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help ENG-CES "tranches"

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  • Helena Subrtova
    Dobry den, mam dotaz ohledne dokumentu z evropske anglictiny (original FR). As regards the budget, tranches had been entered in the finance law. (je z
    Message 1 of 5 , Mar 25, 2007
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      Dobry den,
      mam dotaz ohledne dokumentu z evropske anglictiny (original FR).

      As regards the budget, tranches had been entered in the finance law.
      (je z dokumentu o evropske skole)

      Ceho se tyka vyraz "tranches"?

      Predem dekuji.
      Helena
    • Jan Kordac
      transe (hácek na s), samostatne uvolnená cast emise cennych papiru, nebo cast investice, viz:
      Message 2 of 5 , Mar 25, 2007
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        transe (hácek na s), samostatne uvolnená cast emise cennych papiru, nebo
        cast investice, viz:
        http://business.center.cz/business/pojmy/pojem.aspx?PojemID=1394

        JK
        > Dobry den,
        > mam dotaz ohledne dokumentu z evropske anglictiny (original FR).
        >
        > As regards the budget, tranches had been entered in the finance law.
        > (je z dokumentu o evropske skole)
        >
        > Ceho se tyka vyraz "tranches"?
        >
        > Predem dekuji.
        > Helena
        >
        >
        > Anglicke krouzky:
        > http://zehrovak.googlepages.com/circles
        >
        > Lokativ - terminologicky slovnik:
        > http://www.lokativ.com
        >
        >
        >
        > Yahoo! Groups Links
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
      • James Kirchner
        Tranche is a French word that literally means slice . So what they re talking about is sections or blocks of the budget. A few days ago on the radio here, a
        Message 3 of 5 , Mar 25, 2007
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          Tranche is a French word that literally means "slice". So what
          they're talking about is sections or blocks of the budget.

          A few days ago on the radio here, a general was being asked if the
          army was going to have trouble because of the congress playing games
          with the military budget for Iraq. The general said, "We don't need
          all the money now, but the first tranche of it is needed
          immediately." In other words, the first slice or block of the money.

          Jamie

          On Mar 25, 2007, at 4:22 AM, Helena Subrtova wrote:

          > Dobry den,
          > mam dotaz ohledne dokumentu z evropske anglictiny (original FR).
          >
          > As regards the budget, tranches had been entered in the finance law.
          > (je z dokumentu o evropske skole)
          >
          > Ceho se tyka vyraz "tranches"?
          >
          > Predem dekuji.
          > Helena
          >
          >
          > Anglicke krouzky:
          > http://zehrovak.googlepages.com/circles
          >
          > Lokativ - terminologicky slovnik:
          > http://www.lokativ.com
          >
          >
          >
          > Yahoo! Groups Links
          >
          >
          >
        • Bedrich Hadziu
          Jamie wrote: Tranche is a French word that literally means slice . So what they re talking about is sections or blocks of the budget. BELATED RESPONSE:
          Message 4 of 5 , Apr 1, 2007
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            Jamie wrote: "Tranche is a French word that literally means "slice". So what
            they're talking about is sections or blocks of the budget."

            BELATED RESPONSE:

            Jamie is partly right but I am afraid that a more specific meaning applies here, the one that Jan Kordac suggested. Here is a definition from Merriam Webster:

            Main Entry:tranche
            Pronunciation:*tr**sh
            Function:noun
            Inflected Form:-s
            Etymology:French, from Old French, from trenchier, trancher to cut * more at TRENCH

            : SLICE, SECTION, PORTION; specifically: a portion or series of a bond issue to be distributed in a foreign country

            Bedrich



            James Kirchner <jpklists@...> wrote:
            Tranche is a French word that literally means "slice". So what
            they're talking about is sections or blocks of the budget.

            A few days ago on the radio here, a general was being asked if the
            army was going to have trouble because of the congress playing games
            with the military budget for Iraq. The general said, "We don't need
            all the money now, but the first tranche of it is needed
            immediately." In other words, the first slice or block of the money.

            Jamie

            On Mar 25, 2007, at 4:22 AM, Helena Subrtova wrote:

            > Dobry den,
            > mam dotaz ohledne dokumentu z evropske anglictiny (original FR).
            >
            > As regards the budget, tranches had been entered in the finance law.
            > (je z dokumentu o evropske skole)
            >
            > Ceho se tyka vyraz "tranches"?
            >
            > Predem dekuji.
            > Helena
            >
            >
            > Anglicke krouzky:
            > http://zehrovak.googlepages.com/circles
            >
            > Lokativ - terminologicky slovnik:
            > http://www.lokativ.com
            >
            >
            >
            > Yahoo! Groups Links
            >
            >
            >






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          • James Kirchner
            ... No doubt. However, I don t think you could get away with saying tranche without some mention of a bond issue somewhere nearby. The word is used very
            Message 5 of 5 , Apr 1, 2007
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              On Apr 1, 2007, at 8:30 AM, Bedrich Hadziu wrote:

              > : SLICE, SECTION, PORTION; specifically: a portion or series of a
              > bond issue to be distributed in a foreign country

              No doubt. However, I don't think you could get away with saying
              "tranche" without some mention of a bond issue somewhere nearby. The
              word is used very seldom in English, and in the few times I've heard
              it, it's never been in reference to a bond issue, just to a block of
              money.

              Jamie



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