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CHAT Inuit language test

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  • Beata Rodlingova
    Well, it looks like you Czechlisters are taking a break from serious work, so I have decided to throw in my Inuit share. The following are my notes from an
    Message 1 of 14 , Jan 26, 2004
      Well,
      it looks like you Czechlisters are taking a break from serious work,
      so I have decided to throw in my Inuit share.
      The following are my notes from an Inuit language course I took ages
      ago. The correct answers will be announced tomorrow after 6 pm Prague
      Central Time. It is all West Greenlandic for those who care about
      petty details. :)

      As we know, Inuit languages are polysynthetic, following are the
      meanings of some of the morphemes:

      atua = to read
      oqalu = to speak to a large audience
      saq/gaq (alophorms) = something with which the preceeding is done
      fik = a place where the preceeding is done

      For example, the largest book publisher in Nuuk is called Atuakkiorfik
      - A place where books are made/published (verb my wild guess).

      The words to translate:

      1.atuarfik
      2.atuagaq
      3.oqaluffik

      Pro uspesne resitele cena v podobe nekolika uzitecnych vyrazu v
      zapadni gronstine.

      Hodne stesti!
      Beata
      aka The Great Lurker (Velky S^mi'ra'k)
    • Petr Veselý
      Hi Beato, I ll try ... Petr
      Message 2 of 14 , Jan 26, 2004
        Hi Beato,

        I'll try
        >
        > 1.atuarfik = library ?
        > 2.atuagaq = eyes ?
        > 3.oqaluffik = church ?

        Petr
      • JPKIRCHNER@aol.com
        Okay. I ll try. ... How about some Hungarian slang? borotva = something to do with shaving kozos = apparatus So what is this? borotvakozostelefon Jamie
        Message 3 of 14 , Jan 26, 2004
          Okay. I'll try.

          In a message dated 1/26/04 4:00:08 PM, beatarodlingova@... writes:

          > 1.atuarfik - library?
          >
          > 2.atuagaq - book?
          >
          > 3.oqaluffik - a lectern? a microphone?
          >
          How about some Hungarian slang?

          borotva = something to do with shaving
          kozos = apparatus

          So what is this?

          borotvakozostelefon

          Jamie





          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        • Petr Veselý
          ... a cell phone ??? And what about a Slovak-like word? drevokocu r (a specific animal living in the woods) drevo = wood kocu r = tomcat Unfortunately, it just
          Message 4 of 14 , Jan 26, 2004
            >
            > borotva = something to do with shaving
            > kozos = apparatus
            >
            > So what is this?
            >
            > borotvakozostelefon
            >
            a cell phone ???

            And what about a Slovak-like word?

            drevokocu'r (a specific animal living in the woods)

            drevo = wood
            kocu'r = tomcat

            Unfortunately, it just resembles Slovak, it is an artificial word and it
            functions as a joke only because it sounds funny to us.

            Petr
          • melvyn.geo
            ... Perhaps our previous 19,000+ messages have solved all possible Czech English translation problems, so now we ll just have to chat among ourselves... ... I
            Message 5 of 14 , Jan 26, 2004
              --- In Czechlist@yahoogroups.com, "Beata Rodlingova" <beatarodlingova@h...> wrote:
              > Well,
              > it looks like you Czechlisters are taking a break from serious work,

              Perhaps our previous 19,000+ messages have solved all possible Czech<>English translation problems, so now we'll just have to chat among ourselves...


              > The words to translate:
              >
              > 1.atuarfik - school
              > 2.atuagaq - book
              > 3.oqaluffik - church

              I share Michael's curiosity about the pronunciation of 'q' - my guess is that it is similar to the way Liverpudlians pronounce the final sound in 'wack' [something between a k and a ch, (an unvoiced aspirated guttural??)]
              >
              > Pro uspesne resitele cena v podobe nekolika uzitecnych vyrazu v
              > zapadni gronstine.
              >

              I would like to know how to say "It's a bit chilly out" in Western Greenlandic.

