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Re: Policeman

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  • jsyeaton
    About Troy - be warned: no gods. About Czech-speaking Black Americans: so this was where Skvoretsky got his, for Nevesta z Texasu? BTW - does anybody know if
    Message 1 of 23 , May 31 12:47 PM
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      About Troy - be warned: no gods.

      About Czech-speaking Black Americans: so this was where Skvoretsky got
      his, for Nevesta z Texasu? BTW - does anybody know if that was
      intended to be a comedy? There are obviously intentionally comic
      scenes involving former members of the Austro-Hungarian Empire and
      their decision to join the Union Army, but I couldn't tell if the
      business about the Americans was intended to be funny or not. For
      example, the slave girl who addresses her Czech lover as "White Boy,"
      ghetto speech 100 years too early. Unmarried young women of reasonably
      good families casually making dates with men they've just been
      introduced to on the street. (Well, probably the sidewalk.) The
      whole business about General Burnside was unbearably tedious, so that
      was probably not intended to be humorous, but I skipped most of it and
      so can't offer any examples.

      Judy


      --- In Czechlist@yahoogroups.com, Michael Grant <trans@b...> wrote:
      > On May 31, 2004, at 1:27 PM, James Kirchner wrote:
      >
      > > No, he's not real. I was just kidding. He's a character in a
      > > Czech-American folktale that's also told by some people in the CR.
      See
      > > other posting.
      >
      > Is that black weatherman on TV Nova still around?
      > Michael
      >
      > --
      > "Open the pod bay doors, Hal."
      > "I'm sorry, Dave. I'm afraid I can't do that."
      --- In Czechlist@yahoogroups.com, James Kirchner <jpklists@s...>
      wrote:
      >
      > On Monday, May 31, 2004, at 02:13 PM, kzgafas wrote:
      >
      > > --- In Czechlist@yahoogroups.com, Michael Grant <trans@b...>
      wrote:
      > > > On May 31, 2004, at 12:35 PM, James Kirchner wrote:
      > > >
      > > > > I have met the Czech-speaking African-American policeman who
      > > pulled
      > > > > over the Czech couple driving through Chicago, Florida,
      > > California,
      > > > > Nevada...  Wow!  That guy is everywhere!
      > >
      > > He may have been an African who had studied at a university in the
      > > former CSSR, and later immigrated to the United States. I met
      people
      > > like these in the US.
      >
      > No, he's not real. I was just kidding. He's a character in a
      > Czech-American folktale that's also told by some people in the CR.
      See
      > other posting.
      >
      > Jamie
      >
      >
      > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • melvyn.geo
      ... What is Hantec exactly? ... I am quite puzzled too. Can you translate? copak oni ... That long o makes it sound like Czech with a Lancashire accent. ...
      Message 2 of 23 , May 31 3:36 PM
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        --- In Czechlist@yahoogroups.com, Petr Veselý <veselypetr@p...> wrote:

        > >
        > I believe that the majority of Moravians (and perhaps even the majority of
        > Brno dwellers themselves) would have problems with this sentence in Hantec.

        What is Hantec exactly?

        > a friend of mine visited one of the few surviving "hospoda ctvrte
        > cenove skupiny" pubs (the lands of the walking dead, pozn. prekl.:-)

        :-) We have one across the road from us. When they want to film one of those 1930s scenes where the kids can only get their dad out of the pub by setting fire to it, they send a film crew down to Delnicky dum.

        >in
        > Brno, and was quite puzzled when the waiter asked him "tak co to bude
        > mladej, pro'z^ek nebo des^t^ovku?"

        I am quite puzzled too. Can you translate?

        "copak oni
        > nevijó, ze dnes bylo k obedu zelé s knedló?" :-)

        That long o makes it sound like Czech with a Lancashire accent.

        >we have been
        > happily exploiting the poor Ukrainians,

        When I first heard the south Moravian accent I thought I was listening to Ukrainians.

        > In other words, you are warmly welcome and bring as many strong friends as you can :-)))

        Last time we had an invitation like that on this list, a dozen Czechlisters descended like a swarm of locusts on this poor guy in Valtice (see archive). However, it turned out that he owned a flower shop and he'd just happened to invite us on Mother's Day :-(, so we all had to work really hard in his shop for our wine-tasting session at a nearby wine cellar.

        Petr, I have not had the benefit of your linguistic erudition for my latest literary creation. My weblog has achieved cult status in Kamenne Zehrovice and my mailbox is flooded with rapturous acclaim:

        >Nechci Ti nejak lichotit, ale pripada mi jako velice dobra prace zkuseneho autora

        >Ten zaver je tak hezky

        >myslim si, ze Tvoje povidka by byla vybornou predlohou pro film. Byl by to trhak. :-) Kdybych byl filmovy magnat, hned bych si koupil filmova prava.

