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Re: [Czechlist] Re: Ulysses S. Grant

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  • Petr Veselý
    Hi folks, The Melvyn s U.S. Grant quiz was quite a success here and it showed that quite a few Czechlisters have competitive nature. So why not to repeat it on
    Message 1 of 36 , Jan 1, 2004
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      Hi folks,

      The Melvyn's U.S. Grant quiz was quite a success here and it showed that
      quite a few Czechlisters have competitive nature. So why not to repeat it on
      a more or less regular basis and make a sort of competition. Every now and
      then one of us could come up with a tricky thing related to English or
      Czech, either from the field of applied linguistics (simply some tricky
      language stuff) or a controversial problem connected with Czech / English
      history, culture or other areas.
      An example, in my previous e-mail I wrote:
      ...not mentioning letters with "hackami a carkami". I hope that those of you
      who read it noticed that it should be "s hacky a carkami". This time it was
      a deliberate mistake and I believe that similar tests (more sophisticated
      ones) could be both useful and enjoyable at the same time.
      As far as the prizes for future winners are concerned, we could see how
      Melvyn displayed his in-born generosity by giving two prizes instead of one
      so I suppose that he would be honoured to provide winners of this
      competition with nice (liquid) prizes too. :-)))

      Is it a stupid suggestion or is it woth trying?

      Regards,
      Petr
    • Joe Janecka
      ... Many thanks Gabriela, That is a wonderful explanation. I agree that the old, polite versions sound so much better. I ve always liked to use the
      Message 36 of 36 , Jan 4, 2004
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        On Sat, 3 Jan 2004 10:40:34 +0100, you wrote:


        >Hubicka is an old word, and polite. Not used today, but still has definitely
        >nothing in common with todays huba!! :-)
        >Some word has changed over last 50-100 years, one of them is holka (girl),
        >today most widely used, but in the 20´ only the lower cast used it (it
        >propably comes from holá), but every proper guy had a devce. So it seems
        >like common speech of later decades is being accepted as polite and polite
        >speech is slowly forgotten.
        >For this reason, the way some immigrants speak today (in Romania etc.) may
        >seem a little fit funny, but in fact, it is very nice that they kept their
        >native language and very good for them, because many people tend to forget
        >and it is no easy to keep two languages alive. :-)
        >I used to have relatives in Chicago/Berwyn, and they spoke Czech at home
        >until schoolmates of their boy laughed at him that he didnt know how to say
        >zinka/washrag in English.
        >Gabriela

        Many thanks Gabriela,

        That is a wonderful explanation. I agree that the old, polite
        versions sound so much better. I've always liked to use the
        expression "dej mi hubicku" rather than "dej mi pusu". It just sounds
        much more intimate. I was quite taken aback when told that 'dej mi
        hubicku' meant "kiss my snout". Now I can go back to using the old
        phrase and feel good about it. Also devce instead of holka. Much more
        intimate sounding.

        I am so glad you set me straight.

        Na Shledanou,
        Josef
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