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Re: [Czechlist] Re: Help: Ulet/more craic

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  • Valerie Talacko
    here are some more usages! (note the warning re. US police officers...) http://www.urbandictionary.com/define.php?term=craic ... From: Valerie Talacko To:
    Message 1 of 1 , Jul 7, 2006
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      here are some more usages! (note the warning re. US police officers...)

      http://www.urbandictionary.com/define.php?term=craic


      ----- Original Message -----
      From: Valerie Talacko
      To: Czechlist@yahoogroups.com
      Sent: Friday, July 07, 2006 11:47 PM
      Subject: Re: [Czechlist] Re: Help: Ulet


      p.s. not that I'm suggesting that whether or not I've heard of something is the vital thing - at 38 (I got my age wrong...) you can easily not have heard of whole swathes of youth slang. However, I think when you're translating slang and you have two expressions that might well be used by said group, you should stick with the better-known one.

      ----- Original Message -----
      From: Valerie Talacko
      To: Czechlist@yahoogroups.com
      Sent: Friday, July 07, 2006 11:03 PM
      Subject: Re: [Czechlist] Re: Help: Ulet

      I'm not sure about it being the most appropriate in the UK, either. From what I can see, it's used more to mean 'good fun, a good laugh.' does that correspond to 'ulet'?

      (Plus I hadn't actually heard it, and I'm only 39 and only left the UK in September! My husband says it's really widespread in Australia).

      ----- Original Message -----
      From: grabanrad
      To: Czechlist@yahoogroups.com
      Sent: Friday, July 07, 2006 10:29 PM
      Subject: [Czechlist] Re: Help: Ulet

      Sorry. You are right, it is spelt 'craic'. Over here we spell it
      'crack' and, as I said earlier, it is a slang word which can be used in
      number of situations. Probably not understood in the US, but handy and
      probably the most appropriate when translating for UK readership. For
      more info on the usage visit www.peevish.co.uk/slang/

      Rad
      --- In Czechlist@yahoogroups.com, Michal Boleslav Mìchura
      <MichalMechura@...> wrote:
      >
      > > We frequently use crack/cracker/good crack (e.g. Now, that was a
      crack!
      > > or Last night was a crack.) or cracking (e.g. cracking movie) in the
      UK.
      > > It's a slang word of Irish origin (craig) very popular with younger
      > > generation meaning fun, pleasurable situation, fantastic, first
      class,
      > > etc..
      >
      > Good afternoon from Dublin,
      >
      > Not that anybody needs to know, but this is actually spelled "craic"
      in Irish (Gaelic) where it means fun, especially the type you have when
      socializing. It's very common in Irish English, too. I never knew it was
      so popular outside Ireland, though - maybe the subtle suggestion of a
      bodily orifice is what makes the term so attractive to those naughty
      youngsters?
      >
      > Michal
      >
      > P. S. Mimochodem, dovolte abych se pøedstavil, já jsem tady
      zánovní - u¾ pøed lety jsem byl èlenem. Tì¹ím se na
      inteligentní konverzace o pøekladatelských oøí¹cích a
      doufám, ¾e tady bude "craic" neboli prdel.
      >

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