        >Nadhera, super - Vtipne, dojemne, hezky vypointovane.

        Do have a look at my latest story "Drak" when you get a moment and tell me how I can improve it linguistically, and I will willingly work as a serf in your vineyards.

        http://zehrovak.bloguje.cz

        Melvyn

        P.S. Michael G., you are a total hunk (see members file in Czechlist photos section: http://photos.groups.yahoo.com/group/Czechlist/lst )

        P.P.S. British English perceived as culturally superior?? The city centre here is swarming these days with chaps who waddle about wearing "Baz's Stag 2004" T-shirts, whose language seems to consist of monosyllabic grunts. Flights to and from Britain are so inexpensive nowadays that it is probably cheaper to hop on a plane to Prague and sup at the noisy pub with the English flag in the Old Town Square that Matej mentioned than it is to have a night out in London. I reckon most Praguers now view the proximity of Britain as a very mixed blessing.
      • jsyeaton
        ... majority of ... in Hantec. ... Ditto. ? ... centre here is swarming these days with chaps who waddle about wearing Baz s Stag 2004 T-shirts, whose
        Message 3 of 23 , May 31 5:08 PM
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          --- In Czechlist@yahoogroups.com, "melvyn.geo" <zehrovak@d...> wrote:
          > --- In Czechlist@yahoogroups.com, Petr Veselý <veselypetr@p...>
          wrote:
          >
          > > >
          > > I believe that the majority of Moravians (and perhaps even the
          majority of
          > > Brno dwellers themselves) would have problems with this sentence
          in Hantec.
          >
          > What is Hantec exactly?
          >
          Ditto. ?


          > P.P.S. British English perceived as culturally superior?? The city
          centre here is swarming these days with chaps who waddle about wearing
          "Baz's Stag 2004" T-shirts, whose language seems to consist of
          monosyllabic grunts. Flights to and from Britain are so inexpensive
          nowadays that it is probably cheaper to hop on a plane to Prague and
          sup at the noisy pub with the English flag in the Old Town Square that
          Matej mentioned than it is to have a night out in London. I reckon
          most Praguers now view the proximity of Britain as a very mixed
          blessing.

          There was a story in (prob.) LN a while back about the British lads
          who come down for a weekend of drinking and so on written by a Czech
          girl journalist who picked up a group of them at Charles Bridge. When
          they encountered some American girls they brushed them off with the
          comment "Americans are Klignons." Now, does this mean bellicose,
          domineering - all the things Czech holky aren't, or clinging vines,
          that you can't rid yourself of easily? Since the guys were more
          interested in the cheap beer than the (totally free) girls, no context
          developed that would resolve the ambiguity.

          Jude the Obscure (but only unintentionally)
        • James Kirchner
          ... The famous story of the man on the exploding toilet has been reported in newspapers all over the US and Europe. It happened in Pennsylvania, Wisconsin,
          Message 4 of 23 , May 31 5:23 PM
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            On Monday, May 31, 2004, at 03:42 PM, tomas_barendregt wrote:

            > --- In Czechlist@yahoogroups.com, James Kirchner <jpklists@s...>
            > wrote:
            > > No, he's not real.  I was just kidding.  He's a character in a
            > > Czech-American folktale that's also told by some people in the
            > CR.  See
            > > other posting.
            >
            > I beg to differ, Jamie. Interestingly enough, I read this story
            > back in early 1980's in a Czech magazine (Svet v obrazech? I
            > forgot...) - they had a page of travel stories mailed in by readers
            > and this was one of them. Since it was printed in the socialist
            > media, I know it is true!

            The famous story of the man on the exploding toilet has been reported
            in newspapers all over the US and Europe. It happened in Pennsylvania,
            Wisconsin, Germany, Sweden... You name the place it really happened
            there, and many Czechs KNOW it happened in Moravia, because they read
            it in the paper.

            Folktales are often printed in the media as fact.

            Jamie


            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          • James Kirchner
            ... It doesn t have to be. There are quite a few American-born native speakers of Polish in Detroit who are black. They picked it up in their neighborhood as
            Message 5 of 23 , May 31 5:26 PM
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              On Monday, May 31, 2004, at 03:47 PM, jsyeaton wrote:

              > About Troy - be warned: no gods.
              >
              > About Czech-speaking Black Americans: so this was where Skvoretsky got
              > his, for Nevesta z Texasu?

