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term: Match test

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  • Amir
    Im translating a pharma e-detailing presentation.. the characteristics of the medicament are listed and the doctor is asked which ot them would he like in this
    Message 1 of 9 , Aug 15, 2005
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      Im translating a pharma e-detailing presentation.. the characteristics
      of the medicament are listed and the doctor is asked which ot them
      would he like in this medicament .. at the end he is told that all
      these qualities match the medicament .. they call it match test. Is
      there a czech term for this?

      Thx A
    • kzgafas
      ... characteristics ... Test shody might be an option. Although I did not find any listing that would support it for this specific context. K.
      Message 2 of 9 , Aug 19, 2005
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        --- In Czechlist@yahoogroups.com, "Amir" <amir.z@s...> wrote:
        > Im translating a pharma e-detailing presentation.. the
        characteristics
        > of the medicament are listed and the doctor is asked which ot them
        > would he like in this medicament .. at the end he is told that all
        > these qualities match the medicament .. they call it match test. Is
        > there a czech term for this?
        >
        > Thx A

        "Test shody" might be an option. Although I did not find any listing
        that would support it for this specific context.

        K.
      • James Kirchner
        Can anybody think of examples of loan words that show evidence that they passed through a second language before entering Czech? Examples: S^pagety must have
        Message 3 of 9 , Aug 19, 2005
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          Can anybody think of examples of loan words that show evidence that
          they passed through a second language before entering Czech?

          Examples:

          "S^pagety" must have entered Czech by way of German, because if it
          hadn't, it would probably be "spagety".

          "Chuligán" must have entered Czech through Russian or maybe Polish,
          because if it had come in directly from English, it would be "huligán".

          Does anyone know any more?

          Jamie
        • Michael Gmail
          I imagine there must be quite a few that came from French by way of German, though I m drawing a blank right now in trying to think of any.... Michael ... --
          Message 4 of 9 , Aug 19, 2005
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            I imagine there must be quite a few that came from French by way of
            German, though I'm drawing a blank right now in trying to think of
            any....

            Michael



            On Aug 19, 2005, at 6:40 PM, James Kirchner wrote:

            > Can anybody think of examples of loan words that show evidence that
            > they passed through a second language before entering Czech?
            >
            > Examples:
            >
            > "S^pagety" must have entered Czech by way of German, because if it
            > hadn't, it would probably be "spagety".
            >
            > "Chuligán" must have entered Czech through Russian or maybe Polish,
            > because if it had come in directly from English, it would be
            > "huligán".
            >
            > Does anyone know any more?
            >
            > Jamie

            --
            "Humans are flat!"
            - the 6th blind elephant
          • Milan Condak
            Prumyslova revoluce: Anglie 1700, Francie 1800, Nemecko 1850, Cesko 1890 EN monkey key FR clé anglaise DE französische Schlüssel (Fransoze) CS francouzsky
            Message 5 of 9 , Aug 19, 2005
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              Prumyslova revoluce: Anglie 1700, Francie 1800, Nemecko 1850, Cesko 1890

              EN monkey key
              FR clé anglaise
              DE französische Schlüssel (Fransoze)
              CS francouzsky klic
              ---
              Ve Walesu po zahajeni hlubinne tezby uhli vyvinuli hodne naradi, stroju a
              pristroju. Ty se dovazely do Francie a Belgie,
              z Belgie do Nemecka. Z Nemecka a Rakouska do ceskych zemi a Polska.
              --
              Pocitacova revoluce: USA, Anglie, Japonsko, Cina a globalizace
              Informace vznikaji kazdy den, nova slova a jejich preklady take

              Milan
            • James Kirchner
              There s one that s more like a calque. pomme de terre Erdapfel erteple Jamie ... ... ... ... [Non-text portions of
              Message 6 of 9 , Aug 20, 2005
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                There's one that's more like a calque.

