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kousat, rozkousat a sweet??

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  • Terminus Technicus
    Thanks again Dylan, sweets will do... Another interesting concept, not sure if I have the right word(s) for: rozkousat bonbon kousat bonbon bonbony na kousani
    Message 1 of 20 , Oct 1, 2004
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      Thanks again Dylan, sweets will do...

      Another interesting concept, not sure if I have the right word(s) for:

      rozkousat bonbon
      kousat bonbon
      bonbony na kousani (as opposed to those 'na cucani')
      Bonbony by se nemely kousat...

      What would and English mother say to their kids when they crack their teeth
      on a hard sweet?? (Nekousejte to!!!)

      Don't mince them?

      Thanks

      M
    • melvyn.geo
      ... In a formal context you could also consider confectionery . ... No. I d expect something like: Don t crunch them - just suck them. Bite might
      Message 2 of 20 , Oct 1, 2004
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        --- In Czechlist@yahoogroups.com, "Terminus Technicus" <czechlist@t...> wrote:
        > Thanks again Dylan, sweets will do...


        In a formal context you could also consider 'confectionery'.

        > What would and English mother say to their kids when they crack their teeth
        > on a hard sweet?? (Nekousejte to!!!)
        >
        > Don't mince them?
        >
        No.

        I'd expect something like: 'Don't crunch them - just suck them.' 'Bite' might conceivably be used but it normally just refers to a single action.

        If the kids are eating sweets noisily: 'Don't crunch! Oooh, it goes right through me!' How would you say that in Czech?

        M.
      • Terminus Technicus
        ... through me! How would you say that in Czech? Say what - don t crunch em? Nekousejte je- do nich, nerozkousavejte je technically crunch is drtit, but you
        Message 3 of 20 , Oct 1, 2004
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          > If the kids are eating sweets noisily: 'Don't crunch! Oooh, it goes right
          through me!' How would you say that in Czech?

          Say what - don't crunch'em? Nekousejte je- do nich, nerozkousavejte je

          technically crunch is drtit, but you don't "drti" sweets with your teeth...
          you could "drtit" them in a hmozdir, though, or with a heavy object, for
          some weird purpose...

          Thanks, didn't think of crunching

          Matej
        • Terminus Technicus
          Hmm, another thought.. OK, don t crunch them from mother to kids, but what about bonbony na kousani as opposed to bonbony na cucani ? (used as a semi-formal
          Message 4 of 20 , Oct 1, 2004
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            Hmm, another thought.. OK, don't crunch them from mother to kids, but what
            about "bonbony na kousani" as opposed to "bonbony na cucani"?

            (used as a semi-formal name for a category of sweets?)

            Is 'sweets to be crunched' OK here???

            Thanks again

            M
          • melvyn.geo
            ... Can t say I ve ever come across a sweet that you are not officially allowed to chew. All sounds a bit anal retentive to me. Pills maybe, but not sweets.
            Message 5 of 20 , Oct 1, 2004
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              --- In Czechlist@yahoogroups.com, "Terminus Technicus" <czechlist@t...> wrote:

              > rozkousat bonbon
              > kousat bonbon
              > bonbony na kousani (as opposed to those 'na cucani')
              > Bonbony by se nemely kousat...

              Can't say I've ever come across a sweet that you are not officially allowed to chew. All sounds a bit anal retentive to me. Pills maybe, but not sweets. Still, 'chew' is the word I would go for in a formal context to contrast with 'suck', whereas 'crunch' is less formal and more expressive.

              M.
            • Terminus Technicus
              Hmm, but what about the difference between hard sweets (say Haslerky , or Rollos), that you crunch (kousat).. (and that your mother would tell you not to
              Message 6 of 20 , Oct 1, 2004
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                Hmm,

                but what about the difference between hard sweets (say 'Haslerky', or
                Rollos), that you crunch (kousat).. (and that your mother would tell you not
                to 'kousat')
                and soft(er) like Mentos, the rubber bears, whatever, that you chew
                (zvykat)?? (that are supposed to be chewed)

                I guess chewing has a broader base in ENG than zvykani in Czech, but the
                report sort of makes this distinction... BTW, it's not talking about "not
                being allowed to chew", but about sweets intended to be chewed/crunched and
                those intended to be sucked...

