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Re: [Czechlist] Re: TERMS: poptavka vs. nabidka

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  • Iveta Pecinkova - preklady a tlumoceni
    My client (cold forging company) usually uses RFQ (quote) when the whole project, design and price are involved. They tend to use RFP (proposal) when, for
    Message 1 of 12 , Feb 28, 2006
      My client (cold forging company) usually uses RFQ (quote) when the whole
      project, design and price are involved.
      They tend to use RFP (proposal) when, for example, only a material change is
      involved - not for money reasons but, for instance, chemical composition to
      achieve a better material flow or whatever. But for new product deliveries
      they prefer "request for quote". But this may apply only to this company and
      I wonder whether native speakers see any difference between RFQ and RFP in
      this context.


      Iveta

      ----- Original Message -----
      From: "Michael" <tritt002@...>
      To: <Czechlist@yahoogroups.com>
      Sent: Wednesday, March 01, 2006 5:53 AM
      Subject: [Czechlist] Re: TERMS: poptavka vs. nabidka


      > --- In Czechlist@yahoogroups.com, "coilinoc" <coilinoc@...> wrote:
      >> A classic example of someone not minding their p's and q's
      >> perhaps? :-)
      >> > Seconded, RFQ (not P), especially in telco sector...
      >> > ----- Original Message -----
      >> > > . . . quite often uses "RFP" = request for quote
      >
      > From your smiley, I'm sure you know that RFP is in fact quite common,
      > but for "request for proposal" instead of "request for quote."
      >
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      > Useful resource of the week:
      > http://tinyurl.com
      >
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      > Yahoo! Groups Links
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    • Jan Culka
      AFAIK, Proposal, Quotation and even Offer are quite equivalent and thus also used. Bidder is quite kosher, Offerer cannot be seen anywhere, although maybe
      Message 2 of 12 , Mar 1, 2006
        AFAIK, Proposal, Quotation and even Offer are quite equivalent and thus also
        used.
        Bidder is quite kosher, Offerer cannot be seen anywhere, although maybe
        correct.
        Honza


        ----- Original Message -----
        From: "kzgafas" <kzgafas@...>
        To: <Czechlist@yahoogroups.com>
        Sent: Wednesday, March 01, 2006 6:16 AM
        Subject: [Czechlist] CONT.: poptavka vs. nabidka - nabizejici


        > Thank you for this. Request and Quote sound really great for my use.
        > And what about - nabizejici - the party (potential supplier)
        > preparing the Quote? I have tried to use Offerer - but I think there
        > should be something better. Or Bidder - this sounds slangish for my
        > use. Or maybe it is OK(?). Any suggestions for nabizejici?
        >
        > Thank you,
        >
        > K.
        >
        >
        >
        > --- In Czechlist@yahoogroups.com, "Pecinkova - prekladatelsky
        > servis" <preklady@...> wrote:
        > >
        > > An American company I work for quite often uses "RFP" = request
        > for quote
        > > (poptavka) vs. quote (nabidka). And they have heaps of official
        > forms to
        > > support it.
        > > Iveta
        > >
        > > ----- Original Message -----
        > > From: "kzgafas" <kzgafas@...>
        > > To: <Czechlist@yahoogroups.com>
        > > Sent: Tuesday, February 28, 2006 10:23 PM
        > > Subject: [Czechlist] TERMS: poptavka vs. nabidka
        > >
        > >
        > > > Context:
        > > > A large telecom company needs to choose among more suppliers of
        > > > speficic devices. So they issue poptavka (poptavkovy dokument) to
        > > > these suppliers to make their nabidka to the telecom company so
        > that
        > > > the company can choose the best offer (price vs. quality). How
        > would
        > > > you render poptavka and nabidka in this context? Quite frankly,
        > I have
        > > > never felt really comfortable in rendering this pair (nabidka vs.
        > > > poptavka) in English. May I use "bid" for nabidka? Isnt it too
        > > > slangish? I am looking for something that would fit into a
        > formal and
        > > > carefully prepared (official) poptavkovy dokument.
        > > >
        > > >
        > > > Thank you,
        > > >
        > > > K.
        > > >
        > > >
        > > >
        > > >
        > > >
        > > > Useful resource of the week:
        > > > http://tinyurl.com
        > > >
        > > >
        > > > Yahoo! Groups Links
        > > >
        > > >
        > > >
        > > >
        > > >
        > > >
        > >
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        > Useful resource of the week:
        > http://tinyurl.com
        >
        >
        > Yahoo! Groups Links
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      • Michael
        ... I don t see much. In the U.S., I d tend to limit the quote form, which is almost never heard, as being for something pretty cut-and- dried, standard,
        Message 3 of 12 , Mar 1, 2006
          --- In Czechlist@yahoogroups.com, "Iveta Pecinkova - preklady a
          tlumoceni" <preklady@...> wrote:
          > I wonder whether native speakers see any difference
          > between RFQ and RFP in this context.

