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Re: [Czechlist] THANKS nomad + southern accent + vyhledavani

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  • Hana Viansová
    Diky vsem, kdo mi pomohli s vyhledavaci (tam jsem se asi fakt sekla), kocovanim a jizanskym prizvukem. Preposilam prizvuk kamaradce, at si z toho vybere, co
    Message 1 of 1 , Nov 7, 2004
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      Diky vsem, kdo mi pomohli s vyhledavaci (tam jsem se asi fakt sekla),
      kocovanim a jizanskym prizvukem. Preposilam prizvuk kamaradce, at si z toho
      vybere, co chce, ja uz si po deseti letech od skoly nepamatuju dost na to,
      abych se k tomu kriticky vyjadrila:-))).
      Melvyn, the lyrics sound absolutely LOVELY - can you sing that song? I love
      those O´s at the end of each line- I´ll bet the tune goes up?
      Jamie, it´s really impressive that you just casually walk around with all
      that stuffed in your head (though you´ll probably reply that anyone who
      doesn´t want to be labeled a babbling idiot should know at least THAT
      much:-))). Thanks a lot

      Hanka
      ----- Original Message -----
      From: "melvyn.geo" <zehrovak@...>
      To: <Czechlist@yahoogroups.com>
      Sent: Sunday, November 07, 2004 1:00 AM
      Subject: [Czechlist] Re: nomad + southern accent




      Hana wrote:
      > I´m looking for a verb which indicates what Gypsies have always done
      > - travel from place to place without a fixed place to live. What I´ve
      found
      > so far carries the meaning (have a transient/nomadic lifestyle) but what I
      > need is a verb ("Romove kocuji").


      I think you'll find this idea is conveyed more often by a phrase (or at
      least a phrasal verb) than a single word. Fronek's suggestion 'lead a
      nomadic life' might be good for describing the big picture, while 'lead an
      itinerant life/lifestyle' might be heard in more mundane bureaucratic and
      journalistic language. If you really insist on a single word (but why??),
      Michael's 'rove' and 'roam' are fine, or you might simply consider 'travel'
      (groups of itinerants are often referred to in the British press as
      'travellers', whether they are Roma, tinkers, hippies or whatever, and your
      phrase 'travel [about] from place to place' sounds to me like a perfectly
      natural way of rendering 'kocovat') or how about 'wander' ('wander from
      place to place' sounds fine to me) or Fronek's 'migrate'?


      > Two - I had an American friend over and she, thinking I was the expert in
      > everything concerning English language + history,

      Well, you are.

      >asked what the origin of
      > the southern drawl was. She found it strange as it so much differs from
      the
      > original accent of those who first inhabited those parts. Any insights on
      > this?
      >

      I am not very insightful when it comes to American dialects but in amongst
      all the theories on the subject involving inbreeding and bad oral hygiene I
      found the following interesting ideas:


      http://pandora.cii.wwu.edu/vajda/ling201/test3materials/AmericanDialects.htm

      From 1642-1675 the Royalists, also called Cavaliers, fled from the south and
      southwest England with their indentured servants and settled in Virginia
      when the English Civil War against Charles I began. They brought with them
      their south England drawl (a drawing out of the vowels);

      NOT VERY ACCURATE HISTORICALLY (THE DATING IS WAY OUT)BUT OTHERWISE NOT A
      TOTALLY BAD THEORY IMHO - SOUTHERN ENGLISH UPPER CLASS ACCENTS DO HAVE SOME
      SIMILAR VOWELS - BUT THEN A LITTLE FURTHER DOWN I READ:

      Most linguists today believe these features derive from the influence of the
      speech patterns of the Africans brought to the 13 colonies as slaves between
      1619 and 1808, when the slave trade was prohibited. This would include the
      southern drawl.

      BUT:

      http://listserv.linguistlist.org/cgi-bin/wa?A2==ind0007a&L=%c2%ads-l&D==1&F==&S==
      &P=u53

      I find it interesting that the first explanation that is suggested is
      "African-American slave influence." Caribbean English varieties don't have a
      drawl, nor do West African varieties. Ah! the "black nanny myth" again.

      Salikoko S. Mufwene
      University of Chicago
      Department of Linguistics

      In any case, 'drawl' is probably a contentious description amongst
      linguists.


      BR

      Melvyn
      ---
      We used to sing this song at primary school:

      Three gypsies stood at the castle gate. They sang so high, they sang so low.
      The lady sate in her chamber late. Her heart it melted away as snow.

      They sang so sweet, they sang so shrill. That fast her tears began to flow
      And she lay down her silken gown, her golden rings and all her show.

      She took it off her high-heeled shoes, a-made of Spanish leather-O
      She would in the street in her bare, bare feet, all out in the wind and
      weather-O.

      Saddle to me my milk white steed and go and fetch me my pony-O
      That I may ride and seek my bride who's gone with the wraggle taggle
      gypsies-O!

      He rode high and he rode low, he rode through woods and copses too
      Until he came to an open field and there he espied his a-lady-O.

      "What makes you leave your house and land, your golden treasures for to go?
      What makes you leave your new wedded lord, to follow the wraggle taggle
      gypsies-O?"

      "What care I for my house and land? What care I for my treasures-O?
      What care I for my new wedded lord? I'm off with the wraggle taggle
      gypsies-O!"

      "Last night you slept on a goose-feathered bed, with the sheet turned down
      so bravely-O.
      Tonight you sleep in a cold open field along with the wraggle taggle
      gypsies-O!"

      "What care I for the goose-feathered bed with the sheet turned down so
      bravely-O?
      Tonight I shall sleep in a cold open field along with the wraggle taggle
      gypsies-O!"









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