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Re: [Czechlist] Salespeople slang: rip-out

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  • James Kirchner
    Right. What you re saying now is plausible. I think you had the right idea. Jamie ... [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    Message 1 of 5 , Dec 8, 2007
      Right. What you're saying now is plausible. I think you had the
      right idea.

      Jamie

      On Dec 8, 2007, at 9:35 AM, Matej Klimes wrote:

      > Hi Jamie,
      >
      > I should probably have explained the context:
      >
      > ATG, the company whose sales materials this comes from, is a
      > supplier of e-commerce applications, they sell software that helps
      > online retailers such as stamps.com, or anybody else who sells stuff
      > on Internet manage their catalogues, publish content, etc. etc.
      >
      > The context suggests that a rip-out is when you talk to a customer
      > (online retailer) and manage to persuade them to "rip-out" their
      > existing application/environment by someone else from their
      > computers and replace it by something your product...
      >
      > In a FAQ part of the doc, there's a heading which goes:
      >
      > "It would cost us too much to rip-out our current solution" As in
      > we've just invested this and this much into someone else's solution
      > and you want us to pay even more for yours...
      >
      > Does it sound plausible now? It's probably limited to IT industry,
      > comes from IT people's slang but is now used by sales? Just wanted
      > to make sure I understood..
      >
      > Thanks
      >
      > Matej
      >
      > ----- Original Message -----
      > From: James Kirchner
      > To: Czechlist@yahoogroups.com
      > Sent: Saturday, December 08, 2007 3:18 PM
      > Subject: Re: [Czechlist] Salespeople slang: rip-out
      >
      > I used to work on mountains of sales training materials at a company
      > that produced them, but this rip-out expression is new and mystifies
      > me.
      >
      > Usually, winning a customer from a competitor is called "conquesting"
      > him, and the process is called "conquest sales".
      >
      > This "rip out" sounds stranger, because it looks as if there were no
      > conquesting involved and as if there were some kind of technological
      > process at work.
      >
      > It can't be winning customers away in the normal sense, because if you
      > go to Stamps.com, you'll see that there's nothing there that would
      > allow another vendor to hijack the sale.
      >
      > The phrase "that are live" also adds confusion to the whole thing and
      > leads me to believe the "rip-out" is some kind of banner ad or
      > something similar.
      >
      > I don't know what "rip out" means in this context, but I can tell that
      > it's not exactly about winning a customer over in the usual way.
      >
      > Jamie
      >
      > On Dec 8, 2007, at 8:59 AM, Matej Klimes wrote:
      >
      > > Hi list,
      > >
      > > Am I right in imagining, that in sales training context, to rip-out
      > > means to take-over a customer previously using a competitor's
      > product?
      > >
      > > Usage:
      > >
      > > ATG has no rip-outs against BM that are live.
      > > This is why legacy BV Commerce customers are great rip-out targets.
      > > ATG just ripped them out at Stamps.com
      > > Both have ATG rip-out stories and they have been attacking our
      > > install base for the past three years
      > >
      > > etc.
      > >
      > > Thanks for confirming
      > >
      > > Matej
      > >
      > > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      > >
      > >
      > >
      >
      > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      >
      > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      >
      >
      >



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