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Re: [Czechlist] Hodne muziky za malo penez

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  • Petr Veselý
    Hi Jendo, if you don t need a special, sophisticated phrase, what about simply a good bargain ? Petr ... From: jenda222000 To:
    Message 1 of 21 , Nov 4, 2003
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      Hi Jendo,

      if you don't need a special, sophisticated phrase, what about simply "a good
      bargain"?
      Petr

      ----- Original Message -----
      From: "jenda222000" <jan_smejkal@...>
      To: <Czechlist@yahoogroups.com>
      Sent: Tuesday, November 04, 2003 10:41 AM
      Subject: [Czechlist] Hodne muziky za malo penez


      > Zdravim vespolek.
      > Nevedel by nekdo, jak nejlepe prelozit "Hodne muziky za malo penez"?
      > Diky za Vase napady
      > Jan Smejkal
      >
      >
      >
      > Visit the Czechlist Homepage at: http://www.bohemica.com/czechtranslation
      >
      > Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to http://docs.yahoo.com/info/terms/
      >
      >
      >
      >
    • melvyn.geo
      ... I was going to suggest this idea myself before I started looking (in vain) for something more traditional-sounding, and then I kinda got sidetracked... but
      Message 2 of 21 , Nov 5, 2003
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        --- In Czechlist@yahoogroups.com, JPKIRCHNER@a... wrote:
        >
        > In a message dated 11/4/03 4:43:22 AM, jan_smejkal@p... writes:
        >
        > > Nevedel by nekdo, jak nejlepe prelozit "Hodne muziky za malo penez"?
        > >
        > In the US we talk about getting "more bang for your buck". This probably
        > originated as meaning you get a bigger firecracker for a dollar. So, hodne
        > muziky za malo penez here would be getting a lot of bang for
        > your/their/our/his/her buck. I don't know if the British understand this idiom or not, since
        > they don't have "bucks" in their wallet,

        I was going to suggest this idea myself before I started looking (in vain) for something more traditional-sounding, and then I kinda got sidetracked...


        but sometimes they do understand and use
        > Americanisms that one wouldn't expect them to.

        I think most Brits are exposed to American influences from an early age. As a nipper in the 1960s I used to read Superman, Batman, Green Lantern and Spiderman (hated his aunt more than all the baddies), and to my teachers' great consternation, my classmates and I could imitate Huckleberry Hound, Yogi Bear and Boo-Boo, Snagglepuss, Top Cat and his alley-cat gang, the Addams Family and the Beverley Hillbillies long before we even attempted Received Pronunciation.

        M.
      • JPKIRCHNER@aol.com
        ... My favorite quote from Jed Clampet: I told her if you want to get into high society, go talk to Miz Drysdale. When it comes to high society, she s
        Message 3 of 21 , Nov 5, 2003
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          In a message dated 11/5/03 5:20:49 AM, zehrovak@... writes:

          > I think most Brits are exposed to American influences from an early age. As
          > a nipper in the 1960s I used to read Superman, Batman, Green Lantern and
          > Spiderman (hated his aunt more than all the baddies), and to my teachers' great
          > consternation, my classmates and I could imitate Huckleberry Hound, Yogi Bear
          > and Boo-Boo, Snagglepuss, Top Cat and his alley-cat gang, the Addams Family
          > and the Beverley Hillbillies
          >
          My favorite quote from Jed Clampet: "I told her if you want to get into
          high society, go talk to Miz Drysdale. When it comes to high society, she's
          always the first hog to the trough!"

          > long before we even attempted Received Pronunciation.
          >
          At exactly the same time, my friends and I were getting a kick out of
          Received Pronunciation we heard of TV, and were imitating it quite accurately to
          everyone's amusement.

