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TERM:coach-bus

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  • Hana Viansová
    Hi all, could someone please clarify the diffence between the two? I´ve read very inconsistent explanations even in original sources. I imagine it´s a
    Message 1 of 6 , Sep 5, 2004
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      Hi all,
      could someone please clarify the diffence between the two? I�ve read very inconsistent explanations even in original sources. I imagine it�s a British thing (never heard it in the US).
      And another thing - one of my students says that his American friends correct his pronunciation of the word TINY. He pronounces it TAI (as in why) while they say it should be TIIINI. As far as I can recall, I�ve always heard people say it the first way. Is either way possible? Is it perhaps a local thing somewere?
      TIA
      Hanka

      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • James Kirchner
      ... From what I ve been able to figure out, those long-distance tourist buses that the British call coaches are normally called buses in the US. Sometimes in
      Message 2 of 6 , Sep 5, 2004
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        On Sunday, September 5, 2004, at 03:52 PM, Hana Viansová wrote:

        > could someone please clarify the diffence between the two? I´ve read
        > very inconsistent explanations even in original sources. I imagine
        > it´s a British thing (never heard it in the US).

        From what I've been able to figure out, those long-distance tourist
        buses that the British call coaches are normally called buses in the
        US. Sometimes in the US, when someone wants to sound classy, they call
        them "motor coaches". But just saying one is traveling by coach would
        make Americans think one is taking an old-fashioned horse-drawn
        vehicle. So, if you're working on something that has to be
        comprehended by Americans as well as UK residents, you can't use just
        "coach". I'd suggest "bus" or "motor coach", if the British don't
        object to those.

        > And another thing - one of my students says that his American friends
        > correct his pronunciation of the word TINY. He pronounces it TAI (as
        > in why) while they say it should be TIIINI. As far as I can recall,
        > I´ve always heard people say it the first way. Is either way possible?
        > Is it perhaps a local thing somewere?

        Either your student's American friends are playing with him, or the
        level of ignorance and illiteracy of American youth has reached
        proportions more staggering than I've ever imagined it could.

        "Tiny" and "teeny" are two different words. You student is pronouncing
        "tiny" correctly. It's [taini]. The word "teeny" is informal, is
        pronounced [ti:ni], and indicates that something is even smaller than
        tiny. I think this applies on both sides of the ocean. If the
        Americans are really serious, they are very, very ignorant.

        Last week an American community college student of mine in a remedial
        writing class (she went to inner city schools) wrote a paragraph titled
        "The Boldest Job I Ever Had". "Bold", as was explained to me by
        another student, nowadays means in her neighborhood "bad" or
        "terrible". When I told her the real meaning of "bold" was "brave" or
        "courageous", she was completely surprised and didn't quite trust what
        I was telling her. I'm not even sure she knew what "courageous" meant.

        Jamie
      • raesim
        ... Jamie s basically right when he says that the British use coach to mean a long-distance bus. A bus and a coach, though, aren t merely the same vehicle
        Message 3 of 6 , Sep 5, 2004
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          > On Sunday, September 5, 2004, at 03:52 PM, Hana Viansová wrote:
          >
          > > could someone please clarify the diffence between the two? I´ve
          > > read very inconsistent explanations even in original sources. I
          > > imagine it´s a British thing (never heard it in the US).

          Jamie's basically right when he says that the British use 'coach' to
          mean a long-distance bus. A bus and a coach, though, aren't merely
          the same vehicle employed for different purposes: a coach
          is 'classier' -- it's higher off the ground (though not usually a
          double-decker), since it needs room for storing luggage under the
          seats, it's more comfortable, and it's usually sleeker. You have
          the distinction in the Czech Republic, even if you don't make it in
          the Czech language: compare the monsters that stop on Resslova in
          Prague to drop tourists off for U Fleku with the more modestly
          proportioned creatures that leave Karlovo namesti for Strahov and
          elsewhere in the city. This example calls to mind another possible
          distinction between coaches and buses, namely that the former are
          often chartered, the latter normally scheduled. But this isn't a
          necessary distinction: scheduled services from London to other big
          cities in the UK will use coaches; and chartered buses not coaches
          take children to school.