                I think chewing will do for the general category and crunching for when
                we're sure that it's a hard one and someone's trying to chip their teeth on
                it...

                Thanks Melvyn, have an M&M (or whatever your favorite is) and don't crunch
                on it if it's hard :)!

                M



                ----- Original Message -----
                From: "melvyn.geo" <zehrovak@...>
                To: <Czechlist@yahoogroups.com>
                Sent: Friday, October 01, 2004 12:59 PM
                Subject: [Czechlist] Re: kousat, rozkousat a sweet??


                > --- In Czechlist@yahoogroups.com, "Terminus Technicus" <czechlist@t...>
                wrote:
                >
                > > rozkousat bonbon
                > > kousat bonbon
                > > bonbony na kousani (as opposed to those 'na cucani')
                > > Bonbony by se nemely kousat...
                >
                > Can't say I've ever come across a sweet that you are not officially
                allowed to chew. All sounds a bit anal retentive to me. Pills maybe, but not
                sweets. Still, 'chew' is the word I would go for in a formal context to
                contrast with 'suck', whereas 'crunch' is less formal and more expressive.
                >
                > M.
                >
                >
                >
                >
                >
                >
                > Czechlist resources:
                > http://www.bohemica.com/czechtranslation
                >
                > Obcasnik:
                > http://zehrovak.bloguje.cz
                > Yahoo! Groups Links
                >
                >
                >
                >
                >
                >
              • melvyn.geo
                ... I had to mentally masticate this part of your question for a few minutes before I came up with my solution, which crossed in the post. For pills, lozenges,
                Message 7 of 20 , Oct 1, 2004
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                  --- In Czechlist@yahoogroups.com, "Terminus Technicus" <czechlist@t...> wrote:

                  > Hmm, another thought.. OK, don't crunch them from mother to kids, but what
                  > about "bonbony na kousani" as opposed to "bonbony na cucani"?
                  >
                  > (used as a semi-formal name for a category of sweets?)

                  I had to mentally masticate this part of your question for a few minutes before I came up with my solution, which crossed in the post. For pills, lozenges, cough drops etc I'd expect something like "to be chewed", "may be chewed" or possibly even "chewable".
                  >
                  > > If the kids are eating sweets noisily: 'Don't crunch! Oooh, it goes right
                  > through me!' How would you say that in Czech?
                  >
                  > Say what - don't crunch'em?

                  No, it goes right through me. The kind of thing you might say if somebody slowly drew a long fingernail down a piece of chalk.

                  M.
                • James Kirchner
                  ... Bite into a piece of candy (or bite into candy). ... Bite a piece of candy (or bite candy). ... chewy candy (as opposed to hard candy) ... The candy should
                  Message 8 of 20 , Oct 1, 2004
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                    On Friday, October 1, 2004, at 06:02 AM, Terminus Technicus wrote:

                    > Thanks again Dylan, sweets will do...
                    >
                    > Another interesting concept, not sure if I have the right word(s) for:
                    >
                    > rozkousat bonbon

                    Bite into a piece of candy (or bite into candy).

                    > kousat bonbon

                    Bite a piece of candy (or bite candy).

                    > bonbony na kousani (as opposed to those 'na cucani')

                    chewy candy (as opposed to hard candy)

                    > Bonbony by se nemely kousat...

                    The candy should not be bitten...

                    > What would and English mother say to their kids when they crack their
                    > teeth
                    > on a hard sweet?? (Nekousejte to!!!)

                    My parents told me time and again, "Stop biting hard candy!" or, "Stop
                    biting that!" I used to run into the bathroom and close the door when
                    I was about 4, just so that I could bite hard candy without my parents
                    knowing.

                    I also have the unfortunate habit of biting ice cream. When I was
                    about 25, a woman I worked with told me to stop it, explaining that the
                    girl of my dreams could come past, see me biting my ice cream, deduce
                    that I was in "insensitive male", and keep walking. I would never
                    know, according to her, that I had missed my future spouse, just
                    because I was biting my ice cream!