          Jamie



          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        • vollams
          ... That s because we re heavily exposed to American culture from an early age, especially through television ( Zee is for zeebra - Sesame Street). I don t
          Message 4 of 21 , Nov 5, 2003
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            > > Nevedel by nekdo, jak nejlepe prelozit "Hodne muziky za malo penez"?
            > >
            > In the US we talk about getting "more bang for your buck".
            > This probably
            > originated as meaning you get a bigger firecracker for a
            > dollar. So, hodne
            > muziky za malo penez here would be getting a lot of bang for
            > your/their/our/his/her buck. I don't know if the British
            > understand this idiom or not, since
            > they don't have "bucks" in their wallet, but sometimes they
            > do understand and use
            > Americanisms that one wouldn't expect them to.

            That's because we're heavily exposed to American culture from an early
            age, especially through television ("Zee is for zeebra" - Sesame
            Street). I don't think many Brits would have much trouble understanding
            your suggestion, Jamie. But Petr's "a good bargain" is a good
            compromise.

            While surfing for alternatives I came across "more bolly for your
            lolly", which made me smile. "Bolly" is slang for Bollinger champagne,
            and lolly is slang for money. It's very obscure, though, so I'm not
            seriously suggesting using it.

            Simon
          • JPKIRCHNER@aol.com
            ... Then what am I to make of the words I used to see on British candy boxes in the supermarket in Marianske Lazne: 24 boiled sugar lollies . Sounded kind
            Message 5 of 21 , Nov 5, 2003
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              In a message dated 11/5/03 5:50:37 AM, vollams@... writes:

              > While surfing for alternatives I came across "more bolly for your
              > lolly", which made me smile. "Bolly" is slang for Bollinger champagne,
              > and lolly is slang for money. It's very obscure, though, so I'm not
              > seriously suggesting using it.
              >
              Then what am I to make of the words I used to see on British candy boxes in
              the supermarket in Marianske Lazne: "24 boiled sugar lollies". Sounded kind
              of nauseating! ;-)

              Jamie


              [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
            • melvyn.geo
              ... Well, what do you call the things that Kojak used to suck, if not lollies? BTW I hear that lolly in the slang sense of money comes from an Anglo-Romani
              Message 6 of 21 , Nov 5, 2003
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                --- In Czechlist@yahoogroups.com, JPKIRCHNER@a... wrote:
                >
                > In a message dated 11/5/03 5:50:37 AM, vollams@v... writes:
                >
                > > While surfing for alternatives I came across "more bolly for your
                > > lolly", which made me smile. "Bolly" is slang for Bollinger champagne,
                > > and lolly is slang for money. It's very obscure, though, so I'm not
                > > seriously suggesting using it.
                > >
                > Then what am I to make of the words I used to see on British candy boxes in
                > the supermarket in Marianske Lazne: "24 boiled sugar lollies". Sounded kind
                > of nauseating! ;-)
                >

                Well, what do you call the things that Kojak used to suck, if not lollies? BTW I hear that 'lolly' in the slang sense of money comes from an Anglo-Romani word 'loli' meaning 'red' (supposedly in reference to the colour of copper coins at one time). Not a lot of people know that.
                > >
                > My favorite quote from Jed Clampet: "I told her if you want to get into
                > high society, go talk to Miz Drysdale. When it comes to high society, she's
                > always the first hog to the trough!"

                Well, she sho' did speak purdier thuhn a ten-dollah ho'.

                > >
                > At exactly the same time, my friends and I were getting a kick out of
                > Received Pronunciation we heard of TV, and were imitating it quite accurately to
                > everyone's amusement.
                >

                The mind boggles. You are probably more "nicely spoken" (as RP speakers are perhaps sometimes still referred to up north) cos where I come from, man, one rarely if ever spoke RP on the street without gettin some heavy ass gangsta shit, brutha check it out, we are on it like boobonic, which we are, so it makes sense, so let’s get crackin on that shit na mean? No wait. Not the way you're thinking. the other way, no not that one either, yah, wait, ok, yeah, that one. Na mean? [With apologies to the author of ultrablognetic, check it out, na mean?]

                M.

