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HELP En-Ces financne vyhodny, Ces-En level crossing

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  • Helena Subrtova
    Dobry den, mam dotaz ohledne vyrazu *financne vyhodny* . (V textu je: vystavba je provadena za financne vyhodnych podminek) Ekonomicky slovnik uvadi budget ,
    Message 1 of 7 , Mar 31, 2007
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      Dobry den,
      mam dotaz ohledne vyrazu "*financne vyhodny*".
      (V textu je: vystavba je provadena za financne vyhodnych podminek)
      Ekonomicky slovnik uvadi "budget", a to se mi nejak nehodi.

      Druhy dotaz je na spis na rodile mluvci aj.
      V textu je: *prejezd zabezpeceny svetelnym zarizenim*
      da se to prelozit jako "light level crossing"?

      A take by mne zajimalo, zda jsou v UK nebo USA *detska dopravni hriste*
      (slo by napsat napriklad "children's traffic training ground"?

      Predem dekuji,

      Helena
    • James Kirchner
      ... There are a number of ways to render this expression, depending on context. I would suggest: Construction was carried out under financially advantageous
      Message 2 of 7 , Mar 31, 2007
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        On Mar 31, 2007, at 9:04 AM, Helena Subrtova wrote:

        > Dobry den,
        > mam dotaz ohledne vyrazu "*financne vyhodny*".
        > (V textu je: vystavba je provadena za financne vyhodnych podminek)
        > Ekonomicky slovnik uvadi "budget", a to se mi nejak nehodi.

        There are a number of ways to render this expression, depending on
        context.

        I would suggest:
        "Construction was carried out under financially advantageous
        conditions."

        > Druhy dotaz je na spis na rodile mluvci aj.
        > V textu je: *prejezd zabezpeceny svetelnym zarizenim*
        > da se to prelozit jako "light level crossing"?

        My suggestions:
        "overpass with security lighting"
        "overpass with safety lighting"

        This isn't my only idea, though. Are we talking about a pedestrian
        or automotive overpass? If it's for cars, the word "zabezpeceny"
        seems odd to me, since overpasses for cars pretty much have to be
        lighted, and I think it would be hard to put it into graceful
        English. For cars -- or even for pedestrians -- I might just say "a
        lighted overpass".

        > A take by mne zajimalo, zda jsou v UK nebo USA *detska dopravni
        > hriste*
        > (slo by napsat napriklad "children's traffic training ground"?

        I've never seen one of these in the United States -- even here in the
        Motor City -- and searching the web yields only one reference to one
        in an English-speaking country (and that page contains photos of one
        from the 1930s).

        I would trust the people in Finland and Mauritius on this and call it
        a "children's traffic playground".

        Jamie
      • Helena Subrtova
        This crossing is of a road and railway. Pedestrians can also use it. Helena
        Message 3 of 7 , Mar 31, 2007
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          This crossing is of a road and railway.
          Pedestrians can also use it.

          Helena
          >
          >
          > "overpass with safety lighting"
          >
          > This isn't my only idea, though. Are we talking about a pedestrian
          > or automotive overpass? If it's for cars, the word "zabezpeceny"
          > seems odd to me, since overpasses for cars pretty much have to be
          > lighted, and I think it would be hard to put it into graceful
          > English. For cars -- or even for pedestrians -- I might just say "a
          > lighted overpass".
          >



          >
          >
        • James Kirchner
          Is it a crossing or an overpass? A crossing is on solid ground, and an overpass is like a bridge. If it s for both trains and pedestrians, I d say an
          Message 4 of 7 , Mar 31, 2007
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            Is it a crossing or an overpass? A crossing is on solid ground, and
            an overpass is like a bridge.

            If it's for both trains and pedestrians, I'd say "an overpass with
            safety lighting", which is kind of redundant, so again, I might just
            say "a lighted overpass".

