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Re: [Czechlist] Help: longovany

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  • Jennifer Hejtmankova
    long drink is a perfectly normal English expression...... http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Long_drink (not that wiki is the be all end all, but most of the time
    Message 1 of 19 , Jun 7, 2007
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      long drink is a perfectly normal English expression......

      http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Long_drink

      (not that wiki is the be all end all, but most of the time it's
      pretty correct)

      On 7.6.2007, at 13:10, James Kirchner wrote:

      > Can a glass be long? Can a drink be long? I thought that both the
      > glass and the drink were tall and that a sausage or a dachshund was
      > long.
      >
      > I always thought "long drink" was Czenglish, similar to the misuse of
      > "ice cream cup".
      >
      > What do the other native speakers say?
      >
      > Jamie
      >
      > On Jun 7, 2007, at 5:20 AM, coilinoc wrote:
      >
      > > Hi there,
      > > Any ideas what this presumable borrowing from English means
      > precisely?
      > >
      > > Two items on a drinks menu:
      > > Kir longovanou Gancii nebo Dobonnetem.
      > > Longovane champagne
      > >
      > > Do they simply mean served in a long glass?
      > >
      > > MTIA
      > > Coilin
      > >
      > >
      > >
      >
      > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      >
      >
      >



      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • Jan Culka
      Thanks, Jenny H. ... From: Jennifer Hejtmankova To: Czechlist@yahoogroups.com Sent: Thursday, June 07, 2007 1:18 PM Subject: Re: [Czechlist] Help: longovany
      Message 2 of 19 , Jun 7, 2007
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        Thanks, Jenny
        H.

        ----- Original Message -----
        From: Jennifer Hejtmankova
        To: Czechlist@yahoogroups.com
        Sent: Thursday, June 07, 2007 1:18 PM
        Subject: Re: [Czechlist] Help: longovany


        long drink is a perfectly normal English expression......

        http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Long_drink

        (not that wiki is the be all end all, but most of the time it's
        pretty correct)

        On 7.6.2007, at 13:10, James Kirchner wrote:

        > Can a glass be long? Can a drink be long? I thought that both the
        > glass and the drink were tall and that a sausage or a dachshund was
        > long.
        >
        > I always thought "long drink" was Czenglish, similar to the misuse of
        > "ice cream cup".
        >
        > What do the other native speakers say?
        >
        > Jamie
        >
        > On Jun 7, 2007, at 5:20 AM, coilinoc wrote:
        >
        > > Hi there,
        > > Any ideas what this presumable borrowing from English means
        > precisely?
        > >
        > > Two items on a drinks menu:
        > > Kir longovanou Gancii nebo Dobonnetem.
        > > Longovane champagne
        > >
        > > Do they simply mean served in a long glass?
        > >
        > > MTIA
        > > Coilin
        > >
        > >
        > >
        >
        > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        >
        >
        >

        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]





        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      • James Kirchner
        REALLY? Did you ever say long drink in the States? I never heard it until I got to the CR. To me, a tall drink sounds like one of those mixed drinks in a
        Message 3 of 19 , Jun 7, 2007
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          REALLY? Did you ever say "long drink" in the States? I never heard
          it until I got to the CR.

          To me, a "tall drink" sounds like one of those mixed drinks in a tall
          glass, and a "long drink" sounds like "glug, glug, glug, glug,
          glug..." The "long drink" sounds like a kid hogging the drinking
          fountain.

          Off the subject of drinks, though, I'd mention to Jan and others that
          "zmrzlinovy pohar" is often mistranslated as "ice cream cup". In
          normal usage, an ice cream cup is one of those Algida-style paper
          cups (or now they often use plastic cups) that comes with a plastic
          spoon or a wooden spatula. If you google "ice cream cup", among
          pictures of other weird things that aren't ice cream, you'll see a
          lot of these paper and plastic cups, but no zmrzlinove pohary. A
          zmrzlinovy pohar is an ice cream sundae.