          BTW, in English we use a slash not a hyphen to separate
          alternatives. So, in your example: 'coach/bus'. This isn't just
          academic: for a moment you had me thinking you wanted help
          understanding what some hybrid called a 'coach-bus' was.

          Simon
        • James Kirchner
          ... Right. Which is what leads some American companies to call their vehicles motor coaches , rather than chartered buses. ... Right. The Slovak firm SAD
          Message 4 of 6 , Sep 5, 2004
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            On Sunday, September 5, 2004, at 06:44 PM, raesim wrote:

            > A bus and a coach, though, aren't merely
            > the same vehicle employed for different purposes: a coach
            > is 'classier' -- it's higher off the ground (though not usually a
            > double-decker), since it needs room for storing luggage under the
            > seats, it's more comfortable, and it's usually sleeker. 

            Right. Which is what leads some American companies to call their
            vehicles "motor coaches", rather than chartered buses.

            > You have the distinction in the Czech Republic, even if you don't make
            > it in
            > the Czech language: compare the monsters that stop on Resslova in
            > Prague to drop tourists off for U Fleku

            Right. The Slovak firm SAD Tourist has coaches. Commuters ride buses.

            > This example calls to mind another possible
            > distinction between coaches and buses, namely that the former are
            > often chartered, the latter normally scheduled.  But this isn't a
            > necessary distinction: scheduled services from London to other big
            > cities in the UK will use coaches; and chartered buses not coaches
            > take children to school.

            Right. The buses that take kids on field trips are chartered buses.
            Definitely not coaches.

            > BTW, in English we use a slash not a hyphen to separate
            > alternatives.  So, in your example: 'coach/bus'.  This isn't just
            > academic: for a moment you had me thinking you wanted help
            > understanding what some hybrid called a 'coach-bus' was.

            I have some students from other countries that signed up for courses
            under the designation in the school catalogue "chef/cook", so they tell
            me they plan to be "shef-kook".

            Jamie


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          • raesim
            ... Yes, I was going to use the example of field trips, but then it occurred to me that the buses that take children to school are actually chartered too. At
            Message 5 of 6 , Sep 6, 2004
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              --- In Czechlist@yahoogroups.com, James Kirchner <jpklists@s...>
              wrote:
              >
              > On Sunday, September 5, 2004, at 06:44 PM, raesim wrote:
              >
              > > and chartered buses not coaches
              > > take children to school.
              >
              > Right. The buses that take kids on field trips are chartered
              > buses. Definitely not coaches.

              Yes, I was going to use the example of field trips, but then it
              occurred to me that the buses that take children to school are
              actually chartered too. At least in the UK -- in the States, I
              assume, they're publicly owned (or they wouldn't all be painted
              yellow).

              Simon
            • James Kirchner
              ... Sometimes they re owned by the local school system, and sometimes they re owned by a transportation company that the school system contracts with. They
              Message 6 of 6 , Sep 6, 2004
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                On Monday, September 6, 2004, at 05:22 AM, raesim wrote:

                > --- In Czechlist@yahoogroups.com, James Kirchner <jpklists@s...>
                > wrote:
                > >
                > > On Sunday, September 5, 2004, at 06:44 PM, raesim wrote:
                > >
                > > > and chartered buses not coaches
                > > > take children to school.
                > >
                > > Right.  The buses that take kids on field trips are chartered
                > > buses.  Definitely not coaches.
                >
                > Yes, I was going to use the example of field trips, but then it
                > occurred to me that the buses that take children to school are
                > actually chartered too.  At least in the UK -- in the States, I
                > assume, they're publicly owned (or they wouldn't all be painted
                > yellow).

                Sometimes they're owned by the local school system, and sometimes
                they're owned by a transportation company that the school system
                contracts with. They are less comfortable than even municipal buses
                are. You have never felt a rougher suspension than on one of those
                yellow school buses.

                Jamie


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