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Re: American slang

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  • ash bob
    believe it or not, groovy is a serious word. But it is not as widely used as the word cool . I have a question for anyone who can answer... is there some
    Message 1 of 2 , Jun 1, 2004
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      believe it or not, groovy is a "serious" word. But it is not as widely used as the word "cool". I have a question for anyone who can answer... is there some trick to memorizing where the apostrophes and haceks go? (sry i dont have a accent mark on my keyboard)


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    • James Kirchner
      ... In the 1960s, I understand groovy was also a serious word, but I didn t know that until I got to grad school and a professor from Boston told me. I grew
      Message 2 of 2 , Jun 1, 2004
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        On Tuesday, June 1, 2004, at 01:57 PM, ash bob wrote:

        > believe it or not, groovy is a "serious" word.

        In the 1960s, I understand "groovy" was also a serious word, but I
        didn't know that until I got to grad school and a professor from Boston
        told me. I grew up in Detroit, and "groovy" was only heard on TV and
        the radio, so if you used it here, you sounded like a dork who got his
        idea of what was cool from the media and advertisements. Nobody wanted
        to be that, so nobody said "groovy" unless they were sarcastically
        imitating people on TV.

        > But it is not as widely used as the word "cool". I have a question for
        > anyone who can answer... is there some trick to memorizing where the
        > apostrophes and haceks go? (sry i dont have a accent mark on my
        > keyboard)

        If you have a PC or a Mac, you can get those apostrophes. And if you
        have a Mac, you don't have to memorize 100 cryptic digits to type on
        your number pad.

        The only rule I can give you is only partial. That's that all those
        prefixes like "vy-" and "na-" take accents on nouns, but not on verbs
        or other types of words.

        The best way to learn where they go is to learn to pronounce well. And
        sometimes not even that works.

        Jamie


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