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Re: [Czechlist] Re: sweet vs. desert

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  • Terminus Technicus
    Sorry Jamie, I wasn t trying to ignore you, just took the weekend off and changed into my bricklaying mode... Dylan s already explained the socio-geographical
    Message 1 of 32 , Oct 3, 2004
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      Sorry Jamie, I wasn't trying to ignore you, just took the weekend off and
      changed into my bricklaying mode...

      Dylan's already explained the socio-geographical facts, my sentence was
      merely trying to say that because the tidbits someone uttered during a focus
      groups and that were so important that they had to be included in the
      resport between inverted commas are often very informal, distinctly Zizkov
      (the end closer to Hlavni nadrazi), to keep the analogy... anyway, I was
      trying to say that as I am using informal BritEng in those bits (what I
      learned around building sites in various parts of England, well, only a
      small part of what I learned there), it would sound odd if I suddenly
      changed into American in the formal part of the report..

      East Enders is a soap opera, people put on fake working-class (possibly East
      London, I wouldn't know) accents in it...

      Matej




      ----- Original Message -----
      From: "James Kirchner" <jpklists@...>
      To: <Czechlist@yahoogroups.com>
      Sent: Sunday, October 03, 2004 2:17 PM
      Subject: Re: [Czechlist] Re: sweet vs. desert


      >
      >
      > > > > especially as I'm trying for a bit of
      > > > > a "East Enders" approach (well, maybe not EE, but working class)
      > > with the verbatims/quotes...
      >
      > And would someone British please explain this to me? I actually want
      > to know. "East Ender" obviously refers to people who live in a certain
      > geographic location (probably a part of London), but what is the place
      > like and what would an "East Enders" approach mean? I'm as in the dark
      > about this as I was about "sloany".
      >
      > Jamie
      >
      >
      > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      >
      >
      >
      >
      > Czechlist resources:
      > http://www.bohemica.com/czechtranslation
      >
      > Obcasnik:
      > http://zehrovak.bloguje.cz
      > Yahoo! Groups Links
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
    • Martina Silpoch
      to add a little to this tasty conversation - we have several places in town selling frozen custard. Very delicious and fattening, tastes like thick, full
      Message 32 of 32 , Oct 5, 2004
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        to add a little to this tasty conversation - we have several places
        in town selling frozen custard. Very delicious and fattening, tastes
        like thick, full bodied ice cream. That makes the idea that custard
        is eaten warm go out the window:)
        M.

        --- In Czechlist@yahoogroups.com, "jsyeaton" <jsyeaton@y...> wrote:
        >
        > Work a little slow, Simon?
        >
        > --- In Czechlist@yahoogroups.com, "raesim" <rachelandsimon@q...>
        wrote:
        > >
        > > --- In Czechlist@yahoogroups.com, "raesim" <rachelandsimon@q...>
        > > wrote:
        > > > > So vanilla pudink mix is basically identical to British
        instant
        > > > > custard powder.
        > > >
        > > > The difference is in how they tend to be eaten: pudink cold
        and
        > > > congealed and on its own, custard hot and runny and on top of
        > > > something.
        > >
        > > Of course, custard is eaten cold and congealed in trifle and
        creme
        > > caramel. And I think it's delicious on its own...
        > >
        > > Simon
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