          Well, that puts to bed another menu item that bugs me.

          Jamie

          On Jun 7, 2007, at 7:18 AM, Jennifer Hejtmankova wrote:

          > long drink is a perfectly normal English expression......
          >
          > http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Long_drink
          >
          > (not that wiki is the be all end all, but most of the time it's
          > pretty correct)
          >
          > On 7.6.2007, at 13:10, James Kirchner wrote:
          >
          > > Can a glass be long? Can a drink be long? I thought that both the
          > > glass and the drink were tall and that a sausage or a dachshund was
          > > long.
          > >
          > > I always thought "long drink" was Czenglish, similar to the
          > misuse of
          > > "ice cream cup".
          > >
          > > What do the other native speakers say?
          > >
          > > Jamie
          > >
          > > On Jun 7, 2007, at 5:20 AM, coilinoc wrote:
          > >
          > > > Hi there,
          > > > Any ideas what this presumable borrowing from English means
          > > precisely?
          > > >
          > > > Two items on a drinks menu:
          > > > Kir longovanou Gancii nebo Dobonnetem.
          > > > Longovane champagne
          > > >
          > > > Do they simply mean served in a long glass?
          > > >
          > > > MTIA
          > > > Coilin
          > > >
          > > >
          > > >
          > >
          > > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          > >
          > >
          > >
          >
          > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          >
          >
          >



          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        • Simon Vollam
          ... Seconded, although I would say that tall glass is more usual than long glass . I prefer shorts myself. Whose round is it? Simon
          Message 4 of 19 , Jun 7, 2007
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            --- In Czechlist@yahoogroups.com, Jennifer Hejtmankova <jenhejt@...>
            wrote:
            >
            > long drink is a perfectly normal English expression......

            Seconded, although I would say that "tall glass" is more usual
            than "long glass".

            I prefer shorts myself. Whose round is it?

            Simon
          • James Kirchner
            Interesting. Dictionary.com has two dictionary entries for tall drink but none for long drink . Hmmmm. JK ... [Non-text portions of this message have been
            Message 5 of 19 , Jun 7, 2007
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              Interesting. Dictionary.com has two dictionary entries for "tall
              drink" but none for "long drink". Hmmmm.

              JK

              On Jun 7, 2007, at 7:35 AM, Simon Vollam wrote:

              > --- In Czechlist@yahoogroups.com, Jennifer Hejtmankova <jenhejt@...>
              > wrote:
              > >
              > > long drink is a perfectly normal English expression......
              >
              > Seconded, although I would say that "tall glass" is more usual
              > than "long glass".
              >
              > I prefer shorts myself. Whose round is it?
              >
              > Simon
              >
              >
              >



              [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
            • Helga Listen
              Leo (HYPERLINK http://www.leo.org/ www.leo.org ) knows long drinks in German and in English (HYPERLINK
              Message 6 of 19 , Jun 7, 2007
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                Leo (HYPERLINK "http://www.leo.org/"www.leo.org ) knows long drinks in
                German and in English (HYPERLINK
                "http://dict.leo.org/ende?lp=ende&p=/gQPU.&search=long+drink"http://dict.leo
                .org/ende?lp=ende&p=/gQPU.&search=long+drink ).

                H.



                _____

                From: Czechlist@yahoogroups.com [mailto:Czechlist@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf
                Of James Kirchner
                Interesting. Dictionary.com has two dictionary entries for "tall
                drink" but none for "long drink". Hmmmm.