              It doesn't have to be. There are quite a few American-born native
              speakers of Polish in Detroit who are black. They picked it up in
              their neighborhood as little kids and had the language as a subject in
              school along with all the Polish-American kids. Something similar
              could have happened in Texas.

              Jamie


              [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
            • jsyeaton
              The book was set during the Civil War, when little Black children were not going to any kind of school in the South - or, probably, the North (I think it was
              Message 6 of 23 , May 31 5:48 PM
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                The book was set during the Civil War, when little Black children were
                not going to any kind of school in the South - or, probably, the North
                (I think it was in GA or someplace, but there are overlapping
                timelines and frames and I was never quite sure when and where I was
                supposed to be). I think the story was he had been adopted by an
                immigrant couple. Still, Lincoln's Slavic Rifles encountering a
                Czech-speaking Black in Georgia does seem a bit of coincidence - like
                your policeman. If the policeman is folklore, then maybe this was
                magic realism?

                Judy

                --- In Czechlist@yahoogroups.com, James Kirchner <jpklists@s...>
                wrote:
                >
                > On Monday, May 31, 2004, at 03:47 PM, jsyeaton wrote:
                >
                > > About Troy - be warned: no gods.
                > >
                > > About Czech-speaking Black Americans: so this was where Skvoretsky
                got
                > > his, for Nevesta z Texasu?
                >
                > It doesn't have to be. There are quite a few American-born native
                > speakers of Polish in Detroit who are black. They picked it up in
                > their neighborhood as little kids and had the language as a subject
                in
                > school along with all the Polish-American kids. Something similar
                > could have happened in Texas.
                >
                > Jamie
                >
                >
                > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
              • tomas_barendregt
                ... reported ... Pennsylvania, ... happened ... read ... I knew I should have added a smiley face... although I thought the combination of socialist media
                Message 7 of 23 , May 31 7:15 PM
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                  --- In Czechlist@yahoogroups.com, James Kirchner <jpklists@s...>
                  wrote:
                  > > Since it was printed in the socialist
                  > > media, I know it is true!
                  >
                  > The famous story of the man on the exploding toilet has been
                  reported
                  > in newspapers all over the US and Europe. It happened in
                  Pennsylvania,
                  > Wisconsin, Germany, Sweden... You name the place it really
                  happened
                  > there, and many Czechs KNOW it happened in Moravia, because they
                  read
                  > it in the paper.
                  >
                  > Folktales are often printed in the media as fact.

                  I knew I should have added a smiley face... although I thought the
                  combination of "socialist media" and "truth" in one sentence was a
                  dead giveaway.

                  I suppose the black Czech-speaking cop would be a good addition to a
                  Czech edition of urban legends. BTW, does anybody know about any
                  collection of Czech urban legends? I suppose many of them are rather
                  international, though.

                  Tom
                • James Kirchner
                  ... It was. I knew you were kidding. But a fun way to get someone s goat is to pretend you think his jokes are serious. ... How about the old circus bear who
                  Message 8 of 23 , May 31 7:34 PM
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                    On Monday, May 31, 2004, at 10:15 PM, tomas_barendregt wrote:

                    > I knew I should have added a smiley face... although I thought the
                    > combination of "socialist media" and "truth" in one sentence was a
                    > dead giveaway.

                    It was. I knew you were kidding. But a fun way to get someone's goat
                    is to pretend you think his jokes are serious.

                    > I suppose the black Czech-speaking cop would be a good addition to a
                    > Czech edition of urban legends. BTW, does anybody know about any
                    > collection of Czech urban legends? I suppose many of them are rather
                    > international, though.

                    How about the old circus bear who was put up in the Tatras for an
                    American diplomat to find on a hunting trip?

                    Jamie


                    [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                  • tomas_barendregt
                    ... The one who somewhere in the forest scared a babicka off her bike and then showed up in the hunter s sights biking? I heard that one in Estonia! Tom
                    Message 9 of 23 , May 31 8:00 PM
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                      --- In Czechlist@yahoogroups.com, James Kirchner <jpklists@s...>
                      wrote:
                      > How about the old circus bear who was put up in the Tatras for an
                      > American diplomat to find on a hunting trip?
                      >
                      The one who somewhere in the forest scared a babicka off her bike and
                      then showed up in the hunter's sights biking? I heard that one in
                      Estonia!

