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zastavni pravo

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  • Zuzana Kočičková
    Hi Czechlisters, is there any difference between security interest and collateral ? Thanks for your opinions. Zuzana [Non-text portions of this message
    Message 1 of 4 , Apr 30, 2005
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      Hi Czechlisters,

      is there any difference between
      "security interest" and "collateral" ?


      Thanks for your opinions.

      Zuzana



      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • James Kirchner
      ... According to http://dictionary.law.com, there appears to be a difference. collateral 1) n. property pledged to secure a loan or debt, usually funds or
      Message 2 of 4 , Apr 30, 2005
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        On Saturday, April 30, 2005, at 08:10 AM, Zuzana Ko�i�kov� wrote:

        > is there any difference between
        > "security interest" and "collateral" ?

        According to http://dictionary.law.com, there appears to be a
        difference.

        collateral
        1) n. property pledged to secure a loan or debt, usually funds or
        personal property as distinguished from real property (but technically
        collateral can include real estate). 2) adj. referring to something
        that is going on at the same time parallel to the main issue in a
        lawsuit or controversy which may affect the outcome of the case, such
        as adoption of a new federal regulation or a criminal trial of one of
        the parties. Example: John has filed a lawsuit in New Mexico, where he
        lives, to establish that he is not the father of Betty's child, while
        Betty has filed for divorce in Colorado asking that John pay child
        support for the child. The New Mexico paternity suit is collateral to
        the Colorado divorce action.

        security interest
        n. generic term for the property rights of a lender or creditor whose
        right to collect a debt is secured by property.

        Jamie



        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      • Michael Trittipo
        ... Yes. A security interest is what one has in collateral. The former describes a certain kind of legal right; the latter describes some thing of value
        Message 3 of 4 , Apr 30, 2005
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          On Sat, Apr 30, 2005 at 02:10:06PM +0200, Zuzana Kočičková wrote:
          > Hi Czechlisters,
          >
          > is there any difference between
          > "security interest" and "collateral" ?

          Yes. A "security interest" is what one has in "collateral." The former describes a certain kind of legal right; the latter describes some thing of value as to which someone has that kind of right. I say that you can take my computer if I don't pay you some money I owe you. The computer is now collateral (although I keep it in my possession); what you have by virtue of my promise is a security interest in my computer. That doesn't make the computer into a security interest; the computer is still just collateral.

          I'd look for some definitions, but I think the above should be clear enough even without a precise defintion.

          Hope it helps.
        • Zuzana Kočičková
          Thanks a million James and Michael. Now I know how to use these terms. BR Zuzana ... From: Michael Trittipo To:
          Message 4 of 4 , May 1, 2005
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            Thanks a million James and Michael. Now I know how to use these terms.

            BR

            Zuzana
            ----- Original Message -----
            From: "Michael Trittipo" <tritt002@...>
            To: <Czechlist@yahoogroups.com>
            Sent: Sunday, May 01, 2005 5:39 AM
            Subject: Re: [Czechlist] zastavni pravo


            > On Sat, Apr 30, 2005 at 02:10:06PM +0200, Zuzana Kočičková wrote:
            > > Hi Czechlisters,
            > >
            > > is there any difference between
            > > "security interest" and "collateral" ?
            >
            > Yes. A "security interest" is what one has in "collateral." The former
            describes a certain kind of legal right; the latter describes some thing of
            value as to which someone has that kind of right. I say that you can take
            my computer if I don't pay you some money I owe you. The computer is now
            collateral (although I keep it in my possession); what you have by virtue of
            my promise is a security interest in my computer. That doesn't make the
            computer into a security interest; the computer is still just collateral.
            >
            > I'd look for some definitions, but I think the above should be clear
            enough even without a precise defintion.
            >
            > Hope it helps.
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