      > >
      > >
      >
      >



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