                P.S. More splash for your cash? More nosh for your dosh? More whoopee for your rupee?
              • Matej Klimes
                ... your rupee? More bubbles for your rubles? That s if bubbles are used in E to coloquially refer to champagne - as they are in Czech - makes you think Czechs
                Message 7 of 21 , Nov 5, 2003
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                  >
                  > P.S. More splash for your cash? More nosh for your dosh? More whoopee for
                  your rupee?

                  More bubbles for your rubles?

                  That's if bubbles are used in E to coloquially refer to champagne - as they
                  are in Czech - makes you think Czechs are a nation of champagne-swigging,
                  cigar-chewing fat old bankers.... until you taste the stuff :)

                  M
                • JPKIRCHNER@aol.com
                  ... They re usually called suckers here. That s why when Bugs Bunny gets the best of Elmer Fudd, Elmer sometimes turns into a lollie to indicate he s a
                  Message 8 of 21 , Nov 5, 2003
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                    In a message dated 11/5/03 9:10:47 AM, zehrovak@... writes:

                    > Well, what do you call the things that Kojak used to suck, if not lollies?
                    >
                    They're usually called suckers here.

                    That's why when Bugs Bunny gets the best of Elmer Fudd, Elmer sometimes turns
                    into a "lollie" to indicate he's a sucker. That visual pun is most likely
                    as uninterpretable to foreigners as all those Czech cartoons of people entering
                    and leaving anuses.

                    <BLOCKQUOTE CITE STYLE="BORDER-LEFT: #0000ff 2px solid; MARGIN-LEFT> BTW I hear that 'lolly' in the slang sense of money comes from an
                    > Anglo-Romani word 'loli' meaning 'red' (supposedly in reference to the colour of
                    > copper coins at one time). Not a lot of people know that.
                    >
                    The Webster's New World and the Random House unabridged say that "lolly" was
                    a dialect word for tongue. It doesn't say which dialect.

                    > > My favorite quote from Jed Clampet:   "I told her if you want to get into
                    > > high society, go talk to Miz Drysdale.   When it comes to high society,
                    > she's
                    > > always the first hog to the trough!"
                    >
                    > Well, she sho' did speak purdier thuhn a ten-dollah ho'.
                    >
                    But she looked like she been rid hard an' put away wet.

                    > > At exactly the same time, my friends and I were getting a kick out of
                    > > Received Pronunciation we heard of TV, and were imitating it quite
                    > accurately to
                    > > everyone's amusement.
                    >
                    > The mind boggles. You are probably more "nicely spoken" (as RP speakers are
                    > perhaps sometimes still referred to up north) cos where I come from, man,
                    > one rarely if ever spoke RP on the street without gettin some heavy ass gangsta
                    > shit, brutha check it out, we are on it like boobonic, which we are, so it
                    > makes sense, so let’s get crackin on that shit na mean? No wait. Not the way
                    > you're thinking. the other way, no not that one either, yah, wait, ok, yeah,
                    > that one. Na mean? [With apologies to the author of ultrablognetic, check it
                    > out, na mean?]
                    >
                    > P.S. More splash for your cash?
                    >
                    Very good.

                    > More nosh for your dosh?
                    >
                    Isn't that spelled gnosh?

                    > More whoopee for your rupee?
                    >
                    This is the best one so far.

                    Jamie


                    [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                  • JPKIRCHNER@aol.com
                    ... The trouble is that bubbles has the vowel [^] in it, and not [u]. Doesn t rhyme, and if you changed the vowel in bubbles to [u], it sounds like
                    Message 9 of 21 , Nov 5, 2003
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                      In a message dated 11/5/03 9:52:49 AM, mklimes@... writes:

                      > More bubbles for your rubles?
                      >
                      > That's if bubbles are used in E to coloquially refer to champagne - as they
                      > are in Czech - makes you think Czechs are a nation of champagne-swigging,
                      > cigar-chewing fat old bankers.... until you taste the stuff :)
                      >
                      The trouble is that "bubbles" has the vowel [^] in it, and not [u]. Doesn't
                      rhyme, and if you changed the vowel in "bubbles" to [u], it sounds like
                      you're getting more boobies for your rubies, which is not a gender-neutral thing to
                      say.