                > --- In HYPERLINK
                "mailto:Czechlist%40yahoogroups.com"Czechlist@..., Jennifer
                Hejtmankova <jenhejt@...->
                > wrote:
                > >
                > > long drink is a perfectly normal English expression..-....
                >
                > Seconded, although I would say that "tall glass" is more usual
                > than "long glass".
                >
                > I prefer shorts myself. Whose round is it?
                >
                > Simon




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                [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
              • Jennifer Hejtmankova
                http://www.drinksmixer.com/cat/13/ http://www.onthetable.co.uk/product.php? product=LSA_Long_Drink_Glasses&sproductID=344 Seems to me it s clearly a term that
                Message 7 of 19 , Jun 7, 2007
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                  http://www.drinksmixer.com/cat/13/

                  http://www.onthetable.co.uk/product.php?
                  product=LSA_Long_Drink_Glasses&sproductID=344

                  Seems to me it's clearly a term that used in bartending circles....as
                  is the term "highball"...are they interchangeable?


                  On 7.6.2007, at 13:37, James Kirchner wrote:

                  > Interesting. Dictionary.com has two dictionary entries for "tall
                  > drink" but none for "long drink". Hmmmm.
                  >
                  > JK
                  >
                  > On Jun 7, 2007, at 7:35 AM, Simon Vollam wrote:
                  >
                  > > --- In Czechlist@yahoogroups.com, Jennifer Hejtmankova <jenhejt@...>
                  > > wrote:
                  > > >
                  > > > long drink is a perfectly normal English expression......
                  > >
                  > > Seconded, although I would say that "tall glass" is more usual
                  > > than "long glass".
                  > >
                  > > I prefer shorts myself. Whose round is it?
                  > >
                  > > Simon
                  > >
                  > >
                  > >
                  >
                  > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                  >
                  >
                  >



                  [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                • James Kirchner
                  No, long drink and highball are definitely not interchangeable. A highball is not a long drink , but is usually served in a low glass. It s whiskey and
                  Message 8 of 19 , Jun 7, 2007
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                    No, "long drink" and "highball" are definitely not interchangeable.

                    A highball is not a "long drink", but is usually served in a low
                    glass. It's whiskey and ginger ale with ice added. So it's the name
                    of a specific drink, not of a type of drink.

                    If you guys say that "long drink" is used by native speakers, then it
                    must be used, and I can see it attested in various bartending sites.

                    The mystery, though, is why I can find "tall drink" in real,
                    established dictionaries (American Heritage, Random House,
                    Infoplease, etc.), but not "long drink". I can find "long drink" in
                    Wikipedia, which is not professionally compiled, and in the
                    occasionally Germlish-influenced LEO. Other than that, I've found it
                    only in the Oxford Duden German-English dictionary. The Webster
                    dictionaries list neither of them.

                    Whatever.

                    Jamie

                    On Jun 7, 2007, at 8:07 AM, Jennifer Hejtmankova wrote:

                    > http://www.drinksmixer.com/cat/13/
                    >
                    > http://www.onthetable.co.uk/product.php?
                    > product=LSA_Long_Drink_Glasses&sproductID=344
                    >
                    > Seems to me it's clearly a term that used in bartending circles....as
                    > is the term "highball"...are they interchangeable?
                    >
                    > On 7.6.2007, at 13:37, James Kirchner wrote:
                    >
                    > > Interesting. Dictionary.com has two dictionary entries for "tall
                    > > drink" but none for "long drink". Hmmmm.
                    > >
                    > > JK
                    > >
                    > > On Jun 7, 2007, at 7:35 AM, Simon Vollam wrote:
                    > >
                    > > > --- In Czechlist@yahoogroups.com, Jennifer Hejtmankova
                    > <jenhejt@...>
                    > > > wrote:
                    > > > >
                    > > > > long drink is a perfectly normal English expression......
                    > > >
                    > > > Seconded, although I would say that "tall glass" is more usual
                    > > > than "long glass".
                    > > >
                    > > > I prefer shorts myself. Whose round is it?
                    > > >
                    > > > Simon
                    > > >
                    > > >
                    > > >
                    > >
                    > > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                    > >
                    > >
                    > >
                    >
                    > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                    >
                    >
                    >



                    [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                  • Simon Vollam
                    ... It s in the Oxford Concise, Collins, Cambridge and Chambers dictionaries. Maybe it s another AmE/BrE thing. Simon
                    Message 9 of 19 , Jun 7, 2007
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                      > The mystery, though, is why I can find "tall drink" in real,
                      > established dictionaries (American Heritage, Random House,
                      > Infoplease, etc.), but not "long drink".

