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Re: Cz>Eng: soliter (art and design)

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  • David Daduc
    ... If you say an artist is a soliter , I think it usually means he or she does not join art movements, circles, or groups, but prefers searching their own
    Message 1 of 8 , Sep 3, 2005
      > This seems to be a vogue expression, although I've not encountered it
      > before. Can someone supply me with an equivalent?

      If you say an artist is a "soliter", I think it usually means he or she
      does not join art movements, circles, or groups, but prefers searching
      their own expression and motifs. Among the great writers, I'd say
      Gerard Manley Hopkins, Franz Kafka, or Emily Dickinson, for example,
      were extreme "soliteri".

      I've just consulted a dictionary and it says that in golsmithery,
      a "soliter" is a precious stone, especially a large diamond, embedded
      separately in a piece of jewellery.

      David
    • James Kirchner
      ... Can you give some context? I think soliter is undoubtedly just solitaire in English. In art and design, from a Czech perspective, it probably means a
      Message 2 of 8 , Sep 3, 2005
        On Saturday, September 3, 2005, at 03:13 PM, Gerald Turner wrote:

        > This seems to be a vogue expression, although I've not encountered it
        > before. Can someone supply me with an equivalent?

        Can you give some context?

        I think soliter is undoubtedly just "solitaire" in English. In art and
        design, from a Czech perspective, it probably means a single gem placed
        in a simple setting, just as it does in English. That is, unless your
        context says something else.

        Jamie



        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      • James Kirchner
        ... I think that s sometimes referred to in English as an artistic loner . Jamie [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        Message 3 of 8 , Sep 3, 2005
          On Saturday, September 3, 2005, at 03:59 PM, David Daduc wrote:

          > > This seems to be a vogue expression, although I've not encountered it
          > > before. Can someone supply me with an equivalent?
          >
          > If you say an artist is a "soliter", I think it usually means he or she
          > does not join art movements, circles, or groups, but prefers searching
          > their own expression and motifs. Among the great writers, I'd say
          > Gerard Manley Hopkins, Franz Kafka, or Emily Dickinson, for example,
          > were extreme "soliteri".

          I think that's sometimes referred to in English as "an artistic loner".

          Jamie



          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        • melvyn.geo
          ... Hanka agrees that this is one of the meanings. Free agent , free spirit or freewheeler come to my befuddled mind as very loose terms, but I think I ll
          Message 4 of 8 , Sep 3, 2005
            --- In Czechlist@yahoogroups.com, "David Daduc" <wordfast@v...> wrote:

            > If you say an artist is a "soliter", I think it usually means he or
            >she does not join art movements, circles, or groups, but prefers
            >searching their own expression and motifs. Among the great writers,
            >I'd say Gerard Manley Hopkins, Franz Kafka, or Emily Dickinson, for
            >example, were extreme "soliteri".

            Hanka agrees that this is one of the meanings. 'Free agent', 'free
            spirit' or 'freewheeler' come to my befuddled mind as very loose
            terms, but I think I'll go consult my pillow about this one...

            > I've just consulted a dictionary and it says that in golsmithery,
            > a "soliter" is a precious stone, especially a large diamond, embedded
            > separately in a piece of jewellery.

            'Solitaire' is used for such jewellery pieces, according to my
            dictionaries.

            Hanka tells me that 'soliter' can be a work of art (e.g. a sculpture)
            that stands alone, not as part of a set or a collection. Possibly
            "solitaire" too (?):

            (The Thinker [] has been made public as a solitaire sculpture
            www.boloji.com/workshop/015/15ws11.htm

            M.
            Hmmm...solo act? One-off? Oddball?? :-) Naah!
          • James Kirchner
            ... Very loose. I don t think these would be used in art circles. I still think artistic loner is the best for a Dickinson or Kafka type, while an artist
            Message 5 of 8 , Sep 3, 2005
              On Saturday, September 3, 2005, at 06:46 PM, melvyn.geo wrote:

              > --- In Czechlist@yahoogroups.com, "David Daduc" <wordfast@v...> wrote:
              >
              > 'Free agent', 'free
              > spirit' or 'freewheeler' come to my befuddled mind as very loose
              > terms, but I think I'll go consult my pillow about this one...

