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Emission and immission - revisited

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  • dparrot@volny.cz
    In my opinion, the comment cited below should have beem mentioned previously in this discussion and explains the problem (and it is in line with the
    Message 1 of 3 , Jan 4, 2008
    • 0 Attachment
      In my opinion, the comment cited below should have beem mentioned previously
      in this discussion and explains the problem (and it is in line with
      the Kirchner´s opinion, see below):

      From "Ekologie a ochrana zivotního prostredi", Pavel Krivka a Jiri Ruzicka,
      LOXIA Orague 1999 "

      Immision imise
      V cestine bezne uzivane slovo se v anglictine nepouziva a vyskytuje se
      zpravidla pouze v anglicky psanych textech, ktere sepsali evropsti kontinentalni
      autori. Pri prekladech do anglictiny doporucujeme podle smyslu sdeleni
      prekladat bud jako GROUND-LEVEL CONCENTRATION (OF POLLUTANTS), jedna-li
      se o hodnoty koncentraci skodlivin v prizemni vrstve atmosfery nebo
      jako AIR POLLUTION pokud je slovo IMISE v ceskem textu pozito v obecne
      smyslu ZNECISTENE OVZDUSI, ZNECISTENI OVZDUSI nebo SKODLIVINY V OVZDUSI.
      Pri prekladu shora uvedenych anglickych ekvivalentu do cestiny by naopak
      mel byt termin IMISE dusledne pouzivan.

      Dusan


      Previous message:

      Posted by: "James Kirchner" jpklists@... kirchnerjk
      Thu Jan 3, 2008 4:58 pm (PST)
      We just had a dialogue about this term "immission" a few months ago,

      and someone provided the term that is really used in English.
      "Immission" is seldom seen in English, and you never hear it in
      speech, because it can sound exactly like the word "emission".

      It's similar to the way "aural" is almost never heard, because in most

      dialects it sounds just like "oral".

      If you look up "immission" in the Czechlist archives, you should find

      the correct term.

      Jamie

      On Jan 3, 2008, at 7:46 PM, Romana Vlcek wrote:

      > Immission is a correct and generally known environmental term. There
      >
      > > is no problem at all with using it.
      > http://www.dict.cc/?s=immission
      >
      > Romana
      >
      > ----- Original Message -----
      > From: Bedrich Hadziu
      > To: Czechlist@yahoogroups.com
      > Sent: Friday, January 04, 2008 2:20 AM
      > Subject: Re: [Czechlist] TERM: Envioronmental: emise a imise
      >
      > "IMISE / IMMISSION" is one of those ecologisms (ecological
      > neologisms), isn't it?
      >
      > I am sure that the GORACLE (that is how some zealous followers title
      >
      > > Al Gore), as a Nobel Prize winner, would know the right terms for it
      >
      > > in all of the Earth's languages.
      >
      > Even though he has won the prize for peace-making, not for
      > science... :-)
      >
      > Bedrich
      >
      > James Kirchner <jpklists@...> wrote:
      >
      > On Dec 10, 2007, at 6:29 AM, kzgafas wrote:
      >
      > > Is it possible to translate imise as immission into English? Is it
      > >
      > > > an
      > > English term used in this meaning at all?
      >
      > An average person walking down the street would not know this term,
      > > and I see that the majority of definitions on the web are in German.
      > > Wikipedia has no English entry on it, and Dictionary.com finds it in
      > > only one American dictionary (Webster's Revised Unabridged). All that
      > > tells me that it's not a good word to use.
      >
      > So what should you use? Here is something I found in a medical
      > dictionary:
      >
      > > 1. Environmental concentration of a pollutant, resulting from a
      > > combination of immissions and dispersals; often synonymous with
      > > exposure.
      > http://www.medilexicon.com/medicaldictionary.php?t=43643
      >
      > So I guess it might be possible to say "exposure" in some contexts.
      > > If a pollutant is being immitted, we generally say that the pollutant
      > > is being "introduced" to the environment, so "emission" and
      > "introduction" can be used in some situations.
      >
      > I don't think the word "immission" has a bright future in English,
      > and
      > > the reason it's not used much is probably because in the flow of
      > English speech it would be pronounced almost exactly the same as
      > "emission". It would be like the pair "oral" and "aural". Most
      > people pronounce them the same, so "aural" has nearly disappeared.
      >
      > Jamie
    • Romana Vlcek
      Dear colleagues, I am not happy about having to oppose the prevalent opinion in this forum, and I agree that immission is probably hardly ever used in
      Message 2 of 3 , Jan 4, 2008
      • 0 Attachment
        Dear colleagues,