                    Jamie


                    [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                  • James Kirchner
                    ... Here you can only crunch things that are crunchy. You can crunch potato chips, or crunch roasted chick peas sprinkled with chili powder, as I did
                    Message 9 of 20 , Oct 1, 2004
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                      On Friday, October 1, 2004, at 06:56 AM, Terminus Technicus wrote:

                      > > If the kids are eating sweets noisily: 'Don't crunch! Oooh, it goes
                      > right
                      > through me!' How would you say that in Czech?
                      >
                      > Say what - don't crunch'em? Nekousejte je- do nich, nerozkousavejte je
                      >
                      > technically crunch is drtit, but you don't "drti" sweets with your
                      > teeth...
                      > you could "drtit" them in a hmozdir, though, or with a heavy object,
                      > for
                      > some weird purpose...
                      >
                      > Thanks, didn't think of crunching

                      Here you can only crunch things that are crunchy. You can crunch
                      potato chips, or crunch roasted chick peas sprinkled with chili powder,
                      as I did yesterday (a terrific Mexican snack from the gas station).
                      But for hard candy, we'd say bite.

                      Jamie


                      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                    • Terminus Technicus
                      ... slowly drew a long fingernail down a piece of chalk. Brrr, mam z toho husi kuzi Brr, vstavaji mi z toho vlasy (nebo chlupy na zadech), zalezi na ochlupeni
                      Message 10 of 20 , Oct 1, 2004
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                        > No, it goes right through me. The kind of thing you might say if somebody
                        slowly drew a long fingernail down a piece of chalk.

                        Brrr, mam z toho husi kuzi
                        Brr, vstavaji mi z toho vlasy (nebo chlupy na zadech), zalezi na ochlupeni
                        mluvciho


                        M
                      • James Kirchner
                        ... We call those hard candy. ... Gummi bears (that s what we call them here) and similar things are called chewy candy here. I don t know what to call powdery
                        Message 11 of 20 , Oct 1, 2004
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                          On Friday, October 1, 2004, at 07:36 AM, Terminus Technicus wrote:

                          > but what about the difference between hard sweets (say 'Haslerky', or
                          > Rollos), that you crunch (kousat).. (and that your mother would tell
                          > you not
                          > to 'kousat')

                          We call those hard candy.

                          > and soft(er) like Mentos, the rubber bears, whatever, that you chew
                          > (zvykat)?? (that are supposed to be chewed)

                          Gummi bears (that's what we call them here) and similar things are
                          called chewy candy here.

                          I don't know what to call powdery candy that is meant to be bitten into
                          (such as wintergreen lozenges) but is not chewy.

                          Jamie

                          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                        • Terminus Technicus
                          ... Yeah, right, but do you crunch them or chew them??? ... So you chew those, I suppose (no pun intended) M
                          Message 12 of 20 , Oct 1, 2004
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                            > On Friday, October 1, 2004, at 07:36 AM, Terminus Technicus wrote:
                            >
                            > > but what about the difference between hard sweets (say 'Haslerky', or
                            > > Rollos), that you crunch (kousat).. (and that your mother would tell
                            > > you not
                            > > to 'kousat')
                            >
                            > We call those hard candy.

                            Yeah, right, but do you crunch them or chew them???

                            > > and soft(er) like Mentos, the rubber bears, whatever, that you chew
                            > > (zvykat)?? (that are supposed to be chewed)
                            >
                            > Gummi bears (that's what we call them here) and similar things are
                            > called chewy candy here.

                            So you chew those, I suppose (no pun intended)

                            M
                          • James Kirchner
                            ... Chewable is what you say about kids medicine or vitamins here. If the client says candy , it s almost a sure thing they call that candy chewy . Jamie
                            Message 13 of 20 , Oct 1, 2004
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                              On Friday, October 1, 2004, at 07:45 AM, melvyn.geo wrote:

                              > --- In Czechlist@yahoogroups.com, "Terminus Technicus"
                              > <czechlist@t...> wrote:
                              >
                              > > Hmm, another thought.. OK, don't crunch them from mother to kids,
                              > but what
                              > > about "bonbony na kousani" as opposed to "bonbony na cucani"?
                              > >
                              > > (used as a semi-formal name for a category of sweets?)
                              >
                              > I had to mentally masticate this part of your question for a few
                              > minutes before I came up with my solution, which crossed in the post.
                              > For pills, lozenges, cough drops etc I'd expect something like "to be
                              > chewed", "may be chewed" or possibly even "chewable".