            Jamie

            On Mar 31, 2007, at 9:47 AM, Helena Subrtova wrote:

            > This crossing is of a road and railway.
            > Pedestrians can also use it.
            >
            > Helena
            > >
            > >
            > > "overpass with safety lighting"
            > >
            > > This isn't my only idea, though. Are we talking about a pedestrian
            > > or automotive overpass? If it's for cars, the word "zabezpeceny"
            > > seems odd to me, since overpasses for cars pretty much have to be
            > > lighted, and I think it would be hard to put it into graceful
            > > English. For cars -- or even for pedestrians -- I might just say "a
            > > lighted overpass".
            > >
            >
            > >
            > >
            >
            >
            >



            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          • Helena Subrtova
            It is on solid ground. You can find a picture of it at: http://am.euweb.cz/images/df/img_m/1301.jpg
            Message 5 of 7 , Mar 31, 2007
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              It is on solid ground.
              You can find a picture of it at:
              http://am.euweb.cz/images/df/img_m/1301.jpg
              James Kirchner napsal(a):
              >
              > Is it a crossing or an overpass? A crossing is on solid ground, and
              > an overpass is like a bridge.
              >
              > If it's for both trains and pedestrians, I'd say "an overpass with
              > safety lighting", which is kind of redundant, so again, I might just
              > say "a lighted overpass".
              >
              > Jamie
              >
              > On Mar 31, 2007, at 9:47 AM, Helena Subrtova wrote:
              >
              > > This crossing is of a road and railway.
              > > Pedestrians can also use it.
              > >
              > > Helena
              > > >
              > > >
              > > > "overpass with safety lighting"
              > > >
              > > > This isn't my only idea, though. Are we talking about a pedestrian
              > > > or automotive overpass? If it's for cars, the word "zabezpeceny"
              > > > seems odd to me, since overpasses for cars pretty much have to be
              > > > lighted, and I think it would be hard to put it into graceful
              > > > English. For cars -- or even for pedestrians -- I might just say "a
              > > > lighted overpass".
              > > >
              > >
              > > >
              > > >
              > >
              > >
              > >
              >
              > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
              >
              >
            • James Kirchner
              It s a railroad crossing with a flashing barricade. Jamie ... [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
              Message 6 of 7 , Mar 31, 2007
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                It's a railroad crossing with a flashing barricade.

                Jamie

                On Mar 31, 2007, at 10:09 AM, Helena Subrtova wrote:

                > It is on solid ground.
                > You can find a picture of it at:
                > http://am.euweb.cz/images/df/img_m/1301.jpg
                > James Kirchner napsal(a):
                > >
                > > Is it a crossing or an overpass? A crossing is on solid ground, and
                > > an overpass is like a bridge.
                > >
                > > If it's for both trains and pedestrians, I'd say "an overpass with
                > > safety lighting", which is kind of redundant, so again, I might just
                > > say "a lighted overpass".
                > >
                > > Jamie
                > >
                > > On Mar 31, 2007, at 9:47 AM, Helena Subrtova wrote:
                > >
                > > > This crossing is of a road and railway.
                > > > Pedestrians can also use it.
                > > >
                > > > Helena
                > > > >
                > > > >
                > > > > "overpass with safety lighting"
                > > > >
                > > > > This isn't my only idea, though. Are we talking about a
                > pedestrian
                > > > > or automotive overpass? If it's for cars, the word "zabezpeceny"
                > > > > seems odd to me, since overpasses for cars pretty much have
                > to be
                > > > > lighted, and I think it would be hard to put it into graceful
                > > > > English. For cars -- or even for pedestrians -- I might just
                > say "a
                > > > > lighted overpass".
                > > > >
                > > >
                > > > >
                > > > >
                > > >
                > > >
                > > >
                > >
                > > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                > >
                > >
                >
                >
                >



                [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
              • Michael Trittipo
                ... -- with which I don t disagree, but only add other possible terms, such as [railroad] grade crossing with warning lights and barricade or at-grade
                Message 7 of 7 , Mar 31, 2007
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                  James Kirchner wrote on 03/31/2007 09:17 AM:
                  > It's a railroad crossing with a flashing barricade.
                  >
                  in response to Helena Subrtova's mention that:


                  >> It is on solid ground.
                  >> You can find a picture of it at:
                  >> http://am.euweb.cz/images/df/img_m/1301.jpg
                  -- with which I don't disagree, but only add other possible terms, such
                  as "[railroad] grade crossing with warning lights and barricade" or
                  "at-grade crossing with signal lights and gate arm" and so on. For U.S.
                  terminology, check out the Federal Railroad Administration site such as
                  http://www.fra.dot.gov/us/content/86. (Actually, as bureaucrats, they
                  sometimes speak of "supplemental safety measures," but their definitions
                  and press releases still speak English, and talk about lights and gates.)
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