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Continuation - something is up with that Seznam

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  • Liz Spacilova
    Okay and now I looked up zakerne and came up with zakerne prepadnout = Jap, pull a jap . I guess if I start coming across lots of slurs in corrections I do, I
    Message 1 of 5 , Apr 29, 2007
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      Okay and now I looked up zakerne and came up with "zakerne prepadnout
      = Jap, pull a jap".

      I guess if I start coming across lots of slurs in corrections I do, I
      shouldn't take them all that seriously.

      But in the meantime ... does anyone know who works on that dictionary?
      I think it's time to be Irish and pull a jap on them.

      Irish Liz
    • James Kirchner
      When a man I knew during my years in the Czech Republic used a conspicuous number of Latinisms and international words, people around him -- educated people
      Message 2 of 5 , Apr 29, 2007
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        When a man I knew during my years in the Czech Republic used a
        conspicuous number of Latinisms and international words, people
        around him -- educated people -- tended to bark at him, "Mluv cesky,
        proboha!" I also noticed that many Czechs who understood the word
        "prevteleni" did not understand the word "reinkarnace". These are
        just two examples I can give that probably won't attract accusations
        that I'm spinning tales (as does my *true* story about an English
        class of well-educated Czechs in which no one understood the word
        "frustrace"). In any case, the Czech lands were the only European
        country I had ever been to where one could not be certain that most
        people would understand international words.

        I have been noticing international words showing up more in the Czech-
        for-foreigners texts now than I saw in the textbooks I learned from.
        The book "New Czech Step by Step", for example, seems never to use
        the word "velvyslanectvi" and some other Czech words that were the
        only words the books taught when I was studying, and instead uses
        "ambasada" and other internationalisms.

        Last night I was listening to the "Clovek a trh" podcast from Cesky
        rozhlas, and it hit me that people in those interviews and in other
        broadcasts use even more Latinisms than would have gotten my friend
        yelled at when I lived in the CR.

        So, my first question is, Has obrozenecky linguistic protectionism
        weakened over the past several years?

        My second question: In the 1990s, the Czech announcers on TV and
        radio tended to sound like eight-pack-a-day smokers, and their
        proclamations were often accompanied by background music that would
        have sounded somewhat odd in the West. Now I notice that radio
        bumper music sounds just like in Germany, and the announcers' voices
        have an almost drugged-up friendly sound to them, making the show IDs
        and station IDs sound exactly like they do on Antenna Bayern. Has
        anyone else noticed this change?

        Jamie
      • kzgafas
        ... The answer might be that 90 s was a very different decade. Examples you have mentioned concerned single word or short expressions. This kind of
        Message 3 of 5 , May 1, 2007
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          --- In Czechlist@yahoogroups.com, James Kirchner <jpklists@...> wrote:
          > So, my first question is, Has obrozenecky linguistic protectionism
          > weakened over the past several years?

          The answer might be that 90's was a very different decade. Examples you
          have mentioned concerned single word or short expressions. This kind of
          protectionism may be on retreat simply becouse it has ceased to be the
          priority. We live in a very different decade now, and the language is
          subject to a very different kind of burden by politicians and media -
          much more serious burden - for instance: implementing specific
          political interests into the language. Who would care in such situation
          about using foreign words?

