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  • Hana Viansová
    Hi all, could you please help me with these? 1. is it common in English to use the French grave accent ( a ) to indicate a price at which goods are sold? e.g.
    Message 1 of 9 , May 24 11:57 AM
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      Hi all,

      could you please help me with these?

      1. is it common in English to use the French grave accent ("a") to indicate a price at which goods are sold? e.g. these jeans are sold a 50 dollars a pair?

      2. what's the difference btwn a keyboard and a keypad? Someone told me you have the former with a computer but the latter on a cell phone. Is that correct?

      3. What do you call "slovni uloha" in English? The type of math problem where you give the assignment in words rather than figures or formulas, e.g. If you go shopping with a 50 in your pocket, buy ..... and ..... but then a friend pays you back ....., you have lunch for ....... and leave a ........ tip and give ........ to your favorite beggar, how much do you end up having left?

      Thanks a lot,

      Hanka

      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • Hana Jarolímová
      keypad je napr. mrnava klavesnice na ruznych pristrojich, obsahuje mene klaves nez keyboard - zpravidla cislice, sipky, Enter, Delete, nekdy klavesu Menu H
      Message 2 of 9 , May 24 11:59 AM
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        keypad je napr. mrnava klavesnice na ruznych pristrojich, obsahuje mene
        klaves nez keyboard - zpravidla cislice, sipky, Enter, Delete, nekdy
        klavesu Menu
        H
      • coilinoc
        ... indicate a price at which goods are sold? e.g. these jeans are sold a 50 dollars a pair? ... told me you have the former with a computer but the latter on
        Message 3 of 9 , May 24 12:01 PM
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          --- In Czechlist@yahoogroups.com, Hana Viansová <bebeebeee@...>
          wrote:
          >
          > Hi all,
          >
          > could you please help me with these?
          >
          > 1. is it common in English to use the French grave accent ("a") to
          indicate a price at which goods are sold? e.g. these jeans are sold
          a 50 dollars a pair?
          >
          > 2. what's the difference btwn a keyboard and a keypad? Someone
          told me you have the former with a computer but the latter on a cell
          phone. Is that correct?
          >
          > 3. What do you call "slovni uloha" in English? The type of math
          problem where you give the assignment in words rather than figures
          or formulas, e.g. If you go shopping with a 50 in your pocket,
          buy ..... and ..... but then a friend pays you back ....., you have
          lunch for ....... and leave a ........ tip and give ........ to your
          favorite beggar, how much do you end up having left?
          >
          > Thanks a lot,
          >
          > Hanka
          >
          > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          >
        • coilinoc
          ... wrote: Hi Hana, my comments, for what they are worth, arre given below ... indicate a price at which goods are sold? e.g. these jeans are sold a 50 dollars
          Message 4 of 9 , May 24 12:09 PM
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            --- In Czechlist@yahoogroups.com, Hana Viansová <bebeebeee@...>
            wrote:
            Hi Hana,
            my comments, for what they are worth, arre given below
            > Hi all,
            >
            > could you please help me with these?
            >
            > 1. is it common in English to use the French grave accent ("a") to
            indicate a price at which goods are sold? e.g. these jeans are sold
            a 50 dollars a pair?
            No, not in my experience
            I'd say at 5O dollars a pair, 50 dollars each/apiece, etc.

            >
            > 2. what's the difference btwn a keyboard and a keypad? Someone
            told me you have the former with a computer but the latter on a cell
            phone. Is that correct?
            I would agree. Keypads tend to come with compact, all-in-one devices
            like Blackberries, mobile phones, etc. Keyboards are usually
            separate, discrete things like what you normally use with a PC.

            > 3. What do you call "slovni uloha" in English? The type of math
            problem where you give the assignment in words rather than figures
            or formulas, e.g. If you go shopping with a 50 in your pocket,
            buy ..... and ..... but then a friend pays you back ....., you have
            lunch for ....... and leave a ........ tip and give ........ to your
            favorite beggar, how much do you end up having left?

            I did millions of these when I was in school (usually involving
            apples and oranges). I can't remember ever calling them anything
            other than "maths problems" (I would imagine an American might
            say "math problems") or "exercises." I don't ever remember there
            being a distinction between problems given in numbers and words, but
            then again it was a long (ever-increasing) time ago...