                      It's in the Oxford Concise, Collins, Cambridge and Chambers
                      dictionaries. Maybe it's another AmE/BrE thing.

                      Simon
                    • Jennifer Hejtmankova
                      The English language will never cease to befuddle us as it twists and turns and changes over time... It definitely seems to be more of an international
                      Message 10 of 19 , Jun 7, 2007
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                        The English language will never cease to befuddle us as it twists and
                        turns and changes over time...

                        It definitely seems to be more of an "international English" term
                        rather than a purely American or British term, the more I look.
                        I, too, no longer speak or write pure American English (and honestly
                        I can't, as I'm not surrounded by it all day anymore, nor will I be
                        ever again)....

                        linguistically,
                        jennifer

                        p.s. i don't think a "highball" is the name of a specific drink
                        either...i've foudn lots of different kinds of highballs on those
                        bartending sites.... :)

                        On 7.6.2007, at 14:29, James Kirchner wrote:

                        > No, "long drink" and "highball" are definitely not interchangeable.
                        >
                        > A highball is not a "long drink", but is usually served in a low
                        > glass. It's whiskey and ginger ale with ice added. So it's the name
                        > of a specific drink, not of a type of drink.
                        >
                        > If you guys say that "long drink" is used by native speakers, then it
                        > must be used, and I can see it attested in various bartending sites.
                        >
                        > The mystery, though, is why I can find "tall drink" in real,
                        > established dictionaries (American Heritage, Random House,
                        > Infoplease, etc.), but not "long drink". I can find "long drink" in
                        > Wikipedia, which is not professionally compiled, and in the
                        > occasionally Germlish-influenced LEO. Other than that, I've found it
                        > only in the Oxford Duden German-English dictionary. The Webster
                        > dictionaries list neither of them.
                        >
                        > Whatever.
                        >
                        > Jamie
                        >
                        > On Jun 7, 2007, at 8:07 AM, Jennifer Hejtmankova wrote:
                        >
                        > > http://www.drinksmixer.com/cat/13/
                        > >
                        > > http://www.onthetable.co.uk/product.php?
                        > > product=LSA_Long_Drink_Glasses&sproductID=344
                        > >
                        > > Seems to me it's clearly a term that used in bartending
                        > circles....as
                        > > is the term "highball"...are they interchangeable?
                        > >
                        > > On 7.6.2007, at 13:37, James Kirchner wrote:
                        > >
                        > > > Interesting. Dictionary.com has two dictionary entries for "tall
                        > > > drink" but none for "long drink". Hmmmm.
                        > > >
                        > > > JK
                        > > >
                        > > > On Jun 7, 2007, at 7:35 AM, Simon Vollam wrote:
                        > > >
                        > > > > --- In Czechlist@yahoogroups.com, Jennifer Hejtmankova
                        > > <jenhejt@...>
                        > > > > wrote:
                        > > > > >
                        > > > > > long drink is a perfectly normal English expression......
                        > > > >
                        > > > > Seconded, although I would say that "tall glass" is more usual
                        > > > > than "long glass".
                        > > > >
                        > > > > I prefer shorts myself. Whose round is it?
                        > > > >
                        > > > > Simon
                        > > > >
                        > > > >
                        > > > >
                        > > >
                        > > > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                        > > >
                        > > >
                        > > >
                        > >
                        > > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                        > >
                        > >
                        > >
                        >
                        > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                        >
                        >
                        >



                        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                      • James Kirchner
                        I didn t find either term in the Oxford Concise (my edition may be old), although I did find it in another UK dictionary not as an entry, but within
                        Message 11 of 19 , Jun 7, 2007
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                          I didn't find either term in the Oxford Concise (my edition may be
                          old), although I did find it in another UK dictionary not as an
                          entry, but within definitions.