              > aka The Great Lurker (Velky S^mi'ra'k)

              =:-O

              M.
            • Martin Janda
              Not sure if Hungarians use shave for squeeze money out of somebody , but if they do, this must be the payphone! Or: a telecommuting barber :-))) Martin
              Message 6 of 14 , Jan 26, 2004
                Not sure if Hungarians use 'shave' for 'squeeze money out of somebody', but
                if they do, this must be the payphone!

                Or: a telecommuting barber :-)))

                Martin

                > >
                > How about some Hungarian slang?
                >
                > borotva = something to do with shaving
                > kozos = apparatus
                >
                > So what is this?
                >
                > borotvakozostelefon
                >
                > Jamie
                >
              • JPKIRCHNER@aol.com
                ... Specifically the type of cell phone from the late 90s that was square and shaped like a shaver. Jamie [Non-text portions of this message have been
                Message 7 of 14 , Jan 26, 2004
                  In a message dated 1/26/04 6:28:19 PM, veselypetr@... writes:

                  > > borotvakozostelefon
                  > >
                  > a cell phone ???
                  >
                  Specifically the type of cell phone from the late '90s that was square and
                  shaped like a shaver.

                  Jamie


                  [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                • Jan Culka
                  ... Honza
                  Message 8 of 14 , Jan 26, 2004
                    > 1.atuarfik - reading room
                    > 2.atuagaq - newspaper or magazine or book or glasses?
                    > 3.oqaluffik - auditorium, amphitheatre, meeting room (meeting igloo)

                    Honza
                  • Jan Culka
                    ... Is it a mobile phone? Honza
                    Message 9 of 14 , Jan 26, 2004
                      > borotva = something to do with shaving
                      > kozos = apparatus
                      >
                      > So what is this?
                      >
                      > borotvakozostelefon

                      Is it a mobile phone?
                      Honza
                    • Beata Rodlingova
                      To cheer you up on a frosty afternoon, Hungarian slang sorted, time for Inuit instruction lesson two. First of all, I must say your translations were
                      Message 10 of 14 , Jan 27, 2004
                        To cheer you up on a frosty afternoon, Hungarian slang sorted, time
                        for Inuit instruction lesson two.

                        First of all, I must say your translations were admiringly accurate
                        guesses. The winner is ... hip hip hurrah... Melvyn with three out of
                        three (is this linguistic or googlistic skills I wonder? :) Or perhaps
                        KZ are the last fort of the othewise disappeared Dorset culture?)

                        > 1.atuarfik - school (library being of course the logical literal
                        translation, alas that is "atuagaateqarfi" in Greenlandic.
                        > 2.atuagaq - book
                        > 3.oqaluffik - church

                        Cultural Awareness Award goes to Petr, who got the translation of
                        "church" right. Being the heathen I am I went for "assembly room"
                        first time I saw the word.

                        Linguistic Creativity Award goes to Honza for his "meeting igloo" -
                        socializing actully is a very popular pastime, Greenlanders at least
                        spend most of their time "going a'visitin'".

                        As for the promised Greenlandic parleur, I must disappoint Melvyn. "It
                        is a bit chilly" is impossible to translate, as "a bit" and "chilly"
                        are incompatible lexemes in Greenlandic for semantically
                        extra-linguistic reasons... :) (the truth is my communicative skills
                        in Greenlandic are poor to non-existent)

                        Also, I am not able to crack the pronunciation mystery, it has been
                        months since I last heard spoken Greenlandic. AFAIR it is a plain
                        voiceless velar stop (IPA's k). There are even orthographic systems
                        that use "k" instead of "q". And we must remember there are countless
                        varieties within the Eskimo-Aleut languages, pronunciation differences
                        of course stepping in first.

                        To make ammends, some useful vocabulary.

                        words coined:
                        - oqaasilerisoq = linguist
                        (not to be mistaken with oqaatserisoq = one who is hungry for gossip)
                        - oqarasuartaat = telephone, lit. means to say something quickly
                        - qivittoq = one who has deserted the society and left for the
                        mountains. Underlying meaning of = one who has had enough.
                        - angakkoq = shaman
                        - qarasaasiaq = computer, lit. something that was made so that it
                        would resemble a brain
                        - naalagarsuaq = Greenland's Prime Minister, lit. big boss
                        - naalagaaraq = (irritating) office clerk, lit. small boss

                        semantic shift:
                        - qitivippoq = originally chirps, prattles, now = speaks Danish
                        - agiaq = originally shaman's whetstone, now = violin

                        and a few loan words to finish with:
                        - kanngorooq = kangaroo
                        - pannakaaq = pancake
                        - tupa = tobacco, as in tupatorneq inerteqquataavoq = no smoking
                        - and of course telefoni, radiatori, vaajari = wire and the likes.

