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THANKs - TERM: layout-free design

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  • Jirka Bolech
    Hi Simon, bliged for your input. What confuses me though is some references on the Web to being able to position layout-free design products, even with
    Message 1 of 5 , Aug 4, 2004
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      Hi Simon,

      'bliged for your input. What confuses me though is some references on the
      Web to being able to position 'layout-free design' products, even with
      screens, such as monitors, either horizontally or vertically. I don't really
      think this is what you would do with such a TV set, is it? I can imagine
      placing them on the ceiling, like in one TV commercial, but not really on
      their sides. I mean, you can do that, but the picture will be shown in the
      same way, so 'layout-free design' should only mean it's the box that allows
      different positions within an interior as opposed to any electronic
      functions; that's what I wanted to get confirmed. I guess the extract you
      have quoted does confirm it.

      I'm just finalizing the text, about to send it off soon. I've used
      "libovolne umisteni" in a grammatically rephrased sentence and I suppose it
      will do.

      Jirka Bolech
    • raesim
      ... I took horizontal to mean flat (not widthways ) and vertical to mean upright (not lengthways ). Simon
      Message 2 of 5 , Aug 4, 2004
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        --- In Czechlist@yahoogroups.com, "Jirka Bolech" <jirka.bolech@s...>
        wrote:
        >
        > What confuses me though is some references on the Web to being
        > able to position 'layout-free design' products, even with
        > screens, such as monitors, either horizontally or vertically. I
        > don't really think this is what you would do with such a TV set,
        > is it? I can imagine placing them on the ceiling, like in one TV
        > commercial, but not really on their sides. I mean, you can do
        > that, but the picture will be shown in the same way, ...

        I took 'horizontal' to mean 'flat' (not 'widthways') and 'vertical'
        to mean 'upright' (not 'lengthways').

        Simon
      • Tertech
        Don t know about tellies, but there are computer screens (used for layout design = ZLOM mostly) that you can slide on a circular base to change from landscape
        Message 3 of 5 , Aug 4, 2004
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          Don't know about tellies, but there are computer screens (used for layout
          design = ZLOM mostly) that you can slide on a circular base to change from
          landscape to potrait position AND the image follows.... so when you're
          designing a double-page spread, you have the monitor in the conventional
          position, and when you're working on a sngle page design, you "turn" it "on
          its side" to give you more space without scrolling...

          I guess something similar could happen with a TV, alth' I don't see much use
          for it....

          Matej



          ----- Original Message -----
          From: "Jirka Bolech" <jirka.bolech@...>
          To: <Czechlist@yahoogroups.com>
          Sent: Wednesday, August 04, 2004 5:58 PM
          Subject: [Czechlist] THANKs - TERM: layout-free design


          > Hi Simon,
          >
          > 'bliged for your input. What confuses me though is some references on the
          > Web to being able to position 'layout-free design' products, even with
          > screens, such as monitors, either horizontally or vertically. I don't
          really
          > think this is what you would do with such a TV set, is it? I can imagine
          > placing them on the ceiling, like in one TV commercial, but not really on
          > their sides. I mean, you can do that, but the picture will be shown in the
          > same way, so 'layout-free design' should only mean it's the box that
          allows
          > different positions within an interior as opposed to any electronic
          > functions; that's what I wanted to get confirmed. I guess the extract you
          > have quoted does confirm it.
          >
          > I'm just finalizing the text, about to send it off soon. I've used
          > "libovolne umisteni" in a grammatically rephrased sentence and I suppose
          it
          > will do.
          >
          > Jirka Bolech
          >
          >
          >
          >
          > Czechlist resources:
          > http://www.bohemica.com/czechtranslation
          >
          > Obcasnik:
          > http://zehrovak.bloguje.cz
          > Yahoo! Groups Links
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
        • Jirka Bolech
          ... So did I -- after all the two words are for two-dimensional systems -- but that s the problem: what s the point in having a TV screen in upright position?
          Message 4 of 5 , Aug 4, 2004
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            > I took 'horizontal' to mean 'flat' (not 'widthways') and 'vertical'
            > to mean 'upright' (not 'lengthways').

            So did I -- after all the two words are for two-dimensional systems -- but
            that's the problem: what's the point in having a TV screen in upright
            position? Only perhaps looking at it as you do at ASCII smileys ;-) I'm
            still rather witless as to what other than 'normal' positions a TV set may
            take to call its design layout-free. Perhaps really on the ceiling. Anyway,
            I've submited the translation to my client...

            Jirka Bolech
          • raesim
            ... You ve misunderstood me. By upright I meant the normal position for a TV screen, i.e. standing, as opposed to flat. ... The options do seem rather
            Message 5 of 5 , Aug 4, 2004
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              > > I took 'horizontal' to mean 'flat' (not 'widthways')
              > > and 'vertical' to mean 'upright' (not 'lengthways').
              >
              > So did I -- after all the two words are for two-dimensional
              > systems -- but that's the problem: what's the point in having a TV
              > screen in upright position? Only perhaps looking at it as you do
              > at ASCII smileys ;-)

              You've misunderstood me. By 'upright' I meant the normal position
              for a TV screen, i.e. standing, as opposed to flat.

              > I'm still rather witless as to what other than 'normal' positions
              > a TV set may take to call its design layout-free. Perhaps really
              > on the ceiling.

              The options do seem rather limited.

              Simon
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