            HTH
            Coilin
            >
            > Thanks a lot,
            >
            > Hanka
            >
            > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
            >
          • James Kirchner
            ... We don t use à. We use @. For example: 5 units @ $50.00/unit ... The keyboard is the device you use to input language into your computer. A keypad is
            Message 5 of 9 , May 24 12:11 PM
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              On May 24, 2006, at 2:57 PM, Hana Viansová wrote:

              > 1. is it common in English to use the French grave accent ("a") to
              > indicate a price at which goods are sold? e.g. these jeans are sold
              > a 50 dollars a pair?

              We don't use à. We use @. For example:

              5 units @ $50.00/unit

              > 2. what's the difference btwn a keyboard and a keypad? Someone told
              > me you have the former with a computer but the latter on a cell
              > phone. Is that correct?

              The keyboard is the device you use to input language into your
              computer. A keypad is for numbers, so you have keypads on phones,
              calculators, etc. Many computer keyboards have a keypad to the far
              right just for the input of numbers.

              > 3. What do you call "slovni uloha" in English? The type of math
              > problem where you give the assignment in words rather than figures
              > or formulas, e.g. If you go shopping with a 50 in your pocket,
              > buy ..... and ..... but then a friend pays you back ....., you have
              > lunch for ....... and leave a ........ tip and give ........ to
              > your favorite beggar, how much do you end up having left?

              In the US those are usually called "story problems". I have heard
              some teachers recently calling them "word problems", but that sounds
              ugly.

              Jamie
            • melvyn.geo
              ... Same goes for Britain. I ve never seen the French a grave used with that meaning in Britain. ... Agreed. Of course, this was the original usage of the
              Message 6 of 9 , May 24 12:37 PM
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                >
                >
                > On May 24, 2006, at 2:57 PM, Hana Viansov� wrote:
                >
                > > 1. is it common in English to use the French grave accent ("a") to
                > > indicate a price at which goods are sold? e.g. these jeans are sold
                > > a 50 dollars a pair?

                --- In Czechlist@yahoogroups.com, James Kirchner <jpklists@...> wrote:
                > We don't use �.

                Same goes for Britain. I've never seen the French a grave used with
                that meaning in Britain.

                >We use @.

                >
                > 5 units @ $50.00/unit

                Agreed. Of course, this was the original usage of the at-sign in days
                of old when computers had lots of little beads on rods. I read
                somewhere (excuse lack of source and academic rigour on this one) that
                the at-sign originated among Florentine merchants during the Middle
                Ages.

                >
                > > 3. What do you call "slovni uloha" in English?
                >
                > In the US those are usually called "story problems". I have heard
                > some teachers recently calling them "word problems", but that sounds
                > ugly.

                I seem to remember them being referred to as "verbal problems". Lots
                of search engine hits for this in a "math" context.

                BR

                M.
              • James Kirchner
                ... That s a good explanation. Note that the input devices on things like the Palm Treo phones are called keyboards, probably because they have letters. Jamie
                Message 7 of 9 , May 24 12:37 PM
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                  On May 24, 2006, at 2:59 PM, Hana Jarolímová wrote:

                  > keypad je napr. mrnava klavesnice na ruznych pristrojich, obsahuje
                  > mene
                  > klaves nez keyboard - zpravidla cislice, sipky, Enter, Delete, nekdy
                  > klavesu Menu

                  That's a good explanation. Note that the input devices on things
                  like the Palm Treo phones are called keyboards, probably because they
                  have letters.

                  Jamie
                • James Kirchner
                  ... I think I would understand a verbal problem to be some kind of aphasia or other speech production problem. Otherwise, I m with you. Jamie
                  Message 8 of 9 , May 24 12:44 PM
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                    On May 24, 2006, at 3:37 PM, melvyn.geo wrote:

                    > I seem to remember them being referred to as "verbal problems". Lots
                    > of search engine hits for this in a "math" context.

                    I think I would understand a verbal problem to be some kind of
                    aphasia or other speech production problem.

                    Otherwise, I'm with you.

                    Jamie
                  • Jirka Bolech
                    Hi Hanka, 2. what s the difference btwn a keyboard and a keypad? I d like to add that also the bunch of keys on the right-hand side of a standard computer
                    Message 9 of 9 , May 24 1:13 PM
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                      Hi Hanka,

                      2. what's the difference btwn a keyboard and a keypad?

                      I'd like to add that also the bunch of keys on the right-hand side of a
                      standard computer keyboard is also referred to as a 'numeric keypad'
                      (http://www.webopedia.com/TERM/n/numeric_keypad.html,
                      http://www.computerhope.com/jargon/n/numekeyp.htm)...

                      Jirka Bolech
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