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Re: [Czechlist] Re: Term:Doc. MUDr. CSc.

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  • Michael Gmail
    I have to disagree here. Degrees and titles in different countries are based on different qualifications, and translating them could lead the reader to
    Message 1 of 8 , Oct 3, 2005
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      I have to disagree here. Degrees and titles in different countries
      are based on different qualifications, and "translating" them could
      lead the reader to believe that an individual has specific training/
      examinations/experience that he may not actually have, or in some
      cases a generally higher or lower level of qualification than is
      actually true. Except in very informal contexts, I would always leave
      academic and professional qualifications in the original.

      Michael

      On Oct 1, 2005, at 5:52 PM, James Kirchner wrote:

      > You sometimes do find people in the US with names officially rendered
      > as "Joe Shmoe, M.D., Ph.D." I also happen to have known in my life a
      > "Joe Shmoe, M.D., J.D.", which would mean he's "MUDr. JUDr." There is
      > nothing wrong with translating MUDr. as MD and JUDr. as JD, and other
      > things, as far as I know.
      >

      --

      Ausfuhrbestimmungen sind Erklärungen zu den Erklärungen, mit denen
      man eine Erklärung erklärt.
      (Protokoll im Wirtschaftsministerium)
    • coilinoc
      ... leave ... I m totally with Michael on this one. Degrees and qualifications are specific to each country. For example, an Irish leaving certificate
      Message 2 of 8 , Oct 3, 2005
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        --- In Czechlist@yahoogroups.com, Michael Gmail <mgrant@g...> wrote:
        > I have to disagree here. Degrees and titles in different countries
        > are based on different qualifications, and "translating" them could
        > lead the reader to believe that an individual has specific training/
        > examinations/experience that he may not actually have, or in some
        > cases a generally higher or lower level of qualification than is
        > actually true. Except in very informal contexts, I would always
        leave
        > academic and professional qualifications in the original.
        >
        > Michael
        >

        I'm totally with Michael on this one. Degrees and qualifications are
        specific to each country. For example, an Irish leaving certificate
        biology qualification is very different to an A-level biology
        qualification and these are two countries that speak the same
        language...
        Moreover, as far as I know being an MUDr. does not entitle you to
        practice medicine as a doctor in the US. Therefore translating it as
        MD would in effect be a mistranslation, especially if the document was
        intended for a monolingual US reader.
        I always leave the original abbreviations and, where appropriate, I
        asterisk the qualification and subsequently insert a footnote like *
        ing. - qualification equivalent to Master of Science/Master of
        economcis in the Czech Republic. (depending in the institution that
        is awarding it). This has the advantage of letting the reader know
        what the person in question is qualified to do in their own country
        without giving them the impression that they have a US/UK/Irish-
        standard qualification (which could be better or worse...). Of course,
        the drawback is it can sometimes be quite cumbersome doing this...
        Coilin
      • James Kirchner
        ... I have MUDr s and their equivalents from other countries show up in my classes, and they are qualified to practice medicine here if they pass their state
        Message 3 of 8 , Oct 3, 2005
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          On Monday, October 3, 2005, at 06:41 PM, coilinoc wrote:

          > Moreover, as far as I know being an MUDr. does not entitle you to
          > practice medicine as a doctor in the US.  Therefore translating it as
          > MD would in effect be a mistranslation, especially if the document was
          > intended for a monolingual US reader.

          I have MUDr's and their equivalents from other countries show up in my
          classes, and they are qualified to practice medicine here if they pass
          their state medical board exams. I'm not an expert on it, but I don't
          think it's so much that the degree is different, but that the exams
          are. The ones in my classes appear to go through some ESL training,
          take their boards, and then practice medicine. So, for practical
          purposes, a MUDr. seems to be equivalent to an MD. The story I usually
          get is that a MUDr. is trained more low-tech (depending on the country)
          than the American MD is, and this is where the problems passing the
          board exams arises.

          Jamie


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