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Re: [Czechlist]

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  • Jaroslav Hejzlar
    Ahoj, možná vymožení pohledávky prostřednictvím převedení příslušné částky z bankovního účtu . S pozdravem, Jarda ... From: Šárka
    Message 1 of 7 , Dec 6, 2007
      Ahoj,
      možná "vymožení pohledávky prostřednictvím převedení příslušné částky z
      bankovního účtu".
      S pozdravem,
      Jarda


      ----- Original Message -----
      From: "Šárka Rubková" <rubkova@...>
      To: <Czechlist@yahoogroups.com>
      Sent: Thursday, December 06, 2007 9:26 PM
      Subject: RE: [Czechlist]


      Ahoj,

      nějak nevím, jak tohle přeložit:

      enforcement by means of assignment of a receivable from a bank account


      <http://geo.yahoo.com/serv?s=97359714/grpId=328964/grpspId=1705043588/msgId=
      35025/stime=1196950904/nc1=4836039/nc2=4706132/nc3=4840958> Dík
      sarka



      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]



      Translators' tricks of the trade:
      http://czeng.wetpaint.com/





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    • Veselý Petr
      Hi folks, This a question targeted at native speakers. I have been reading a spy novel where the author constantly refers to Iraq (and once also to the US, but
      Message 2 of 7 , Dec 6, 2007
        Hi folks,

        This a question targeted at native speakers.
        I have been reading a spy novel where the author constantly refers to Iraq
        (and once also to the US, but not 100% sure) as "she". Why? What is it that
        the "she" reference conveys unlike the standard "it" reference?

        Petr
      • Matej Klimes
        Same reason for which people refer to cars, boats and other objects of passion as SHE (althought I was once told it wasn t true for boats here, it is, and not
        Message 3 of 7 , Dec 6, 2007
          Same reason for which people refer to cars, boats and other objects of
          passion as SHE (althought I was once told it wasn't true for boats here, it
          is, and not limited to posers...).

          With countries, it's certainly not limited to Iraq, "she England" is quite
          easy to encounter on radio and TV, in the case of the US I think it's less
          common because the usage is a bit old-fashioned and European by design..
          which is probably why it was used in the spy novel (if written by a
          Westerner) for an Arab person's lines - the well-educated Arab with RP
          English and 19th Century manners cliche

          M


          ----- Original Message -----
          From: "Veselý Petr" <vesely.email@...>
          To: <Czechlist@yahoogroups.com>
          Sent: Friday, December 07, 2007 7:38 AM
          Subject: [Czechlist] "She" (instead of "it") reference to countries


          > Hi folks,
          >
          > This a question targeted at native speakers.
          > I have been reading a spy novel where the author constantly refers to Iraq
          > (and once also to the US, but not 100% sure) as "she". Why? What is it
          > that
          > the "she" reference conveys unlike the standard "it" reference?
          >
          > Petr
          >
          >
          >
          > Translators' tricks of the trade:
          > http://czeng.wetpaint.com/
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          > Yahoo! Groups Links
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
        • Veselý Petr
          The thing is, the she reference to Iraq (the enemy) is made by Anglo-Saxons, who do not have any personal bonds to that country. I am somehow reluctant to
          Message 4 of 7 , Dec 7, 2007
            The thing is, the "she" reference to Iraq (the enemy) is made by
            Anglo-Saxons, who do not have any personal bonds to that country. I am
            somehow reluctant to believe that this usage falls within the same category
            as the "she" reference to cars, boats, etc. Any native can comment on it?

            Petr

            ----- Original Message -----
            From: "Matej Klimes" <mklimes@...>
            To: <Czechlist@yahoogroups.com>
            Sent: Friday, December 07, 2007 8:45 AM
            Subject: Re: [Czechlist] "She" (instead of "it") reference to countries


            > Same reason for which people refer to cars, boats and other objects of
            > passion as SHE (althought I was once told it wasn't true for boats here,
            > it
            > is, and not limited to posers...).
            >
            > With countries, it's certainly not limited to Iraq, "she England" is quite
            > easy to encounter on radio and TV, in the case of the US I think it's less
            > common because the usage is a bit old-fashioned and European by design..
            > which is probably why it was used in the spy novel (if written by a
            > Westerner) for an Arab person's lines - the well-educated Arab with RP
            > English and 19th Century manners cliche
            >
            > M
            >
            >
            > ----- Original Message -----
            > From: "Veselý Petr" <vesely.email@...>
            > To: <Czechlist@yahoogroups.com>
            > Sent: Friday, December 07, 2007 7:38 AM
            > Subject: [Czechlist] "She" (instead of "it") reference to countries
            >
            >
            >> Hi folks,
            >>
            >> This a question targeted at native speakers.
            >> I have been reading a spy novel where the author constantly refers to
            >> Iraq
            >> (and once also to the US, but not 100% sure) as "she". Why? What is it
            >> that
            >> the "she" reference conveys unlike the standard "it" reference?
            >>
            >> Petr
            >>
            >>
            >>
            >> Translators' tricks of the trade:
            >> http://czeng.wetpaint.com/
            >>
            >>
            >>
            >>
            >>
            >> Yahoo! Groups Links
            >>
            >>
            >>
            >>
            >>
            >
            >
            >
            >
            > Translators' tricks of the trade:
            > http://czeng.wetpaint.com/
            >
            >
            >
            >
            >
            > Yahoo! Groups Links
            >
            >
            >
            >
          • melvyn.geo
            I d say that this personification of countries is traditionally fairly common in some styles and genres and that it does not involve any particularly strong
            Message 5 of 7 , Dec 7, 2007
              I'd say that this personification of countries is traditionally fairly
              common in some styles and genres and that it does not involve any
              particularly strong emotional colouring or expressive charge. It's
              just traditional.