                              "Chewable" is what you say about kids' medicine or vitamins here. If
                              the client says "candy", it's almost a sure thing they call that candy
                              "chewy".

                              Jamie

                              [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                            • James Kirchner
                              ... If you bear down on them with your teeth once, you are biting them. If you continue to masticate them, you are chewing them. ... Chewy candy is meant to
                              Message 14 of 20 , Oct 1, 2004
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                                On Friday, October 1, 2004, at 08:05 AM, Terminus Technicus wrote:

                                > > On Friday, October 1, 2004, at 07:36 AM, Terminus Technicus wrote:
                                > >
                                > > > but what about the difference between hard sweets (say 'Haslerky',
                                > or
                                > > > Rollos), that you crunch (kousat).. (and that your mother would
                                > tell
                                > > > you not
                                > > > to 'kousat')
                                > >
                                > > We call those hard candy.
                                >
                                > Yeah, right, but do you crunch them or chew them???

                                If you bear down on them with your teeth once, you are biting them. If
                                you continue to masticate them, you are chewing them.

                                > > > and soft(er) like Mentos, the rubber bears, whatever, that you chew
                                > > > (zvykat)?? (that are supposed to be chewed)
                                > >
                                > > Gummi bears (that's what we call them here) and similar things are
                                > > called chewy candy here.
                                >
                                > So you chew those, I suppose (no pun intended)

                                Chewy candy is meant to be chewed, yes.

                                Jamie


                                [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                              • Jan Culka
                                Nechroustej ... From: melvyn.geo To: Sent: Friday, October 01, 2004 1:45 PM Subject: [Czechlist] Re: kousat,
                                Message 15 of 20 , Oct 1, 2004
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                                  Nechroustej


                                  ----- Original Message -----
                                  From: "melvyn.geo" <zehrovak@...>
                                  To: <Czechlist@yahoogroups.com>
                                  Sent: Friday, October 01, 2004 1:45 PM
                                  Subject: [Czechlist] Re: kousat, rozkousat + AAAARGH


                                  > --- In Czechlist@yahoogroups.com, "Terminus Technicus" <czechlist@t...>
                                  wrote:
                                  >
                                  > > Hmm, another thought.. OK, don't crunch them from mother to kids, but
                                  what
                                  > > about "bonbony na kousani" as opposed to "bonbony na cucani"?
                                  > >
                                  > > (used as a semi-formal name for a category of sweets?)
                                  >
                                  > I had to mentally masticate this part of your question for a few minutes
                                  before I came up with my solution, which crossed in the post. For pills,
                                  lozenges, cough drops etc I'd expect something like "to be chewed", "may be
                                  chewed" or possibly even "chewable".
                                  > >
                                  > > > If the kids are eating sweets noisily: 'Don't crunch! Oooh, it goes
                                  right
                                  > > through me!' How would you say that in Czech?
                                  > >
                                  > > Say what - don't crunch'em?
                                  >
                                  > No, it goes right through me. The kind of thing you might say if somebody
                                  slowly drew a long fingernail down a piece of chalk.
                                  >
                                  > M.
                                  >
                                  >
                                  >
                                  >
                                  >
                                  >
                                  >
                                  > Czechlist resources:
                                  > http://www.bohemica.com/czechtranslation
                                  >
                                  > Obcasnik:
                                  > http://zehrovak.bloguje.cz
                                  > Yahoo! Groups Links
                                  >
                                  >
                                  >
                                  >
                                  >
                                • raesim
                                  ... Crunching is fine as an expressive description, but it s not AFAIK the standard term here. If repeated throughout the text, it would draw too much
                                  Message 16 of 20 , Oct 1, 2004
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                                    > > Thanks, didn't think of crunching

                                    'Crunching' is fine as an expressive description, but it's not AFAIK
                                    the standard term here. If repeated throughout the text, it would
                                    draw too much attention to itself.

