Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

Re: [Czechlist] SKODOLIBY...was: SYMPATICKY

Expand Messages
  • Jirka Bolech
    Hi Jamie, as regards skodolibi , the form actually exists. It s the adjective s third person plural in nominative. The adjective could be used as a noun, but
    Message 1 of 23 , Aug 26, 2004
    • 0 Attachment
      Hi Jamie,

      as regards "skodolibi", the form actually exists. It's the adjective's third
      person plural in nominative. The adjective could be used as a noun, but it's
      not a standard usage with this one...

      Jirka Bolech
    • James Kirchner
      ... Right. I knew that, but thought there was a noun with the same form. ... Thanks. And you guys do need a noun for that emotion. ;-) Jamie [Non-text
      Message 2 of 23 , Aug 26, 2004
      • 0 Attachment
        On Thursday, August 26, 2004, at 04:43 PM, Jirka Bolech wrote:

        > as regards "skodolibi", the form actually exists. It's the adjective's
        > third
        > person plural in nominative.

        Right. I knew that, but thought there was a noun with the same form.

        > The adjective could be used as a noun, but it's
        > not a standard usage with this one...

        Thanks.

        And you guys do need a noun for that emotion. ;-)

        Jamie


        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      • melvyn.geo
        ... is ... be ... When this subject last cropped up on this list some time ago I quoted the Collins Cobuild definition of gleeful : Someone who is gleeful is
        Message 3 of 23 , Aug 27, 2004
        • 0 Attachment
          > From: "James Kirchner" <jpklists@s...>

          > > - gleeful
          >
          > It would be hard to say that someone gleeful at his birthday party
          is
          > skodaliby. Gleeful means very, very joyful. There doesn't have to
          be
          > any skodalibi, and there usually isn't.
          >

          When this subject last cropped up on this list some time ago I quoted
          the Collins Cobuild definition of 'gleeful':

          Someone who is gleeful is full of joy and excitement, often because
          of someone else's foolishness or failure.

          I seem to remember that this emphasis on the negative aspect of the
          word came as a surprise to some American list-members but I would say
          it is quite standard in British English and when I think about it, I
          have probably hardly ever come across the happy dancing Snoopy aspect
          of the word used in absolute earnest since my primary-school days.

          Collins Cobuild gives a couple of nice examples of 'glee':

          the glee with which the media report scientific calamities

          and

          He smiles with a hint of glee.

          Do you think the latter sentence is likely to have anything but a
          sinister meaning ("Now you are in my power, Penelope Pitstop!!")? I'd say this use of 'glee' produces a fine chilling 'eeeee' effect, which you are perhaps subconsciously attempting to reproduce with your 'skodolibi'.


          --- In Czechlist@yahoogroups.com, Petr Veselý <veselypetr@p...> wrote:

          >
          > Slightly off-topic here. Just wonder who will be the first
          adventurous
          > lexicographer who will change the current standard in bilingual
          > dictionaries, i.e. CZ noun - EN noun, CZ adjective - EN adjective,
          to sth.
          > like "Czechs have a word for it" - EN clause and vice versa.

          The old Poldauf dictionary is sometimes quite good at
          suggesting 'things we would say in the same situation', which bear
          little logical or lexical relation to the original word or phrase. I
          shall try to hunt down some examples down when I get a moment.

          M.
        • ing.Sarka Rubkova
          Of course, we have: skodolibost Sarka ... From: James Kirchner [mailto:jpklists@sbcglobal.net] Sent: Friday, August 27, 2004 3:36 AM To:
          Message 4 of 23 , Aug 29, 2004
          • 0 Attachment
            Of course, we have: skodolibost

            Sarka

            -----Original Message-----
            From: James Kirchner [mailto:jpklists@...]
            Sent: Friday, August 27, 2004 3:36 AM
            To: Czechlist@yahoogroups.com
            Subject: Re: [Czechlist] SKODOLIBY...was: SYMPATICKY




            On Thursday, August 26, 2004, at 04:43 PM, Jirka Bolech wrote:

            > as regards "skodolibi", the form actually exists. It's the adjective's
            > third
            > person plural in nominative.

            Right. I knew that, but thought there was a noun with the same form.

            > The adjective could be used as a noun, but it's
            > not a standard usage with this one...

            Thanks.

            And you guys do need a noun for that emotion. ;-)

            Jamie


            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]




            Czechlist resources:
            http://www.bohemica.com/czechtranslation

            Obcasnik:
            http://zehrovak.bloguje.cz
            Yahoo! Groups Links
          Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.