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term: Docent

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  • Amir
    Hi .. is there any other way to say Docent in English apart from Associate Professor ? Is it ok to leave MUDr. as MUDr. ? I don t feel comfortable about
    Message 1 of 6 , May 3, 2006
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      Hi ..

      is there any other way to say "Docent" in English apart from
      "Associate Professor"? Is it ok to leave "MUDr." as "MUDr."? I don't
      feel comfortable about translating "MUDr." as "MD" because MD is an
      official title used in the US (and granted to international medical
      graduates by the ECFMG _IF_ they pass the USMLE), and not a mere
      translation. However, I expect the client to be disappointed if he
      doesn't see himself to be an "Assoc.Prof. Herbert Kokodak, MD" in
      english or "Priv-Doz. Dr.med. Herbert Kokodak" in German. As for
      Germany, I know it is actually a crime to use a title one doesn't
      have, i.e. claiming that you are Dr.med. Kokodak if you are actually
      MUDr. Kokodak would be "strafbar" (I think fine or up to 1 year in
      prison or so) - and I could use this argument if someone blamed me I
      didn't translate his title correctly. Is there any similar rule in
      English? Or is the use of MD ok because everybody uses it anyway?

      Thx Amir
    • melvyn.geo
      ... Old Poldauf suggests senior lecturer . Is it ok to leave MUDr. as MUDr. ? I think the last time we had this discussion, the ayes clearly had it. BR M.
      Message 2 of 6 , May 3, 2006
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        --- In Czechlist@yahoogroups.com, "Amir" <amir.z@...> wrote:

        > is there any other way to say "Docent" in English apart from
        > "Associate Professor"?

        Old Poldauf suggests "senior lecturer".

        Is it ok to leave "MUDr." as "MUDr."?

        I think the last time we had this discussion, the ayes clearly had it.

        BR

        M.
      • James Kirchner
        ... Except that almost no one will know what it means. Jamie
        Message 3 of 6 , May 3, 2006
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          On May 3, 2006, at 6:56 PM, melvyn.geo wrote:

          > Is it ok to leave "MUDr." as "MUDr."?
          >
          > I think the last time we had this discussion, the ayes clearly had it.

          Except that almost no one will know what it means.

          Jamie
        • Gerald Turner
          Dear Amir, In all events it depends on the context and the end user of the translation. As Jamie rightly points out MUDr is not used in the English-speaking
          Message 4 of 6 , May 3, 2006
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            Dear Amir,

            In all events it depends on the context and the end user of the
            translation. As Jamie rightly points out MUDr is not used in the
            English-speaking world. What is the importance of the title in your
            particular context? You can always use Dr without offending the person
            (although AFAIK in UK surgeons use Mr - as a privilege). In most cases
            Czech title use is idiosyncratic and should be simplified; i.e. get
            rid of Ing and Mgr too.

            Gerry
            (ducking)

            On 03/05/06, Amir <amir.z@...> wrote:
            > Hi ..
            >
            > is there any other way to say "Docent" in English apart from
            > "Associate Professor"? Is it ok to leave "MUDr." as "MUDr."? I don't
            > feel comfortable about translating "MUDr." as "MD" because MD is an
            > official title used in the US (and granted to international medical
            > graduates by the ECFMG _IF_ they pass the USMLE), and not a mere
            > translation. However, I expect the client to be disappointed if he
            > doesn't see himself to be an "Assoc.Prof. Herbert Kokodak, MD" in
            > english or "Priv-Doz. Dr.med. Herbert Kokodak" in German. As for
            > Germany, I know it is actually a crime to use a title one doesn't
            > have, i.e. claiming that you are Dr.med. Kokodak if you are actually
            > MUDr. Kokodak would be "strafbar" (I think fine or up to 1 year in
            > prison or so) - and I could use this argument if someone blamed me I
            > didn't translate his title correctly. Is there any similar rule in
            > English? Or is the use of MD ok because everybody uses it anyway?
            >
            > Thx Amir
            >
            >
            >
            >
            >
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          • James Kirchner
            ... A lot of people think Mgr. means manager , and I ve run into people who think Ing. is an abbreviation of the person s first name, as if a disproportionate
            Message 5 of 6 , May 4, 2006
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              On May 4, 2006, at 2:45 AM, Gerald Turner wrote:

              > get rid of Ing and Mgr too.

              A lot of people think Mgr. means "manager", and I've run into people
              who think Ing. is an abbreviation of the person's first name, as if a
              disproportionate number of Czechs is named Ignac or something.

              Jamie
            • kzgafas
              I prefer translating MUDr. as M.D. to convey (explain) into English who that person is, and what he does. Czech MUDrs in the US are entitled to practice
              Message 6 of 6 , May 4, 2006
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                I prefer translating MUDr. as M.D. to convey (explain) into English
                who that person is, and what he does. Czech MUDrs in the US are
                entitled to practice medicine there after they pass an exam so I
                regard them as MD in prinicple.

                Regarding docent - I usually omit that. Assoc. prof. maybe quite
                close to it, but I would stay away from translating it this way. If
                it follows from the context that the MD concerned does his own
                research (or practice) with his own laboratory (or department) and
                has his own staff , then it is clear that he is somewhere at the
                assoc. prof. level, and that title becomes redundant, I would say.

                But in many cases, I leave Czech "Prof." in English.


                K.

                --- In Czechlist@yahoogroups.com, "Amir" <amir.z@...> wrote:
                >
                > Hi ..
                >
                > is there any other way to say "Docent" in English apart from
                > "Associate Professor"? Is it ok to leave "MUDr." as "MUDr."? I
                don't
                > feel comfortable about translating "MUDr." as "MD" because MD is
                an
                > official title used in the US (and granted to international
                medical
                > graduates by the ECFMG _IF_ they pass the USMLE), and not a mere
                > translation. However, I expect the client to be disappointed if he
                > doesn't see himself to be an "Assoc.Prof. Herbert Kokodak, MD" in
                > english or "Priv-Doz. Dr.med. Herbert Kokodak" in German. As for
                > Germany, I know it is actually a crime to use a title one doesn't
                > have, i.e. claiming that you are Dr.med. Kokodak if you are
                actually
                > MUDr. Kokodak would be "strafbar" (I think fine or up to 1 year in
                > prison or so) - and I could use this argument if someone blamed me
                I
                > didn't translate his title correctly. Is there any similar rule in
                > English? Or is the use of MD ok because everybody uses it anyway?
                >
                > Thx Amir
                >
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