          I don't see much. In the U.S., I'd tend to limit the "quote" form,
          which is almost never heard, as being for something pretty cut-and-
          dried, standard, off-the-shelf, and "proposal" (which is what I've
          almost always heard in a variety of contexts) as being for something
          that might involve alternatives, design or project choices, etc. But
          for any practical purpose, they'd be synonyms.

          It may be a regional variation. Google shows the following
          difference between the U.S. and the U.K.: when sites are made
          predominantly U.S. by using the site restriction site:.edu, site:.gov
          or site:.us, the proportion very very greatly favors RFP over RFQ
          (i.e., "request for proposal" over "request for quote" both spelled
          out in full and limited to precise string by quotation marks): by
          149,000 to 700 in .edu, 227,000 to 900 in .gov, and 273,000 to 900
          for .us -- but using a site restrictor of site:.uk produces a
          disproportion markedly (though less extremely lopsided) the other
          way: 160k for the RFQ and 24k for RFP (both spelled out in full, of
          course). So the US has about a 180:1 favor for RFP; the UK about a
          8:1 favor for RFQ.
        • Pecinkova - prekladatelsky servis
          Thanks, Michael ... From: Michael To: Sent: Wednesday, March 01, 2006 6:06 PM Subject: [Czechlist] Re:
          Message 4 of 12 , Mar 1, 2006
            Thanks, Michael

            ----- Original Message -----
            From: "Michael" <tritt002@...>
            To: <Czechlist@yahoogroups.com>
            Sent: Wednesday, March 01, 2006 6:06 PM
            Subject: [Czechlist] Re: TERMS: poptavka vs. nabidka


            > --- In Czechlist@yahoogroups.com, "Iveta Pecinkova - preklady a
            > tlumoceni" <preklady@...> wrote:
            >> I wonder whether native speakers see any difference
            >> between RFQ and RFP in this context.
            >
            > I don't see much. In the U.S., I'd tend to limit the "quote" form,
            > which is almost never heard, as being for something pretty cut-and-
            > dried, standard, off-the-shelf, and "proposal" (which is what I've
            > almost always heard in a variety of contexts) as being for something
            > that might involve alternatives, design or project choices, etc. But
            > for any practical purpose, they'd be synonyms.
            >
            > It may be a regional variation. Google shows the following
            > difference between the U.S. and the U.K.: when sites are made
            > predominantly U.S. by using the site restriction site:.edu, site:.gov
            > or site:.us, the proportion very very greatly favors RFP over RFQ
            > (i.e., "request for proposal" over "request for quote" both spelled
            > out in full and limited to precise string by quotation marks): by
            > 149,000 to 700 in .edu, 227,000 to 900 in .gov, and 273,000 to 900
            > for .us -- but using a site restrictor of site:.uk produces a
            > disproportion markedly (though less extremely lopsided) the other
            > way: 160k for the RFQ and 24k for RFP (both spelled out in full, of
            > course). So the US has about a 180:1 favor for RFP; the UK about a
            > 8:1 favor for RFQ.
            >
            >
            >
            >
            >
            >
            >
            >
            >
            > Useful resource of the week:
            > http://tinyurl.com
            >
            >
            > Yahoo! Groups Links
            >
            >
            >
            >
            >
            >
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