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RE: [Czechlist] ODDYCHOVY AND SPOLECENSKY CASOPIS??

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  • Jirka Bolech
    Hi Matej, as there probably isn t one broadly accepted way of classifying periodicals I dare suggest calling ... leisure magazines , and ... social
    Message 1 of 9 , Feb 1, 2005
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      Hi Matej,

      as there probably isn't one broadly accepted way of classifying periodicals
      I dare suggest calling

      > - oddychove casopisy

      'leisure magazines', and

      > - spolecenske casopisy

      'social magazines'...

      Jirka Bolech
    • James Kirchner
      ... I think these would be called leisure magazines or leisure publications . All together with certain kinds of books, they are called leisure reading ,
      Message 2 of 9 , Feb 1, 2005
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        On Tuesday, February 1, 2005, at 05:27 AM, Terminus Technicus wrote:

        > Hi list,
        >
        > struggling with a poorly-written consummer survey report on magazines,
        > can't
        > come up with a good idea for the following classification of magazines:
        >
        > - oddychove casopisy (they mean something one reads in a tram,
        > something
        > that's not too serious, but not just tabloids...definition: témata pro
        > chvíle volna, nijak nárocného zamerení, zábavná, ale i praktická (viz.
        > tituly pro zeny - rady do domácnosti apod.))...
        >
        > have free-time magazines as a tentative solution, but not happy with
        > it...

        I think these would be called "leisure magazines" or "leisure
        publications". All together with certain kinds of books, they are
        called "leisure reading", at least in the US. If they are aimed at a
        certain demographic group that lives a certain way, they are called
        "lifestyle magazines". Betinka would be a lifestyle magazine.

        > - spolecenske casopisy (meaning current affair stuff, like tyden and
        > Reflex
        > in CZ, or Time/Newsweek elsewhere), perhaps current affair magazines
        > is a
        > good solution, but don't we have something shorter??

        Time, Newsweek, Der Spiegel and Tyden are called "news magazines".
        Reflex and Mlady svet are not exactly news magazines, but might be
        considered "current affairs magazines" (with "affairs" in the plural).
        I think you're stuck with that long term, unless I can think of
        something shorter in the next couple of hours. The two classifications
        together would be called "current affairs magazines", but in a real
        stretch you might be able to call Reflex and Mlady svet "news
        magazines". However, those two get dangerously close to being "gossip
        magazines" to really be considered hard news mags.

        Jamie


        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      • James Kirchner
        ... I don t agree with this one. Social magazine doesn t exist, as far as I know, and I don t think English speakers would understand what that meant. We
        Message 3 of 9 , Feb 1, 2005
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          On Tuesday, February 1, 2005, at 06:20 AM, Jirka Bolech wrote:

          > > - spolecenske casopisy
          >
          > 'social magazines'...

          I don't agree with this one. "Social magazine" doesn't exist, as far
          as I know, and I don't think English speakers would understand what
          that meant. We do have "society magazines", which are the type that
          show bad photos of Karel Gott, Helena Vondraskova and Lucie Bila at
          parties, or if they're not party animals, walking down the street
          trying not to be recognized. They are basically gossip magazines for
          more literate readers.

          Jamie



          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        • Jirka Bolech
          ... That was my blind shot. It seems like this expressions is used in non-native English only. As a matter of fact gossip was another attributive that
          Message 4 of 9 , Feb 1, 2005
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            >> 'social magazines'...

            > I don't agree with this one.

            That was my blind shot. It seems like this expressions is used in non-native
            English only. As a matter of fact 'gossip' was another attributive that
            occurred to me at the same time but I thought it was much too the same as
            'tabloid'.

            Jirka Bolech
          • James Kirchner
            ... Actually, tabloid is a strange term itself, because it mixes gossip and sensationalist journalism, so it s bulvarni. Jamie [Non-text portions of this
            Message 5 of 9 , Feb 1, 2005
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              On Tuesday, February 1, 2005, at 07:20 AM, Jirka Bolech wrote:

              > >> 'social magazines'...
              >
              > > I don't agree with this one.
              >
              > That was my blind shot. It seems like this expressions is used in
              > non-native
              > English only. As a matter of fact 'gossip' was another attributive that
              > occurred to me at the same time but I thought it was much too the same
              > as
              > 'tabloid'.

              Actually, "tabloid" is a strange term itself, because it mixes gossip
              and sensationalist journalism, so it's bulvarni.

              Jamie



              [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
            • James Kirchner
              By the way, a sub-category of investigative report is investigative interview . Jamie
              Message 6 of 9 , Feb 1, 2005
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                By the way, a sub-category of investigative report is "investigative
                interview".

                Jamie
              • Jirka Bolech
                ... and sensationalist journalism, so it s bulvarni. And here s how the format, or size, and the word got its birth: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Broadsheet...
                Message 7 of 9 , Feb 1, 2005
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                  > Actually, "tabloid" is a strange term itself, because it mixes gossip
                  and sensationalist journalism, so it's bulvarni.

                  And here's how the format, or size, and the word got its birth:
                  http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Broadsheet...

                  Jirka Bolech
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