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Re: [Czechlist] Re. Yachting terminology - help needed

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  • Valerie Talacko
    My father says this is a stopper (which has a lever that goes up and down) if it s in connection with a halyard. ... From: Terminus Technicus
    Message 1 of 7 , Jan 3, 2007
      My father says this is a stopper (which has a lever that goes up and down)
      if it's in connection with a halyard.

      ----- Original Message -----
      From: "Terminus Technicus" <czechlist@...>
      To: <Czechlist@yahoogroups.com>
      Sent: Wednesday, January 03, 2007 7:51 AM
      Subject: Re: [Czechlist] Re. Yachting terminology - help needed


      >
      >>>
      >> I see, stoper - that'll be, surprisingly, a stopper:
      >
      > a cleat is actually a better term, I couldn't remember it before.. see:
      >
      > http://images.google.com/images?svnum=10&hl=cs&lr=&rls=GGLD%2CGGLD%3A2006-27%2CGGLD%3Aen&q=harken+cleats&btnG=Hledat
      >
      > I think your particular one is a cam cleat
      >
      > M
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      > Yahoo! Groups Links
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    • Terminus Technicus
      This was a dinghy (small sailboat) I m sure, because you don t use stoppers or cam cleats on jibsheet on bigger boats AND you don t move the cleat point (i.e.
      Message 2 of 7 , Jan 3, 2007
        This was a dinghy (small sailboat) I'm sure, because you don't use stoppers
        or cam cleats on jibsheet on bigger boats AND you don't move the cleat point
        (i.e. the stoppers/cleats), but the blocks.. on small boats, there's often
        no blocks, the sheet goes right into a cam cleat and it can be moved.. and
        certain people call cam cleat stoppers, search for "Harken stoppers" and
        you'll see a lot of them, then look into Images and you'll see some cam
        cleats being called stoppers.

        On a big boat, a halyard would be let from the mast through several blocks
        into the cockpit or onto the cabin roof and go through a stopper with a
        lever there, but on small boats, the halyard is either cleated directly on
        the mast - with a traditional two point cleat, or snapped into a cam cleat
        somewhere there.

        From the sounds of it, I think Dusan was talking about a dinghy

        BTW, there's a big difference between a swiwel mast and a (mast with)
        mast-furling sail, in both Czech and English, Dusan's hypothetical boat
        having the former also indicates it is a sports (and probably smaller) boat.
        Swiwel mast sits on top of a ball hinge and can rotate together with the
        sail to provide a better sail profile (the mast itself is usually
        shaped/streamlined more than a traditional one in this case) and it would
        never contain an in-mast furl, because that's counterproductive (no battens,
        bad sail shape). Mast-furling main is a hollow mast into which the main
        furls, IMHO it's not-normally specified where the sail goes if it goes into
        the mast (this is the traditional system), but it would be specified for
        booom-furling sails/rigs.

        What's the name of the boat/manufacturer, Dusan?

        Matej



        ----- Original Message -----
        From: "Valerie Talacko" <valerie@...>
        To: <Czechlist@yahoogroups.com>
        Sent: Wednesday, January 03, 2007 10:57 AM
        Subject: Re: [Czechlist] Re. Yachting terminology - help needed


        > My father says this is a stopper (which has a lever that goes up and down)
        > if it's in connection with a halyard.
        >
        > ----- Original Message -----
        > From: "Terminus Technicus" <czechlist@...>
        > To: <Czechlist@yahoogroups.com>
        > Sent: Wednesday, January 03, 2007 7:51 AM
        > Subject: Re: [Czechlist] Re. Yachting terminology - help needed
        >
        >
        >>
        >>>>
        >>> I see, stoper - that'll be, surprisingly, a stopper:
        >>
        >> a cleat is actually a better term, I couldn't remember it before.. see:
        >>
        >> http://images.google.com/images?svnum=10&hl=cs&lr=&rls=GGLD%2CGGLD%3A2006-27%2CGGLD%3Aen&q=harken+cleats&btnG=Hledat
        >>
        >> I think your particular one is a cam cleat
        >>
        >> M
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        >> Yahoo! Groups Links
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        > Yahoo! Groups Links
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