                                    > Here you can only crunch things that are crunchy. You can crunch
                                    > potato chips, or crunch roasted chick peas sprinkled with chili
                                    > powder, as I did yesterday (a terrific Mexican snack from the gas
                                    > station). But for hard candy, we'd say bite.

                                    I find 'bite' odd, too. As Jamie said himself, it refers to a
                                    single action.

                                    As far as I'm concerned, the only distinction is between sucking and
                                    chewing.

                                    Simon
                                  • Terminus Technicus
                                    ... Thanks for another view on the matter... fair enough, but what about hard things (sweets/candy) - like Halls - when somebody stops cucat them and
                                    Message 17 of 20 , Oct 1, 2004
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                                      > As far as I'm concerned, the only distinction is between sucking and
                                      > chewing.

                                      Thanks for another view on the matter... fair enough, but what about hard
                                      things (sweets/candy) - like Halls - when somebody stops "cucat" them and
                                      "rozkouse je" - that's hardly chewing, is it? Is crunch Ok here?

                                      M
                                    • raesim
                                      ... I think chew covers the whole masticatory spectrum. Simon
                                      Message 18 of 20 , Oct 2, 2004
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                                        > > As far as I'm concerned, the only distinction is between sucking
                                        > > and chewing.
                                        >
                                        > Thanks for another view on the matter... fair enough, but what
                                        > about hard things (sweets/candy) - like Halls - when somebody
                                        > stops "cucat" them and "rozkouse je" - that's hardly chewing, is
                                        > it? Is crunch Ok here?

                                        I think 'chew' covers the whole masticatory spectrum.

                                        Simon
                                      • James Kirchner
                                        ... Crunch is too slangy here for any type of business report. Besides, you can crunch something without it being in your mouth. You can crunch something up
                                        Message 19 of 20 , Oct 2, 2004
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                                          On Saturday, October 2, 2004, at 01:23 AM, Terminus Technicus wrote:

                                          >
                                          > > As far as I'm concerned, the only distinction is between sucking and
                                          > > chewing.
                                          >
                                          > Thanks for another view on the matter... fair enough, but what about
                                          > hard
                                          > things (sweets/candy) - like Halls - when somebody stops "cucat" them
                                          > and
                                          > "rozkouse je" - that's hardly chewing, is it? Is crunch Ok here?

                                          Crunch is too slangy here for any type of business report. Besides,
                                          you can crunch something without it being in your mouth. You can
                                          crunch something up with a hammer or something, conceivably at least.
                                          I think your only alternatives here are "bite" and "chew". In my
                                          opinion, "rozkouse je" (if it's got "roz-") would be "bite them", but
                                          something meaning "rozkouse a drti je" would be "chew them". "Crunch"
                                          would have the same sound as writing "zvejkat" instead of "zvykat".

                                          Jamie


                                          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                                        • ing.Sárka Rubková
                                          I believe that to crunch can be translated as chroupat nebo chr^oupat nebo i kr^oupat. sarka ... From: Terminus Technicus [mailto:czechlist@tertech.cz] Sent:
                                          Message 20 of 20 , Oct 2, 2004
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                                            I believe that to crunch can be translated as chroupat nebo chr^oupat nebo i
                                            kr^oupat.

                                            sarka

                                            -----Original Message-----
                                            From: Terminus Technicus [mailto:czechlist@...]
                                            Sent: Friday, October 01, 2004 12:56 PM
                                            To: Czechlist@yahoogroups.com
                                            Subject: Re: [Czechlist] Re: kousat, rozkousat a sweet??




                                            > If the kids are eating sweets noisily: 'Don't crunch! Oooh, it goes right
                                            through me!' How would you say that in Czech?

                                            Say what - don't crunch'em? Nekousejte je- do nich, nerozkousavejte je

                                            technically crunch is drtit, but you don't "drti" sweets with your teeth...
                                            you could "drtit" them in a hmozdir, though, or with a heavy object, for
                                            some weird purpose...

                                            Thanks, didn't think of crunching

                                            Matej






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