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CHAT: Business partner

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  • Tomáš Skřont
    Dear Czechlistmates, I studied famous English or Czenglish book by Don Sparling a few weeks ago again to find out whether I still remember all the use
    Message 1 of 5 , Nov 3, 2000
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      Dear Czechlistmates,

      I studied famous "English or Czenglish" book by Don Sparling a few weeks ago
      again to find out whether I still remember all the use information he
      provides.

      I would like to hear your views on the term "business partner".

      Sparling says:
      A business partner je spolumajitel podniku, nikoliv obchodní partner.

      However, while translating documents from English into Czech I often find
      the word business partner where "spolumajitel podniku" or "spolecnik" just
      does fit and it has to translated as "obchodni partner". Of course, such
      documents may have been written by Czech citizens. Can you please comment?

      Here is an example taken out of the translation I am translating right now:
      "the Bosch EXPO project group also welcomed 8,000 invited customers,
      suppliers and business partners from approximately 50 different countries".

      TIA for your effort,

      *******************************************************************
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      cheap, quick and reliable freelance Czech<>English translator

      Kurzova 12/2224, 155 00 Prague 5, Czech Rep.
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    • Jolana Machalek
      Ahoj Tomá¹i, In your example the translation is clearly obchodní partneøi . A business partner is translated as spoleèník if it is a co-owner of your
      Message 2 of 5 , Nov 3, 2000
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        Ahoj Tomáši,

        In your example the translation is clearly "obchodní partneři". A business
        partner is translated as "společník" if it is a co-owner of your company. If
        it is somebody (e.g., other company, firm, sole proprietor, or freelancer)
        you do business with, than the translation is "obchodní partner". That's how
        I understand it.

        Happy translating,

        Jolana
      • JPKIRCHNER@aol.com
        Business partner has two meanings in current lingo: 1. spolumajitel podniku 2. obchodni partner So, a business partner is either a person who owns a business
        Message 3 of 5 , Nov 3, 2000
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          Business partner has two meanings in current lingo:

          1. spolumajitel podniku

          2. obchodni partner

          So, a business partner is either a person who owns a business with you (this
          usually in the case of small, privately owned businesses), or a person you do
          business with. I think the obchodni partner meaning would be used more by
          businesses on a corporate level, where the spolumajitele are the
          shareholders. So, Ford may refer to Visteon as a business partner, because
          they work together on projects. Car companies often refer to their outside
          OEM suppliers as business partners.

          Jamie
        • Michael Grant
          ... I think the giveaway is the mention of Bosch. Germans tend to use Partner in a manner similar to Czechs, so it creeps into the English of people who do
          Message 4 of 5 , Nov 3, 2000
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            >Here is an example taken out of the translation I am translating right now:
            >"the Bosch EXPO project group also welcomed 8,000 invited customers,
            >suppliers and business partners from approximately 50 different countries".

            I think the giveaway is the mention of Bosch. Germans tend to use
            "Partner" in a manner similar to Czechs, so it creeps into the
            English of people who do business in Germany, even if the texts are
            written by native English speakers.
            FWIW, I like "associate" in this context, although it doesn't have
            the warm-fuzzy all-in-this-together connotations of "partner".

            Michael

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          • JPKIRCHNER@aol.com
            ... I think this is universal to the corporate world, and especially to the automotive industry, not just to those dealing with Germany. ... The trouble with
            Message 5 of 5 , Nov 3, 2000
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              In a message dated 11/3/00 9:13:38 AM, mgrant@... writes:

              >I think the giveaway is the mention of Bosch. Germans tend to use
              >"Partner" in a manner similar to Czechs, so it creeps into the
              >English of people who do business in Germany, even if the texts are
              >written by native English speakers.

              I think this is universal to the corporate world, and especially to the
              automotive industry, not just to those dealing with Germany.

              >FWIW, I like "associate" in this context, although it doesn't have
              >the warm-fuzzy all-in-this-together connotations of "partner".

              The trouble with "associate" is that, since the rise of Walmart, it has come
              to mean the same thing as "employee", especially a low-level employee, like a
              cashier.

              Jamie
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