        I am not happy about having to oppose the prevalent opinion in this forum,
        and I agree that "immission" is probably hardly ever used in colloquial
        English; however, it is an absolutely valid and inexchangeable technical
        English term in the environmental sciences as well as in legal contexts.
        Please double-check at least a few of the over 33,000 Google entries under
        the link below:

        http://www.google.com.au/search?as_q=immission&hl=en&num=10&btnG=Google+Search&as_epq=&as_oq=&as_eq=&lr=lang_en&cr=&as_ft=i&as_filetype=&as_qdr=all&as_occt=any&as_dt=i&as_sitesearch=&as_rights=&safe=images

        Best regards,

        Romana


        ----- Original Message -----
        From: <dparrot@...>
        To: <czechlist@yahoogroups.com>
        Sent: Saturday, January 05, 2008 5:09 AM
        Subject: [Czechlist] Emission and immission - revisited


        In my opinion, the comment cited below should have beem mentioned previously
        in this discussion and explains the problem (and it is in line with
        the Kirchner´s opinion, see below):

        From "Ekologie a ochrana zivotního prostredi", Pavel Krivka a Jiri Ruzicka,
        LOXIA Orague 1999 "

        Immision imise
        V cestine bezne uzivane slovo se v anglictine nepouziva a vyskytuje se
        zpravidla pouze v anglicky psanych textech, ktere sepsali evropsti
        kontinentalni
        autori. Pri prekladech do anglictiny doporucujeme podle smyslu sdeleni
        prekladat bud jako GROUND-LEVEL CONCENTRATION (OF POLLUTANTS), jedna-li
        se o hodnoty koncentraci skodlivin v prizemni vrstve atmosfery nebo
        jako AIR POLLUTION pokud je slovo IMISE v ceskem textu pozito v obecne
        smyslu ZNECISTENE OVZDUSI, ZNECISTENI OVZDUSI nebo SKODLIVINY V OVZDUSI.
        Pri prekladu shora uvedenych anglickych ekvivalentu do cestiny by naopak
        mel byt termin IMISE dusledne pouzivan.

        Dusan


        Previous message:

        Posted by: "James Kirchner" jpklists@... kirchnerjk
        Thu Jan 3, 2008 4:58 pm (PST)
        We just had a dialogue about this term "immission" a few months ago,

        and someone provided the term that is really used in English.
        "Immission" is seldom seen in English, and you never hear it in
        speech, because it can sound exactly like the word "emission".

        It's similar to the way "aural" is almost never heard, because in most

        dialects it sounds just like "oral".

        If you look up "immission" in the Czechlist archives, you should find

        the correct term.

        Jamie

        On Jan 3, 2008, at 7:46 PM, Romana Vlcek wrote:

        > Immission is a correct and generally known environmental term. There
        >
        > > is no problem at all with using it.
        > http://www.dict.cc/?s=immission
        >
        > Romana
        >
        > ----- Original Message -----
        > From: Bedrich Hadziu
        > To: Czechlist@yahoogroups.com
        > Sent: Friday, January 04, 2008 2:20 AM
        > Subject: Re: [Czechlist] TERM: Envioronmental: emise a imise
        >
        > "IMISE / IMMISSION" is one of those ecologisms (ecological
        > neologisms), isn't it?
        >
        > I am sure that the GORACLE (that is how some zealous followers title
        >
        > > Al Gore), as a Nobel Prize winner, would know the right terms for it
        >
        > > in all of the Earth's languages.
        >
        > Even though he has won the prize for peace-making, not for
        > science... :-)
        >
        > Bedrich
        >
        > James Kirchner <jpklists@...> wrote:
        >
        > On Dec 10, 2007, at 6:29 AM, kzgafas wrote:
        >
        > > Is it possible to translate imise as immission into English? Is it
        > >
        > > > an
        > > English term used in this meaning at all?
        >
        > An average person walking down the street would not know this term,
        > > and I see that the majority of definitions on the web are in German.
        > > Wikipedia has no English entry on it, and Dictionary.com finds it in
        > > only one American dictionary (Webster's Revised Unabridged). All that
        > > tells me that it's not a good word to use.
        >
        > So what should you use? Here is something I found in a medical
        > dictionary:
        >
        > > 1. Environmental concentration of a pollutant, resulting from a
        > > combination of immissions and dispersals; often synonymous with
        > > exposure.
        > http://www.medilexicon.com/medicaldictionary.php?t=43643
        >
        > So I guess it might be possible to say "exposure" in some contexts.
        > > If a pollutant is being immitted, we generally say that the pollutant
        > > is being "introduced" to the environment, so "emission" and
        > "introduction" can be used in some situations.
        >
        > I don't think the word "immission" has a bright future in English,
        > and
        > > the reason it's not used much is probably because in the flow of
        > English speech it would be pronounced almost exactly the same as
        > "emission". It would be like the pair "oral" and "aural". Most
        > people pronounce them the same, so "aural" has nearly disappeared.
        >
        > Jamie




        Translators' tricks of the trade:
        http://czeng.wetpaint.com/





        Yahoo! Groups Links




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      • James Kirchner
        Romana, look at the suffixed domains on most of the sites that are not .com , .org , and .edu , and you ll notice that most of them are in continental
        Message 3 of 3 , Jan 4, 2008
        • 0 Attachment
          Romana, look at the suffixed domains on most of the sites that are not
          ".com", ".org", and ".edu", and you'll notice that most of them are in
          continental Europe. If you open the ones whose URLs don't have
          identifiable nationalities, you'll find that the authors of the papers
          or articles are always French, German, Dutch, Swedish or from some
          other country with its own type of non-English English.

          I did a dictionary search of the word and found it in only one
          dictionary, which is the Webster's Revised Unabridged. This means
          it's not even acknowledged as being in common use by most dictionaries.

          The continental Europeans and the Brusselese can say "immission",
          "harmonization" (for coordination) and "mobbing" (for harassment) all
          they want, but that still doesn't make them normal English.

          Jamie


          On Jan 4, 2008, at 7:58 PM, Romana Vlcek wrote:

          > Dear colleagues,
          >
          > I am not happy about having to oppose the prevalent opinion in this
          > forum,
          > and I agree that "immission" is probably hardly ever used in
          > colloquial
          > English; however, it is an absolutely valid and inexchangeable
          > technical
          > English term in the environmental sciences as well as in legal
          > contexts.
          > Please double-check at least a few of the over 33,000 Google entries
          > under
          > the link below:
          >
          > http://www.google.com.au/search?as_q=immission&hl=en&num=10&btnG=Google+Search&as_epq=&as_oq=&as_eq=&lr=lang_en&cr=&as_ft=i&as_filetype=&as_qdr=all&as_occt=any&as_dt=i&as_sitesearch=&as_rights=&safe=images
          >
          > Best regards,
          >
          > Romana
          >
          >
          > ----- Original Message -----
          > From: <dparrot@...>
          > To: <czechlist@yahoogroups.com>
          > Sent: Saturday, January 05, 2008 5:09 AM
          > Subject: [Czechlist] Emission and immission - revisited
          >
          >
          > In my opinion, the comment cited below should have beem mentioned
          > previously
          > in this discussion and explains the problem (and it is in line with
          > the Kirchner´s opinion, see below):
          >
          > From "Ekologie a ochrana zivotního prostredi", Pavel Krivka a Jiri
          > Ruzicka,
          > LOXIA Orague 1999 "
          >
          > Immision imise
          > V cestine bezne uzivane slovo se v anglictine nepouziva a vyskytuje se
          > zpravidla pouze v anglicky psanych textech, ktere sepsali evropsti
          > kontinentalni
          > autori. Pri prekladech do anglictiny doporucujeme podle smyslu sdeleni
          > prekladat bud jako GROUND-LEVEL CONCENTRATION (OF POLLUTANTS), jedna-
          > li
          > se o hodnoty koncentraci skodlivin v prizemni vrstve atmosfery nebo
          > jako AIR POLLUTION pokud je slovo IMISE v ceskem textu pozito v obecne
          > smyslu ZNECISTENE OVZDUSI, ZNECISTENI OVZDUSI nebo SKODLIVINY V
          > OVZDUSI.
          > Pri prekladu shora uvedenych anglickych ekvivalentu do cestiny by
          > naopak
          > mel byt termin IMISE dusledne pouzivan.
          >
          > Dusan
          >
          >
          > Previous message:
          >
          > Posted by: "James Kirchner" jpklists@... kirchnerjk
          > Thu Jan 3, 2008 4:58 pm (PST)
          > We just had a dialogue about this term "immission" a few months ago,
          >
          > and someone provided the term that is really used in English.
          > "Immission" is seldom seen in English, and you never hear it in
          > speech, because it can sound exactly like the word "emission".
          >
          > It's similar to the way "aural" is almost never heard, because in most
          >
          > dialects it sounds just like "oral".
          >
          > If you look up "immission" in the Czechlist archives, you should find
          >
          > the correct term.
          >
          > Jamie
          >
          > On Jan 3, 2008, at 7:46 PM, Romana Vlcek wrote:
          >
          >> Immission is a correct and generally known environmental term. There
          >>
          >>> is no problem at all with using it.
          >> http://www.dict.cc/?s=immission
          >>
          >> Romana
          >>
          >> ----- Original Message -----
          >> From: Bedrich Hadziu
          >> To: Czechlist@yahoogroups.com
          >> Sent: Friday, January 04, 2008 2:20 AM
          >> Subject: Re: [Czechlist] TERM: Envioronmental: emise a imise
          >>
          >> "IMISE / IMMISSION" is one of those ecologisms (ecological
          >> neologisms), isn't it?
          >>
          >> I am sure that the GORACLE (that is how some zealous followers title
          >>
          >>> Al Gore), as a Nobel Prize winner, would know the right terms for it
          >>
          >>> in all of the Earth's languages.
          >>
          >> Even though he has won the prize for peace-making, not for
          >> science... :-)
          >>
          >> Bedrich
          >>
          >> James Kirchner <jpklists@...> wrote:
          >>
          >> On Dec 10, 2007, at 6:29 AM, kzgafas wrote:
          >>
          >>> Is it possible to translate imise as immission into English? Is it
          >>>
          >>>> an
          >>> English term used in this meaning at all?
          >>
          >> An average person walking down the street would not know this term,
          >>> and I see that the majority of definitions on the web are in German.
          >>> Wikipedia has no English entry on it, and Dictionary.com finds it in
          >>> only one American dictionary (Webster's Revised Unabridged). All
          >>> that
          >>> tells me that it's not a good word to use.
          >>
          >> So what should you use? Here is something I found in a medical
          >> dictionary:
          >>
          >>> 1. Environmental concentration of a pollutant, resulting from a
          >>> combination of immissions and dispersals; often synonymous with
          >>> exposure.
          >> http://www.medilexicon.com/medicaldictionary.php?t=43643
          >>
          >> So I guess it might be possible to say "exposure" in some contexts.
          >>> If a pollutant is being immitted, we generally say that the
          >>> pollutant
          >>> is being "introduced" to the environment, so "emission" and
          >> "introduction" can be used in some situations.
          >>
          >> I don't think the word "immission" has a bright future in English,
          >> and
          >>> the reason it's not used much is probably because in the flow of
          >> English speech it would be pronounced almost exactly the same as
          >> "emission". It would be like the pair "oral" and "aural". Most
          >> people pronounce them the same, so "aural" has nearly disappeared.
          >>
          >> Jamie
          >
          >
          >
          >
          > Translators' tricks of the trade:
          > http://czeng.wetpaint.com/
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          > Yahoo! Groups Links
          >
          >
          >
          >
          > __________ Information from ESET Smart Security, version of virus
          > signature
          > database 2740 (20071221) __________
          >
          > The message was checked by ESET Smart Security.
          >
          > http://www.eset.com
          >
          >
          >
          >
          > Translators' tricks of the trade:
          > http://czeng.wetpaint.com/
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          > Yahoo! Groups Links
          >
          >
          >
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