                        Cheers
                        Beata
                      • melvyn.geo
                        ... Jizliva odpoved -x : Pokud bys chtela timto vyrazem linguistic skills poukazat na schopnost vyvozovat spravne jazykove zavery na zaklade tvych
                        Message 11 of 14 , Jan 27, 2004
                          --- In Czechlist@yahoogroups.com, "Beata Rodlingova" <beatarodlingova@h...> wrote:

                          > First of all, I must say your translations were admiringly accurate
                          > guesses. The winner is ... hip hip hurrah... Melvyn with three out of three (is this linguistic or googlistic skills I wonder? :)

                          Jizliva odpoved >-x : Pokud bys chtela timto vyrazem 'linguistic skills' poukazat na schopnost vyvozovat spravne jazykove zavery na zaklade tvych instrukci, pripoustim, ze se v tomto ohledu musim stale ucit. >->

                          Or perhaps
                          > KZ are the last fort of the othewise disappeared Dorset culture?)

                          Certainly looks and feels that way.

                          >
                          > Linguistic Creativity Award goes to Honza for his "meeting igloo" -

                          The combined body heat of those inside such an igloo would surely make it structurally unsafe, or a bit damp anyway.

                          Anyway, many thanks for all that, Beata. Very edutaining and entercational. A real eye-opener. I am sure some superb and subtle poetry has been written in Western Greenlandic.

                          A mystery prize awaits the first person to translate this correctly:

                          Ekstere estas iomete malvarmete :-)

                          M.
                        • Jan Culka
                          By the way, has anyone any idea of Inuit pronunciation rules? I believe Beata has, at least. I made a great pleasure to my friend in Italy sending him 31 Inuit
                          Message 12 of 14 , Jan 28, 2004
                            By the way, has anyone any idea of Inuit pronunciation rules? I believe
                            Beata has, at least.
                            I made a great pleasure to my friend in Italy sending him 31 Inuit snow
                            terms as he knew only 25 before!

                            Honza


                            ----- Original Message -----
                            From: "Beata Rodlingova" <beatarodlingova@...>
                          • Beata Rodlingova
                            For anyone interested (and based in Prague) I can supply Greenlandic pop CDs offline. (Warning: very bad pop and I mean very bad pop) Beata
                            Message 13 of 14 , Jan 28, 2004
                              For anyone interested (and based in Prague) I can supply Greenlandic
                              pop CDs offline. (Warning: very bad pop and I mean very bad pop)
                              Beata
                            • melvyn.geo
                              ... Greenlandic ... Oh wow. A friend of mine based in London once cycled over here (only took him two weeks) to find some additions to his large vinyl
                              Message 14 of 14 , Jan 30, 2004
                                --- In Czechlist@yahoogroups.com, "Beata Rodlingova"
                                <beatarodlingova@h...> wrote:
                                > For anyone interested (and based in Prague) I can supply
                                Greenlandic
                                > pop CDs offline. (Warning: very bad pop and I mean very bad pop)


                                Oh wow. A friend of mine based in London once cycled over here (only
                                took him two weeks) to find some additions to his large vinyl
                                collection of Central and Eastern European Abba-soundalikes (very
                                chic and all the rage in his circles, he told me, and when I told a
                                Hungarian acquaintance from the Svepomoc list, who runs a small DVD
                                operation in Budapest, she pricked up her ears almost as much as
                                when I told her that sperm-whale song is the perfect accompaniment
                                to wrong-note piano music by Bela Bartok). He (my cyclist friend, not Bela
                                Bartok) then went over to Greenland to help build a skating-rink
                                there and he told me that their pop music subsequently went down
                                very well among his friends in London. What goes around comes around, I guess.

                                Congratulations on your native-like proficiency in Esperanto,
                                Beata. :-)

                                M.
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