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Re: Holiday quiz (was: Ulysses S. Grant)

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  • melvyn.geo
    ... Oh, you are a card. ... I suppose you win brownie points for your creative and imaginative thinking but no shandy, I m afraid. The reason you will never
    Message 1 of 36 , Jan 1, 2004
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      --- In Czechlist@yahoogroups.com, Petr Veselý <veselypetr@p...> wrote:

      > I was just teasing you. :)))

      Oh, you are a card.

      >>There is a town in East Anglia called Diss but you will
      >>never be able to visit it. Why not?
      >
      > I suppose I have figured it out.

      > Once upon a time, <snip> lucky Petr, maybe, won a shandy

      I suppose you win brownie points for your creative and imaginative thinking but no shandy, I'm afraid. The reason you will never visit it is that AS YOU APPROACH IT DISS APPEARS.

      Did you enjoy your stay in Norfolk? Few problems with mad cow disease then?

      M.
    • Joe Janecka
      ... Many thanks Gabriela, That is a wonderful explanation. I agree that the old, polite versions sound so much better. I ve always liked to use the
      Message 36 of 36 , Jan 4, 2004
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        On Sat, 3 Jan 2004 10:40:34 +0100, you wrote:


        >Hubicka is an old word, and polite. Not used today, but still has definitely
        >nothing in common with todays huba!! :-)
        >Some word has changed over last 50-100 years, one of them is holka (girl),
        >today most widely used, but in the 20´ only the lower cast used it (it
        >propably comes from holá), but every proper guy had a devce. So it seems
        >like common speech of later decades is being accepted as polite and polite
        >speech is slowly forgotten.
        >For this reason, the way some immigrants speak today (in Romania etc.) may
        >seem a little fit funny, but in fact, it is very nice that they kept their
        >native language and very good for them, because many people tend to forget
        >and it is no easy to keep two languages alive. :-)
        >I used to have relatives in Chicago/Berwyn, and they spoke Czech at home
        >until schoolmates of their boy laughed at him that he didnt know how to say
        >zinka/washrag in English.
        >Gabriela

        Many thanks Gabriela,

        That is a wonderful explanation. I agree that the old, polite
        versions sound so much better. I've always liked to use the
        expression "dej mi hubicku" rather than "dej mi pusu". It just sounds
        much more intimate. I was quite taken aback when told that 'dej mi
        hubicku' meant "kiss my snout". Now I can go back to using the old
        phrase and feel good about it. Also devce instead of holka. Much more
        intimate sounding.

        I am so glad you set me straight.

        Na Shledanou,
        Josef
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