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Re: [Czechlist] QUIZ "Why do Czechs start... RESULTS

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  • Jirka Bolech
    Hi, ... Still, does the same tradition of early morning starts apply to nowadays Austria or Hungary? I m tended to speculate that the Bolsheviks played their
    Message 1 of 7 , Jan 3, 2004
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      Hi,

      > The right answer to the question "Who was the guy that pushed through his
      > own biorhythm to the whole nation?" is:
      > our beloved monarch, Franz Joseph I (reigned 1848 - 1916), the Emperor of
      > the Austrian-Hungarian Monarchy.

      Still, does the same tradition of early morning starts apply to nowadays
      Austria or Hungary? I'm tended to speculate that the Bolsheviks played their
      role in keeping it, so it's probably similar in Hungary, but not so in
      Austria. I bet Helga has something to say about Austria's lifestyle.

      Jirka Bolech
    • Helga Humlova
      Of course, she has something to say..... :-)))) Austria is different. This is the first and most important thing you have to know. Before we joinded the EU
      Message 2 of 7 , Jan 4, 2004
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        Of course, she has something to say..... :-))))

        Austria is different. This is the first and most important thing you
        have to know. Before we joinded the EU (1995) Austrians saw their
        country as "the island of the blessedly" (die Insel der Seeligen) and
        around us were only kind of strange countries, doing everything wrong..

        I remember the time when I started to work (early 1980ths), offices
        usually started at about 7.30 or 8:00 at the very latest. Fridays we
        usually closed offices at 2 pm or so. Those days the blue color working
        class usually started work at around 5:30 to 6 am, many even earlier - 5
        am. My mom used to work in a newspaper/tobacco store at an underground
        station in Vienna. They opened each and everyday at 4:30 (just when the
        train service started in the morning).

        This has changed a lot since 1995. Only very few offices work before
        8:30 am nowadays. The "short Friday" has almost disappeared (probably
        because we do not have so many "chalupari") and as to my knowledge most
        factories (blue color workers) now start their shifts at around 7 am.
        This change was mainly a response to the different and "kind of weird"
        working hours in those horrible other countries. Fact is that at the
        beginning of this transition period one had only very limited chances to
        get the grocery shopping done or go to a public office. It took them far
        longer to realize that they need to change opening hours too. Austrian
        authorities (and trade/labor unions) rather accepted that people living
        in border areas (mainly German border) would shop in a different country
        than changing the old system of opening hours. It took them until the
        late 90ies to change that. The system still is not perfect, but it has
        improved.

        This is also true for state administration. About 20 years back state
        employees started work at 6:30 or 7:00 am and you wouldn't find any such
        office to be open for the public after 3 pm. Now they usually start at
        around 8 am and there are 2 "long" afternoons a week when all such
        offices are open for the public until 5:30 pm.
        Early start in state administration is a leftover from monarchy, which
        is documented in various laws, which are - even though not in actual use
        - still valid and enforceable.

        The change of working hours also influenced public transportation.
        Nowadays services start later in the morning (around 5 am) and end later
        at night (mostly around 1 am) and we now have night busses in Vienna
        (and I guess in some other bigger cities too).

        I could tell you lots of stories documenting the above said, but this
        would go too far. Only one thing: Even though Austria is part of the EU
        and so called modern world, TRADITION is still (and probably will remain
        for a long time) VERY IMPORTANT. And it is tradition, that anyone not
        getting up with the birds is kind of lazy and who is lazy is not a
        "good" human being.

        H.


        Still, does the same tradition of early morning starts apply to nowadays
        Austria or Hungary? I'm tended to speculate that the Bolsheviks played
        their
        role in keeping it, so it's probably similar in Hungary, but not so in
        Austria. I bet Helga has something to say about Austria's lifestyle.

        Jirka Bolech




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      • Jirka Bolech
        Hi Helga, so much information from ya! It means the Frantisek Prochazka cause must be true then, I suppose. It would still be interesting to compare this
        Message 3 of 7 , Jan 5, 2004
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          Hi Helga,

          so much information from ya! It means the "Frantisek Prochazka" cause must
          be true then, I suppose. It would still be interesting to compare this with
          some other countries.

          Jirka Bolech
        • JPKIRCHNER@aol.com
          ... In Welsh they don t have separate terms for green and blue, but just one to cover both of them (this is used as a famous example varying semantic fields in
          Message 4 of 7 , Jan 5, 2004
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            In a message dated 1/5/04 8:30:42 PM, trans@... writes:

            >I'm told that the word for 'black' in the racial sense in Irish
            >literally means blue.

            In Welsh they don't have separate terms for green and blue, but just one to
            cover both of them (this is used as a famous example varying semantic fields in
            most basic linguistics books). Some Australian languages have only a term
            for light colors and one for dark colors.

            Jamie
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