                          JK

                          On Jun 7, 2007, at 8:51 AM, Simon Vollam wrote:

                          > > The mystery, though, is why I can find "tall drink" in real,
                          > > established dictionaries (American Heritage, Random House,
                          > > Infoplease, etc.), but not "long drink".
                          >
                          > It's in the Oxford Concise, Collins, Cambridge and Chambers
                          > dictionaries. Maybe it's another AmE/BrE thing.
                          >
                          > Simon
                          >
                          >
                          >



                          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                        • Simon Vollam
                          ... Mine is old as well - 9th edition. It doesn t merit a separate entry, admittedly, but it s there in definition 12 under long . S.
                          Message 12 of 19 , Jun 7, 2007
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                            --- In Czechlist@yahoogroups.com, James Kirchner <jpklists@...> wrote:
                            >
                            > I didn't find either term in the Oxford Concise (my edition may be
                            > old), although I did find it in another UK dictionary not as an
                            > entry, but within definitions.

                            Mine is old as well - 9th edition. It doesn't merit a separate entry,
                            admittedly, but it's there in definition 12 under "long".

                            S.
                          • James Kirchner
                            ... There are variations on it. However, it s not a generic term for a tall/long drink, and highball is not interchangeable with those terms. JK [Non-text
                            Message 13 of 19 , Jun 7, 2007
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                              On Jun 7, 2007, at 8:56 AM, Jennifer Hejtmankova wrote:

                              > p.s. i don't think a "highball" is the name of a specific drink
                              > either...i've foudn lots of different kinds of highballs on those
                              > bartending sites.... :)

                              There are variations on it. However, it's not a generic term for a
                              tall/long drink, and "highball" is not interchangeable with those terms.

                              JK



                              [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                            • Valerie Talacko
                              ... Very likely. I d say long drink. ... From: Simon Vollam To: Czechlist@yahoogroups.com Sent: Thursday, June 07, 2007 2:51 PM Subject: [Czechlist] Re:
                              Message 14 of 19 , Jun 7, 2007
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                                >Maybe it's another AmE/BrE thing

                                Very likely. I'd say 'long drink.'


                                ----- Original Message -----
                                From: Simon Vollam
                                To: Czechlist@yahoogroups.com
                                Sent: Thursday, June 07, 2007 2:51 PM
                                Subject: [Czechlist] Re: Help: longovany


                                > The mystery, though, is why I can find "tall drink" in real,
                                > established dictionaries (American Heritage, Random House,
                                > Infoplease, etc.), but not "long drink".

                                It's in the Oxford Concise, Collins, Cambridge and Chambers
                                dictionaries. Maybe it's another AmE/BrE thing.

                                Simon





                                [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                              • coilinoc
                                ... Thanks to everyone for their suggestions and comments. Coilin
                                Message 15 of 19 , Jun 8, 2007
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                                  --- In Czechlist@yahoogroups.com, "Valerie Talacko" <valerie@...> wrote:
                                  >
                                  Thanks to everyone for their suggestions and comments.
                                  Coilin

                                  > >Maybe it's another AmE/BrE thing
                                  >
                                  > Very likely. I'd say 'long drink.'
                                  >
                                  >
                                  > ----- Original Message -----
                                  > From: Simon Vollam
                                  > To: Czechlist@yahoogroups.com
                                  > Sent: Thursday, June 07, 2007 2:51 PM
                                  > Subject: [Czechlist] Re: Help: longovany
                                  >
                                  >
                                  > > The mystery, though, is why I can find "tall drink" in real,
                                  > > established dictionaries (American Heritage, Random House,
                                  > > Infoplease, etc.), but not "long drink".
                                  >
                                  > It's in the Oxford Concise, Collins, Cambridge and Chambers
                                  > dictionaries. Maybe it's another AmE/BrE thing.
                                  >
                                  > Simon
                                  >
                                  >
                                  >
                                  >
                                  >
                                  > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                                  >
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