          K.
        • spektrum2002
          To vsechno podle meho nazoru vyplyva z toho, ze do roku 1989 jsme byli vuci svetu uzavreni a po roce 1989 jsme se otevreli na zapad a zacali sami prejimat
          Message 4 of 5 , May 1, 2007
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            To vsechno podle meho nazoru vyplyva z toho, ze do roku 1989 jsme byli
            vuci svetu uzavreni a po roce 1989 jsme se otevreli na zapad a zacali
            sami prejimat hodne z toho, co na Zapade vidime.
            Muj postreh napriklad je, ze pred rokem 1989 bylo skoro nemyslitelne,
            aby se televizni reporter postavil nekde na ulici a neco povidal a
            kamera tu "talking head" zabirala. Kdyz byly zabery z exterieru,
            vzdycky byl hlas jenom v pozadi a kamera zabirala jenom to prostředi,
            nikdy ne reportera, natoz aby se sot zakoncoval identifikaci
            "Ferdinand Vonasek, Ceska televize, Dolni Lhota".
            Ze se misto "velvyslanectvi" rika "ambasada", je zajimavy postreh. Ja
            jako technik jsem si zase vsiml, ze driv jsme zemetreseni merili na
            "Richterove stupnici", dneska jenom na "Richterove s^ka'le". (Nevim,
            jestli jsem obrozenecky purista, ale mne to vadi.)
            A mimochodem, "mit doma Italii" je velmi bezny obrat, tak jak to ta
            pani vysvetlila.
            Petr Adamek
            --- In Czechlist@yahoogroups.com, James Kirchner <jpklists@...> wrote:
            >
            > When a man I knew during my years in the Czech Republic used a
            > conspicuous number of Latinisms and international words, people
            > around him -- educated people -- tended to bark at him, "Mluv cesky,
            > proboha!" I also noticed that many Czechs who understood the word
            > "prevteleni" did not understand the word "reinkarnace". These are
            > just two examples I can give that probably won't attract accusations
            > that I'm spinning tales (as does my *true* story about an English
            > class of well-educated Czechs in which no one understood the word
            > "frustrace"). In any case, the Czech lands were the only European
            > country I had ever been to where one could not be certain that most
            > people would understand international words.
            >
            > I have been noticing international words showing up more in the Czech-
            > for-foreigners texts now than I saw in the textbooks I learned from.
            > The book "New Czech Step by Step", for example, seems never to use
            > the word "velvyslanectvi" and some other Czech words that were the
            > only words the books taught when I was studying, and instead uses
            > "ambasada" and other internationalisms.
            >
            > Last night I was listening to the "Clovek a trh" podcast from Cesky
            > rozhlas, and it hit me that people in those interviews and in other
            > broadcasts use even more Latinisms than would have gotten my friend
            > yelled at when I lived in the CR.
            >
            > So, my first question is, Has obrozenecky linguistic protectionism
            > weakened over the past several years?
            >
            > My second question: In the 1990s, the Czech announcers on TV and
            > radio tended to sound like eight-pack-a-day smokers, and their
            > proclamations were often accompanied by background music that would
            > have sounded somewhat odd in the West. Now I notice that radio
            > bumper music sounds just like in Germany, and the announcers' voices
            > have an almost drugged-up friendly sound to them, making the show IDs
            > and station IDs sound exactly like they do on Antenna Bayern. Has
            > anyone else noticed this change?
            >
            > Jamie
            >
          • kzgafas
            ... prostředi, ... Urcite to nebylo tak bezne, aby reporter mluvil na miste zpravodajstvi do kamery, ale nerekl bych, to bylo nemyslitelne. Urcite se to
            Message 5 of 5 , May 2, 2007
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              --- In Czechlist@yahoogroups.com, "spektrum2002" <padamek@...> wrote:
              >
              > To vsechno podle meho nazoru vyplyva z toho, ze do roku 1989 jsme byli
              > vuci svetu uzavreni a po roce 1989 jsme se otevreli na zapad a zacali
              > sami prejimat hodne z toho, co na Zapade vidime.
              > Muj postreh napriklad je, ze pred rokem 1989 bylo skoro nemyslitelne,
              > aby se televizni reporter postavil nekde na ulici a neco povidal a
              > kamera tu "talking head" zabirala. Kdyz byly zabery z exterieru,
              > vzdycky byl hlas jenom v pozadi a kamera zabirala jenom to
              prostředi,
              > nikdy ne reportera, natoz aby se sot zakoncoval identifikaci
              > "Ferdinand Vonasek, Ceska televize, Dolni Lhota".

              Urcite to nebylo tak bezne, aby reporter mluvil na miste zpravodajstvi
              do kamery, ale nerekl bych, to bylo nemyslitelne. Urcite se to taky
              delalo. Dnes se to dela nejspise proto, ze TV stanic je vic, tak se
              musi od sebe nejak odlisovat (personifikovat).

              Dalsi zajimavou veci napr. je, ze na statni televizi stale mluvi
              hlasatel(ka), ktery(a) uvadi jednotlive porady. Nijak mi to nevadi, ale
              je to jasny pozustatek z totality (ja hlasatel jedine statni televize
              vas budu provadet celym nasim programem, nase vysilani je postaveno na
              jedne jedine integralni platforme).

              K.
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