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Re: [Czechlist] PLUS MORE TERMS...TERMS: zasilka, obalovy kus atd.

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  • James Kirchner
    ... How else can the guy say it? ... The solution in this situation, then, is to assign the translation to a native speaker, explain who will be reading it,
    Message 1 of 4 , Dec 30, 2004
      On Thursday, December 30, 2004, at 12:39 PM, Hana Viansová wrote:

      >> ----  You know, you really shouldn't be translating into English.

      > Well... that sounds a little rough though I see your point.

      How else can the guy say it?

      > The thing with
      > this translation is that although the translation is into English it
      > will
      > moslty be read by Germans, Austrians, the French, etc and very rarely
      > by
      > native speakers of English, which is why I guess it suits them to have
      > this
      > translated by another non-native speaker since the language will be
      > closer
      > to what they are used to hearing/reading.

      The solution in this situation, then, is to assign the translation to a
      native speaker, explain who will be reading it, and then request that
      the translation be put into simple English. The answer is not to
      translate it into foreigner English.

      If the document is put into foreigner English, there is the danger that
      the rare native English speaker you said may read it will not even
      UNDERSTAND a lot of it, as happened recently when a German I know was
      sent away by the department of motor vehicles because the translation
      of his German license was not comprehensible.

      The other danger is that parts of your document will be used in other
      documents that WILL be used by native speakers. Once that ball gets
      rolling -- an "approved" translation taken from a previous "approved"
      translation, and it from one still before that -- it's hard to get the
      new stuff put into understandable English. Here I have had managers
      insist that absolute nonsense be printed in Spanish because "it has
      been used before!"

      A further problem is that the bad English can get spread around and
      become people's ordinary lingo that they expect native speakers to
      understand. You wouldn't believe the number of terminology problems
      encountered by German managers I teach ESL to, just because they use
      SAP software all day. SAP is often "localized" into Germlish, and this
      encourages its German users to employ phony English terminology that
      their colleagues can't understand.

      Jamie

      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
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