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Re: US Czechs

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  • melvyn.geo
    ... I hear you have a Bohemia Hill there too. There is one thing though, that put St. Louis ... a) the first Sokol society in the New World was formed in St.
    Message 1 of 7 , Jan 1, 2004
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      --- In Czechlist@yahoogroups.com, "Martina Silpoch" <mmsilpoch@e...> wrote:
      > Well, we are not as famous as Texas or Nebraska, all we have here
      > is Prague Ave, Danube Dr. and a dozen streets named few decades ago
      > after resident Czechs.

      I hear you have a Bohemia Hill there too.


      There is one thing though, that put St. Louis
      > ahead of other US cities as far as Czech history is concerned.
      > Should be a pretty easy one for you guys...

      a) the first Sokol society in the New World was formed in St. Louis in 1865.

      b) the great Josephine Baker*, who was born and brought up in St. Louis, visited Prague for some time in the 1930s. I was reading about it recently in the memoirs of Otakar Storch-Marien.

      M.

      * Famous for the following song inter alia - do you hear much French in your part of the world? I presume Leslie down in the swamp :-) there does...


      J'ai deux amours
      Mon pays et Paris
      Par eux toujours
      Mon coeur est ravi
      Ma savane est belle
      Mais a quoi bon le nier
      Ce qui m'ensorcelle
      C'est Paris, Paris tout entier
      Le voir un jour
      C'est mon reve joli
      J'ai deux amours
      Mon pays et Paris
    • Zemedelec@aol.com
      ... Actually I don t--as far as complete sentences or conversations are concerned. Quite a few Creole or Cajun words get somewhat anglicized then incorporated
      Message 2 of 7 , Jan 1, 2004
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        In a message dated 1/1/04 18:17:48, zehrovak@... writes:


        > do you hear much French in your part of the world? I presume Leslie down in
        > the swamp :-) there does...
        >
        >

        Actually I don't--as far as complete sentences or conversations are
        concerned. Quite a few Creole or Cajun words get somewhat anglicized then incorporated
        in daily speech.
        The older generation of Cajuns (Acadiens) were discouraged from speaking
        their own distinctive dialect when they went to school. Now the younger people,
        Cajun and Creoles, are pushing for a revival. There might be more young people
        who speak or understand Creole French in the black community of NO than there
        are aging Cajuns out in the swamps and small towns.



        Leslie


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      • JPKIRCHNER@aol.com
        ... people, ... people ... There used to be a short-wave radio station in New Orleans that had normal American call letters, and it did quite a bit of
        Message 3 of 7 , Jan 1, 2004
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          In a message dated 1/1/04 8:05:23 PM, Zemedelec@... writes:

          >The older generation of Cajuns (Acadiens) were discouraged from speaking
          >their own distinctive dialect when they went to school. Now the younger
          people,
          >Cajun and Creoles, are pushing for a revival. There might be more young
          people
          >who speak or understand Creole French in the black community of NO than
          >there are aging Cajuns out in the swamps and small towns.

          There used to be a short-wave radio station in New Orleans that had normal
          American call letters, and it did quite a bit of broadcasting in French, but the
          speech was more or less standard. Is that still on?

          Have you ever heard Rockin' Dopsey's creole rendition of Fats Domino's "I'm
          Walkin'"? Very fascinating for anyone interested in pidgins and creoles. It
          starts out, "Ma maché ... ma palé..." Some times I sing one of his other
          creole songs for the amusement of the West Africans in my classes.

          Jamie
        • Martina Silpoch
          ... Pretty close Melvy, but no cigar..or a shanty or whatever other concoctions you might enjoy ... town ... founded in 1854, serving the Bohemian immigrant
          Message 4 of 7 , Jan 2, 2004
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            --- In Czechlist@yahoogroups.com, "melvyn.geo" <zehrovak@d...> wrote:
            Pretty close Melvy, but no cigar..or a shanty or whatever other
            concoctions you might enjoy

            > I hear you have a Bohemia Hill there too.
            >Yes, we do, but not as famous as The Hill,meaning Italian part of
            town
            >
            > There is one thing though, that put St. Louis
            > > ahead of other US cities as far as Czech history is concerned.
            > > Should be a pretty easy one for you guys...

            > John Nepomuk Church, Eleventh St., St. Louis, MO. was
            founded in 1854, serving the "Bohemian" immigrant population. It
            claims the
            title of "First Czech Catholic Church in the United States".

            Those Czechs landed in New Orleans, only to find it nasty, humid,
            hot, uninhabitable, so they moved up Mississippi...only to end up in
            another humid, hot French town:) As long as they knew what they
            wanted...proti gustu zadnej disputat.

            > a) the first Sokol society in the New World was formed in St.
            Louis in 1865.
            >
            > b) the great Josephine Baker*, who was born and brought up in St.
            Louis, visited Prague for some time in the 1930s. I was reading
            about it recently in the memoirs of Otakar Storch-Marien.

            Here we may get into serious celebrity hunt...maybe some other
            time..
            > M.
            >
            > do you hear much French in your part of the world?
            Sorry, no French anymore, but go to Bohemian Hill to hear plenty of
            Bosnian, Croatian, Vietnamese, black whatever language it is (no
            offense)...and don't forget to keep your car doors locked!
            >

            M
          • Zemedelec@aol.com
            ... Not that I know of, but I just range around FM with occasional excursions into AM. On the weekend 90.7 has a program of Cajun and country music, with the
            Message 5 of 7 , Jan 2, 2004
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              In a message dated 1/1/04 23:46:32, JPKIRCHNER@... writes:


              > There used to be a short-wave radio station in New Orleans that had normal
              > American call letters, and it did quite a bit of broadcasting in French, but
              > the
              > speech was more or less standard.  Is that still on?
              >
              >
              >

              Not that I know of, but I just range around FM with occasional excursions
              into AM. On the weekend 90.7 has a program of Cajun and country music, with the
              DJ's comments in Cajun. Don't know if he's a native speaker; I can understand
              it from my college French.



              Leslie


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