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Re: [Czechlist] Re: Help: Pedagogika volneho casu

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  • James Kirchner
    ... Yes. -- When I moved to the CR, I at first thought that babies I saw on the street were being accompanied by their older sisters, but the girls were their
    Message 1 of 66 , Jun 3, 2007
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      On Jun 3, 2007, at 12:24 PM, Bedrich Hadziu wrote:

      >> "A problem with this term "the third age" in particular -- other than
      >> it sounding like it came from a science fiction novel or a
      >> Scientology tract -- is that the idea of there being "three ages" is
      >> out of kilter with the American view of age and maturation, which is
      >> VERY different from that in France or Eastern Europe."
      >
      > Is it really "out of kilter" with the American view of age and
      > maturation?

      Yes.

      -- When I moved to the CR, I at first thought that babies I saw on
      the street were being accompanied by their older sisters, but the
      girls were their mothers.
      -- When I got home, after having gotten used to the CR for a few
      years, I thought I saw many babies in my neighborhood being pushed
      down the street by their grandmothers, but the women were really
      their mothers.

      -- A Czech woman I knew had her first baby at 34 and was constantly
      getting hassle about having had a child "late", and this prejudice
      sometimes even impaired her access to pediatric medical care. In the
      US, it's not "late" to have a baby at 34, and having one at 40 is not
      odd.

      -- Czech people's children typically start moving out of the house
      when the parents are in their late 30s, but in the US it's when
      they're in their early to mid-50s.

      -- Job seekers in the CR start having trouble with age
      discrimination around age 40, but in the US that doesn't start until
      at least 10 years later.

      -- Czech women start being considered "too old" for marriage
      somewhere in their mid-20s (although the age is certainly creeping up
      now), whereas in the US it's the mid- to late 30s.

      -- Germans (I don't know about Czechs) typically think that in their
      mid-30s they're too old to change careers. Americans change careers
      anytime.

      -- Many Czechs as young as their mid-30s in adult classes complain
      that their brains are "old" and that they can't be expected to learn
      easily. Most Americans don't start talking about this until about
      their 60s.

      -- This is probably also changing, but many Americans have trouble
      discerning Czech people's ages until they've lived in the CR for a
      year or so. The typical explanation from one American to another
      (particularly about the women) has been, "They look 18 for years
      until at a certain age they suddenly look 50." (Obviously, this is
      an exaggeration, but it has some truth.)

      -- A Czech kid took a trip here and wanted me to take him to visit
      the family of his grandfather, whom he'd never met. (His grandfather
      had been a GI in Marianske Lazne at the end of WWII.) The kid told
      me that his grandfather wasn't alive, but that he wanted to visit is
      son. When we got to the house, we found it was not occupied by the
      son, but by the grandfather. Later I asked the kid, "Why did you
      think your grandfather was dead?" He replied, "Because in my
      country, if you're that age, you're dead."

      We view age QUITE differently in the States than elsewhere.

      Jamie



      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • Bedrich Hadziu
      Thank you for the treatise, Jamie. Although it has not changed my opinion about the original issue, you certainly are a prolific GROUP contributor. Take it
      Message 66 of 66 , Jun 6, 2007
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        Thank you for the treatise, Jamie.

        Although it has not changed my opinion about the original issue, you certainly are a prolific GROUP contributor.

        Take it easy!

        Bedrich

        James Kirchner <jpklists@...> wrote:

        On Jun 3, 2007, at 12:24 PM, Bedrich Hadziu wrote:

        >> "A problem with this term "the third age" in particular -- other than
        >> it sounding like it came from a science fiction novel or a
        >> Scientology tract -- is that the idea of there being "three ages" is
        >> out of kilter with the American view of age and maturation, which is
        >> VERY different from that in France or Eastern Europe."
        >
        > Is it really "out of kilter" with the American view of age and
        > maturation?

        Yes.

        -- When I moved to the CR, I at first thought that babies I saw on
        the street were being accompanied by their older sisters, but the
        girls were their mothers.
        -- When I got home, after having gotten used to the CR for a few
        years, I thought I saw many babies in my neighborhood being pushed
        down the street by their grandmothers, but the women were really
        their mothers.

        -- A Czech woman I knew had her first baby at 34 and was constantly
        getting hassle about having had a child "late", and this prejudice
        sometimes even impaired her access to pediatric medical care. In the
        US, it's not "late" to have a baby at 34, and having one at 40 is not
        odd.

        -- Czech people's children typically start moving out of the house
        when the parents are in their late 30s, but in the US it's when
        they're in their early to mid-50s.

        -- Job seekers in the CR start having trouble with age
        discrimination around age 40, but in the US that doesn't start until
        at least 10 years later.

        -- Czech women start being considered "too old" for marriage
        somewhere in their mid-20s (although the age is certainly creeping up
        now), whereas in the US it's the mid- to late 30s.

        -- Germans (I don't know about Czechs) typically think that in their
        mid-30s they're too old to change careers. Americans change careers
        anytime.

        -- Many Czechs as young as their mid-30s in adult classes complain
        that their brains are "old" and that they can't be expected to learn
        easily. Most Americans don't start talking about this until about
        their 60s.

        -- This is probably also changing, but many Americans have trouble
        discerning Czech people's ages until they've lived in the CR for a
        year or so. The typical explanation from one American to another
        (particularly about the women) has been, "They look 18 for years
        until at a certain age they suddenly look 50." (Obviously, this is
        an exaggeration, but it has some truth.)

        -- A Czech kid took a trip here and wanted me to take him to visit
        the family of his grandfather, whom he'd never met. (His grandfather
        had been a GI in Marianske Lazne at the end of WWII.) The kid told
        me that his grandfather wasn't alive, but that he wanted to visit is
        son. When we got to the house, we found it was not occupied by the
        son, but by the grandfather. Later I asked the kid, "Why did you
        think your grandfather was dead?" He replied, "Because in my
        country, if you're that age, you're dead."

        We view age QUITE differently in the States than elsewhere.

        Jamie

        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]






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