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Re: [Czechlist] TERMS: absencni a prezencni vypujcky

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  • James Kirchner
    ... This sounds good. Libraries here also have what are called inter-library loans, which involve transferring books among municipalities so that patrons can
    Message 1 of 10 , Dec 31, 1969
      On Monday, May 17, 2004, at 04:01 PM, Petr Veselý wrote:

      > My immediate idea are "off-site" versus "on-site" borrowings
      > Sometimes it works :-)))

      This sounds good. Libraries here also have what are called
      inter-library loans, which involve transferring books among
      municipalities so that patrons can borrow books that their libraries
      don't own.

      Jamie


      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • melvyn.geo
      ... Not such a bad idea, Petr. Alternatively, Simon, you could check out the Czechlist parallel translations section at http://www.bohemica.com/czechparallel ,
      Message 2 of 10 , May 17, 2004
        --- In Czechlist@yahoogroups.com, Petr Veselý <veselypetr@p...> wrote:
        > My immediate idea are "off-site" versus "on-site" borrowings
        > Sometimes it works :-)))
        >

        Not such a bad idea, Petr. Alternatively, Simon, you could check out the Czechlist parallel translations section at http://www.bohemica.com/czechparallel , where I wrestled with absencni vypujcky and related problems in Translation 4. If you go down to Footnote 4 you will find a link to the Slovnik knihovnicke terminologie at the National Library - the standard is pretty good and I am reliably informed that the contributors know their onions both in Czech and English, though the link itself is na baterky. There you will find 'outside loans' and 'loans for reference only' (or 'loans for in-house use').

        You might also like to have a look at some of the other stuff in the parallel translations section. I have now even included a special feature that tells you what the current temperature is in Prague, so you have no need to go out to find out.

        Regards,

        M.
      • tomas_barendregt
        ... Alternatively, Simon, you could check out the Czechlist parallel translations section at http://www.bohemica.com/czechparallel , where I wrestled with
        Message 3 of 10 , May 18, 2004
          --- In Czechlist@yahoogroups.com, "melvyn.geo" <zehrovak@d...> wrote:

          Alternatively, Simon, you could check out the Czechlist parallel
          translations section at http://www.bohemica.com/czechparallel , where
          I wrestled with absencni vypujcky and related problems in Translation
          4.

          Hello Melvyn,

          I checked out the above parallel translation and it struck me that
          you could also simply use the phrase "check out books/documents" to
          describe "absencni vypujcky". This is at least the usage in US
          libraries where the rules tell you how many tomes you can "check out".

          Have you entertained the thought? If so, is there a reason you
          decided against it?

          Tom
        • raesim
          Who da man? [Is this expression completely démodé in the States now?] ... section at http://www.bohemica.com/czechparallel , where I wrestled with absencni
          Message 4 of 10 , May 18, 2004
            Who da man? [Is this expression completely démodé in the States now?]

            > ...Simon, you could check out the Czechlist parallel translations
            section at http://www.bohemica.com/czechparallel , where I wrestled
            with absencni vypujcky and related problems in Translation 4. If you
            go down to Footnote 4 you will find a link to the Slovnik
            knihovnicke terminologie at the National Library - the standard is
            pretty good and I am reliably informed that the contributors know
            their onions both in Czech and English, though the link itself is na
            baterky. There you will find 'outside loans' and 'loans for
            reference only' (or 'loans for in-house use').

            That's very helpful. Thanks! I just have one reservation about the
            solutions to 'prezencni vypujcka': how can a book that musn't leave
            the library be 'loaned' or 'borrowed'? I got round the problem with
            a little 'translator intervention' (as I think you put it): 'outside
            loans and the provision of reference materials for in-house use'.

            Simon

            PS Thanks also to da udder men: Petr and Jamie.
          • melvyn.geo
            ... Don t think I have. It s definitely worth a footnote link, but how would you unambiguously use the phrase in that particular context? M.
            Message 5 of 10 , May 18, 2004
              --- In Czechlist@yahoogroups.com, "tomas_barendregt" <barendregt@e...> wrote:

              >> you could check out the Czechlist parallel
              >> translations section
              >
              > I checked out the above parallel translation and it struck me that
              > you could also simply use the phrase "check out books/documents" to
              > describe "absencni vypujcky".

              > Have you entertained the thought?

              Don't think I have. It's definitely worth a footnote link, but how would you unambiguously use the phrase in that particular context?

              M.
            • tomas_barendregt
              ... would you unambiguously use the phrase in that particular context? ... Do you refer to the possible ambiguity of check out = take away from the premises
              Message 6 of 10 , May 19, 2004
                --- In Czechlist@yahoogroups.com, "melvyn.geo" <zehrovak@d...> wrote:
                > Don't think I have. It's definitely worth a footnote link, but how
                would you unambiguously use the phrase in that particular context?
                >
                Do you refer to the possible ambiguity of check out = take away from
                the premises vs. check out = take a look at? I guess that might make
                it not super clear but given the context, I think it would be easy
                to realize the former applies.

                T.
              • James Kirchner
                ... The expression check out , meaning to take a look at, is pretty slangy, so it would not appear in formal text on libraries, and there would be no question
                Message 7 of 10 , May 19, 2004
                  On Wednesday, May 19, 2004, at 10:54 AM, tomas_barendregt wrote:

                  > --- In Czechlist@yahoogroups.com, "melvyn.geo" <zehrovak@d...> wrote:
                  > > Don't think I have. It's definitely worth a footnote link, but how
                  > would you unambiguously use the phrase in that particular context?
                  > >
                  > Do you refer to the possible ambiguity of check out = take away from
                  > the premises vs. check out = take a look at? I guess that might make
                  > it not super clear but given the context, I think it would be easy
                  > to  realize the former applies.

                  The expression "check out", meaning to take a look at, is pretty
                  slangy, so it would not appear in formal text on libraries, and there
                  would be no question that "check out" (especially since it often comes
                  along with the preposition "from") means to take books out of the
                  library officially. It would not be "super not clear", but absolutely,
                  completely clear.

                  Jamie


                  [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                • melvyn.geo
                  ... there ... comes ... absolutely, ... In this context it is not books that are being checked out but documents in the most general sense of the word used
                  Message 8 of 10 , May 20, 2004
                    --- In Czechlist@yahoogroups.com, James Kirchner <jpklists@s...>
                    wrote:

                    >
                    > The expression "check out", meaning to take a look at, is pretty
                    > slangy, so it would not appear in formal text on libraries, and
                    there
                    > would be no question that "check out" (especially since it often
                    comes
                    > along with the preposition "from") means to take books out of the
                    > library officially. It would not be "super not clear", but
                    absolutely,
                    > completely clear.
                    >
                    In this context it is not books that are being checked out
                    but 'documents' in the most general sense of the word used in this
                    field. 'From' is not used. 'Check out' is slangy in some contexts,
                    but elsewhere (with the meaning of 'examine', 'briefly consult') it
                    is barely even informal ('I'll just check out your medical records
                    before I examine you') and so would not particularly stand out in a
                    text in neutral style. As I say, the idea is worth a link but it
                    might not always work.

                    M.
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