                      Tom
                    • James Kirchner
                      ... That s the one! :-) Jamie [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                      Message 10 of 23 , May 31 8:54 PM
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                        On Monday, May 31, 2004, at 11:00 PM, tomas_barendregt wrote:

                        > --- In Czechlist@yahoogroups.com, James Kirchner <jpklists@s...>
                        > wrote:
                        > > How about the old circus bear who was put up in the Tatras for an
                        > > American diplomat to find on a hunting trip?
                        >
                        > The one who somewhere in the forest scared a babicka off her bike and
                        > then showed up in the hunter's sights biking? I heard that one in
                        > Estonia!

                        That's the one! :-)

                        Jamie


                        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                      • Martin Janda
                        Have you heard the song by Jahelka, the singing lawyer ? Tatras are Bohemia, babicka is a mailman and bike becomes a motorbike (well, a moped). And the hunter
                        Message 11 of 23 , May 31 11:34 PM
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                          Have you heard the song by Jahelka, the 'singing lawyer'? Tatras are
                          Bohemia, babicka is a mailman and bike becomes a motorbike (well, a moped).
                          And the hunter paying hard cash is a German, of course.

                          The ending is the best part:
                          Z opustene kulovnice vysla nahle rana, odrazena nabojnice trefila Germana.
                          Byla z toho pekna mela pro nimrody z Brodu, republika utrpela devizovou
                          skodu.

                          M.

                          ----- Original Message -----
                          From: "tomas_barendregt" <barendregt@...>
                          To: <Czechlist@yahoogroups.com>
                          Sent: Tuesday, June 01, 2004 5:00 AM
                          Subject: [Czechlist] Re: Policeman


                          > --- In Czechlist@yahoogroups.com, James Kirchner <jpklists@s...>
                          > wrote:
                          > > How about the old circus bear who was put up in the Tatras for an
                          > > American diplomat to find on a hunting trip?
                          > >
                          > The one who somewhere in the forest scared a babicka off her bike and
                          > then showed up in the hunter's sights biking? I heard that one in
                          > Estonia!
                          >
                          > Tom
                          >
                          >
                          >
                          >
                          > Worth checking out:
                          > http://translationexchange.blogspot.com
                          > Yahoo! Groups Links
                          >
                          >
                          >
                          >
                          >
                          >
                          >
                        • Petr Veselý
                          Melvyn wrote: What is Hantec exactly? Londoners have their Cockney and Brn^a ci have their Hantec, i.e. an urban dialect spoken only in Brno. Half of its
                          Message 12 of 23 , May 31 11:49 PM
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                            Melvyn wrote:

                            What is Hantec exactly?

                            Londoners have their Cockney and "Brn^a'ci" have their Hantec, i.e. an urban
                            dialect spoken only in Brno. Half of its vocabs are from German, like in the
                            sentence you quoted (therefore I though that you must have heard about it),
                            though I doubt whether Germans would understand them these days.
                            Recently, another comprehensive dictionary of Hantec was published. At
                            present, there is a funny commercial for the Starobrno beer on TV, which
                            retells the Czech myth about Premysl Orac and the countess Libuse in Hantec,
                            Premysl being a tractor driver and Libuse being a waitress whose tap broke
                            down, but Premysl repairs it :-))).
                            I think that Hantec is now only a lingustic curiosity and it will soon
                            survive only in books and dictionaries.

                            > pro'z^ek = beer (probably derived from the process of drawing it into
                            glass)
                            nebo des^t^ovku?" = lemonade, fizzy drink
                            I am quite puzzled too. Can you translate?


                            Petr, I have not had the benefit of your linguistic erudition for my latest
                            literary creation. My weblog has achieved cult status in Kamenne Zehrovice
                            and my mailbox is flooded with rapturous acclaim:

                            Erudition would be the very last word I would use to describe my knowledge
                            of Czech, but sure, after having spent a whole month on a meaningless WHO's
                            report, which sucessfully filled up two hundred pages without actually
                            saying anything, I will gladly read anything that tells something.

                            >Nechci Ti nejak lichotit, ale pripada mi jako velice dobra prace zkuseneho
                            autora
                            >Ten zaver je tak hezky
                            >myslim si, ze Tvoje povidka by byla vybornou predlohou pro film. Byl by to
                            trhak. :-) Kdybych byl filmovy magnat, hned bych si koupil filmova prava.
                            >Nadhera, super - Vtipne, dojemne, hezky vypointovane.

                            Hmm, if I were the author myself, I would start to feel conceited, provided
                            that the comments are true and you didn't make them up yourself.

                            Do have a look at my latest story "Drak" when you get a moment and tell me
                            how I can improve it linguistically,

                            Perhaps even today. :-)))

                            and I will willingly work as a serf in your vineyards.

                            I will remember this promise very, very carefully. :-)))

                            Petr
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