              Very loose. I don't think these would be used in art circles. I still
              think "artistic loner" is the best for a Dickinson or Kafka type, while
              an artist who doesn't isolate himself but can't be pegged in terms of
              style, movement or clique would be called an "eccentric". Ladies off
              somewhere in the Appalachian Mountains who sculpt dramatic scenes from
              old chewing gum painted with cheap watercolors, or men in downtown
              Huntsville who build decorative towers from cement and discarded Coke
              bottles, or the lady in downtown Detroit who used rubbish to decorate
              half a block until it became what locals called "The Church of
              Junkintology" are called "outsider artists".

              From my art school days I just don't remember a term that would be as
              all-encompassing as "solitér".

              > Hanka tells me that 'soliter' can be a work of art (e.g. a sculpture)
              > that stands alone, not as part of a set or a collection. Possibly
              > "solitaire" too (?):

              In the anglophone art world, this is called a "stand-alone artwork"
              (variously punctuated), not to be confused with a freestanding artwork.'

              Jamie




              [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
            • kukkkacka
              I agree with you all.. generally solitaire is anything (person or thing) which doesn´t need any company. It (or he or she) can and desires to exist without
              Message 6 of 8 , Sep 4, 2005
                I agree with you all.. generally "solitaire" is anything (person or
                thing) which doesn´t need any company. It (or he or she) can and
                desires to exist without any other influence...

                -- In Czechlist@yahoogroups.com, James Kirchner <jpklists@s...> wrote:
                >
                > On Saturday, September 3, 2005, at 06:46 PM, melvyn.geo wrote:
                >
                > > --- In Czechlist@yahoogroups.com, "David Daduc" <wordfast@v...>
                wrote:
                > >
                > > 'Free agent', 'free
                > > spirit' or 'freewheeler' come to my befuddled mind as very loose
                > > terms, but I think I'll go consult my pillow about this one...
                >
                > Very loose. I don't think these would be used in art circles. I
                still
                > think "artistic loner" is the best for a Dickinson or Kafka type,
                while
                > an artist who doesn't isolate himself but can't be pegged in terms
                of
                > style, movement or clique would be called an "eccentric". Ladies
                off
                > somewhere in the Appalachian Mountains who sculpt dramatic scenes
                from
                > old chewing gum painted with cheap watercolors, or men in downtown
                > Huntsville who build decorative towers from cement and discarded
                Coke
                > bottles, or the lady in downtown Detroit who used rubbish to
                decorate
                > half a block until it became what locals called "The Church of
                > Junkintology" are called "outsider artists".
                >
                > From my art school days I just don't remember a term that would be
                as
                > all-encompassing as "solitér".
                >
                > > Hanka tells me that 'soliter' can be a work of art (e.g. a
                sculpture)
                > > that stands alone, not as part of a set or a collection. Possibly
                > > "solitaire" too (?):
                >
                > In the anglophone art world, this is called a "stand-alone artwork"
                > (variously punctuated), not to be confused with a freestanding
                artwork.'
                >
                > Jamie
                >
                >
                >
                >
                > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
              • Gerald Turner
                Well done, Melvyn, Hanka and Jamie!! In spite of the inexcusable lack of context, you ve jointly hit the nail truly on the head. Stand-alone artwork it will
                Message 7 of 8 , Sep 4, 2005
                  Well done, Melvyn, Hanka and Jamie!! In spite of the inexcusable lack
                  of context, you've jointly hit the nail truly on the head.
                  "Stand-alone artwork" it will be, or "solitaire sculpture" for variety.

                  Many thanks to you and the other members who contributed.

                  Gerry


                  --- In Czechlist@yahoogroups.com, James Kirchner <jpklists@s...> wrote:
                  >
                  > On Saturday, September 3, 2005, at 06:46 PM, melvyn.geo wrote:
                  >
                  >
                  > > Hanka tells me that 'soliter' can be a work of art (e.g. a sculpture)
                  > > that stands alone, not as part of a set or a collection. Possibly
                  > > "solitaire" too (?):
                  >
                  > In the anglophone art world, this is called a "stand-alone artwork"
                  > (variously punctuated), not to be confused with a freestanding artwork.'
                  >
                  > Jamie
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
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