                pomme de terre > Erdapfel > erteple

                Jamie

                On Friday, August 19, 2005, at 08:36 PM, Michael Gmail wrote:

                > I imagine there must be quite a few that came from French by way of 
                > German, though I'm drawing a blank right now in trying to think of 
                > any....
                >
                > Michael
                >
                >
                >
                > On Aug 19, 2005, at 6:40 PM, James Kirchner wrote:
                >
                > > Can anybody think of examples of loan words that show evidence that
                > > they passed through a second language before entering Czech?
                > >
                > > Examples:
                > >
                > > "S^pagety" must have entered Czech by way of German, because if it
                > > hadn't, it would probably be "spagety".
                > >
                > > "Chuligán" must have entered Czech through Russian or maybe Polish,
                > > because if it had come in directly from English, it would be 
                > > "huligán".
                > >
                > > Does anyone know any more?
                > >
                > > Jamie
                >
                > --
                > "Humans are flat!"
                > - the 6th blind elephant
                >
                >
                >
                >
                > Czechlist resources:
                > http://www.bohemica.com/czechtranslation
                >
                >
                >
                >
                >
                >
                >
                >
                >
                >
                >
                >
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                [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
              • James Kirchner
                ... CZ spanelska vesnice DE böhmisches Dorf Except I think I was looking more for words whose phonological form indicates their route through the languages.
                Message 7 of 9 , Aug 20, 2005
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                  On Saturday, August 20, 2005, at 02:51 AM, Milan Condak wrote:

                  > EN monkey key
                  > FR clé anglaise
                  > DE französische Schlüssel (Fransoze)
                  > CS francouzsky klic

                  CZ spanelska vesnice
                  DE böhmisches Dorf

                  Except I think I was looking more for words whose phonological form
                  indicates their route through the languages.

                  Jamie
                • melvyn.geo
                  ... they passed through a second language before entering Czech? A very good source for this kind of info is the two-volume Akademicky slovnik cizich slov. ...
                  Message 8 of 9 , Aug 21, 2005
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                    --- In Czechlist@yahoogroups.com, James Kirchner <jpklists@s...> wrote:
                    >Can anybody think of examples of loan words that show evidence that
                    they passed through a second language before entering Czech?

                    A very good source for this kind of info is the two-volume Akademicky
                    slovnik cizich slov.


                    >"Chuligán" must have entered Czech through Russian or maybe Polish,
                    because if it had come in directly from English, it would be "huligán".

                    ASCS agrees that it came from English via Russian.


                    >"S^pagety" must have entered Czech by way of German, because if it
                    hadn't, it would probably be "spagety".

                    No mention of German here. Only Italian. I reckon the reason could be
                    that spoken Czech often resorts to German-style pronunciation of such
                    consonantal clusters by default. However, Spagat is given as Italian
                    via German.

                    Looking at random at the s^ words I come across skapulir (Latin via
                    German), skorpion (Latin via German) and spenat (Persian! via German).


                    >Does anyone know any more?

                    Will keep an eye out. What other tell-tale phonological signs could
                    there be?

                    M.
                    The important thing is not to stop questioning. Curiosity has its own
                    reason for existing. One cannot help but be in awe when he
                    contemplates the mysteries of eternity, of life, of the marvelous
                    structure of reality. It is enough if one tries merely to comprehend a
                    little of this mystery every day. Never lose a holy curiosity.

                    - Albert Einstein
                  • James Kirchner
                    ... That s right. As in s^nek bar . Thanks for the tip about the dictionary. Jamie [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                    Message 9 of 9 , Aug 21, 2005
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                      On Sunday, August 21, 2005, at 03:50 AM, melvyn.geo wrote:

                      > I reckon the reason could be
                      > that spoken Czech often resorts to German-style pronunciation of such
                      > consonantal clusters by default.

                      That's right. As in "s^nek bar".

                      Thanks for the tip about the dictionary.

                      Jamie



                      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
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