              Michael Swan notes: "We can use 'she' for countries, but 'it' is more
              common in modern English. (Practical English Usage p. 219)

              Libuse Duskova: Casto se odkazuje zajmena 'she', 'her' atd na jmena
              zemi a mest (zejmena v jazyce zurnalistickem). (Mluvnice soucasne
              anglictiny na pozadi cestiny p. 87).

              M.


              --- In Czechlist@yahoogroups.com, Veselý Petr <vesely.email@...> wrote:
              >
              > The thing is, the "she" reference to Iraq (the enemy) is made by
              > Anglo-Saxons, who do not have any personal bonds to that country. I am
              > somehow reluctant to believe that this usage falls within the same
              category
              > as the "she" reference to cars, boats, etc. Any native can comment
              on it?
              >
              > Petr
            • Veselý Petr
              Thanks Melvyn and Matej, Another puzzle solved, now I will sleep well :) Petr ... From: melvyn.geo To: Czechlist@yahoogroups.com Sent: Friday, December 07,
              Message 6 of 7 , Dec 7, 2007
                Thanks Melvyn and Matej,

                Another puzzle solved, now I will sleep well :)

                Petr


                ----- Original Message -----
                From: melvyn.geo
                To: Czechlist@yahoogroups.com
                Sent: Friday, December 07, 2007 12:04 PM
                Subject: [Czechlist] Re: "She" (instead of "it") reference to countries


                I'd say that this personification of countries is traditionally fairly
                common in some styles and genres and that it does not involve any
                particularly strong emotional colouring or expressive charge. It's
                just traditional.

                Michael Swan notes: "We can use 'she' for countries, but 'it' is more
                common in modern English. (Practical English Usage p. 219)

                Libuse Duskova: Casto se odkazuje zajmena 'she', 'her' atd na jmena
                zemi a mest (zejmena v jazyce zurnalistickem). (Mluvnice soucasne
                anglictiny na pozadi cestiny p. 87).

                M.

                --- In Czechlist@yahoogroups.com, Veselý Petr <vesely.email@...> wrote:
                >
                > The thing is, the "she" reference to Iraq (the enemy) is made by
                > Anglo-Saxons, who do not have any personal bonds to that country. I am
                > somehow reluctant to believe that this usage falls within the same
                category
                > as the "she" reference to cars, boats, etc. Any native can comment
                on it?
                >
                > Petr





                [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
              • Šárka Rubková
                Dík Jardo, Nakonec (asi po dvou stránkách) jmenovali paragraf zákona ze kterého vycházeli, tak jsem si ho našla a zmíněná fráze byla překlad této
                Message 7 of 7 , Dec 8, 2007
                  Dík Jardo,
                  Nakonec (asi po dvou stránkách) jmenovali paragraf zákona ze kterého
                  vycházeli, tak jsem si ho našla a zmíněná fráze byla překlad této české
                  šílenosti:

                  přikázání pohledávky na peněžní prostředky na bankovním účtu

                  Dobrý, ne?

                  sarka

                  -----Original Message-----
                  From: Czechlist@yahoogroups.com [mailto:Czechlist@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf
                  Of Jaroslav Hejzlar
                  Sent: Thursday, December 06, 2007 9:36 PM
                  To: Czechlist@yahoogroups.com
                  Subject: Re: [Czechlist]

                  Ahoj,
                  možná "vymožení pohledávky prostřednictvím převedení příslušné částky z
                  bankovního účtu".
                  S pozdravem,
                  Jarda


                  ----- Original Message -----
                  From: "Šárka Rubková" <rubkova@...>
                  To: <Czechlist@yahoogroups.com>
                  Sent: Thursday, December 06, 2007 9:26 PM
                  Subject: RE: [Czechlist]


                  Ahoj,

                  nějak nevím, jak tohle přeložit:

                  enforcement by means of assignment of a receivable from a bank account


                  <http://geo.yahoo.com/serv?s=97359714/grpId=328964/grpspId=1705043588/msgId=
                  35025/stime=1196950904/nc1=4836039/nc2=4706132/nc3=4840958> Dík
                  sarka



                  [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]



                  Translators' tricks of the trade:
                  http://czeng.wetpaint.com/





                  Yahoo! Groups Links





                  Translators' tricks of the trade:
                  http://czeng.wetpaint.com/





                  Yahoo! Groups Links





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