                      Jamie


                      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                    • melvyn.geo
                      ... Ah, a sucker for me is a hemispherical rubber thingummijig that adheres to hard surfaces by suction, larger versions of which are used to unblock toilets.
                      Message 10 of 21 , Nov 5, 2003
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                        --- In Czechlist@yahoogroups.com, JPKIRCHNER@a... wrote:
                        >
                        > In a message dated 11/5/03 9:10:47 AM, zehrovak@d... writes:
                        >
                        > > Well, what do you call the things that Kojak used to suck, if not lollies?
                        > >
                        > They're usually called suckers here.

                        Ah, a sucker for me is a hemispherical rubber thingummijig that adheres to hard surfaces by suction, larger versions of which are used to unblock toilets.

                        I forgot to mention that "lolly" is short for lollipop. Now the person who sees schoolchildren safely across the road at zebra crossings carries a large lollipop-shaped sign and so is called a "lollipop man/woman". Do you have an equivalent?
                        >
                        > That's why when Bugs Bunny gets the best of Elmer Fudd, Elmer sometimes turns
                        > into a "lollie" to indicate he's a sucker.

                        I'd have just presumed this suggests he has been licked.

                        > But she looked like she been rid hard an' put away wet.

                        Can't say I entirely follow. Something to do with horses? Oh right, yes I see. Reminds me of the time a Czech girlfriend in the 1980s told me she found English women were often rather 'zubate' and 'kostnate' like horses. I got quite cross with her, actually.

                        >
                        > > More nosh for your dosh?
                        > >
                        > Isn't that spelled gnosh?

                        Only if you gnash your teeth while you nosh. :-)

                        American Heritage:

                        nosh
                        Informal n.

                        A snack or light meal.

                        intr.v. noshed, nosh·ing, nosh·es

                        To eat a snack or light meal: noshed on a bagel between classes.

                        [Yiddish nash, from nashn, to eat sweets,
                        nibble on, from Middle High German naschen, to nibble, from Old High German
                        hnascn. [so that's what Dick Dastardly's Muttley was speaking]


                        M.
                      • JPKIRCHNER@aol.com
                        ... That s a suction cup. ... That s a plunger. I used to enjoy having arguments with Czech teenagers at my school by pretending I thought the Czech plumbers
                        Message 11 of 21 , Nov 5, 2003
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                          In a message dated 11/5/03 2:12:11 PM, zehrovak@... writes:

                          > Ah, a sucker for me is a hemispherical rubber thingummijig that adheres to
                          > hard surfaces by suction,
                          >
                          That's a suction cup.

                          > larger versions of which are used to unblock toilets.
                          >
                          That's a plunger.

                          I used to enjoy having arguments with Czech teenagers at my school by
                          pretending I thought the Czech plumbers' union ran a large, diversified business
                          empire that was even in the hospitality and publishing industries. I claimed
                          that this is why every Czech town of any size has a hotel called Zvon, and that
                          there is also a Nakladatelstvi Zvon. I could keep a few of them going for
                          about 20 minutes trying to explain why I was mistaken.

                          > I forgot to mention that "lolly" is short for lollipop. Now the person who
                          > sees schoolchildren safely across the road at zebra crossings carries a large
                          > lollipop-shaped sign and so is called a "lollipop man/woman". Do you have an
                          > equivalent? 
                          >
                          Very boring. She's called a crossing-guard. There are also trained
                          children who do this. They are usually called safety patrol boys, or safety boys.
                          Some kids call them "duty boys". Now they are nearly all girls. I take
                          this as further disenfranchisement of boys at the primary school level.

                          > > That's why when Bugs Bunny gets the best of Elmer Fudd, Elmer sometimes
                          > turns
                          > > into a "lollie" to indicate he's a sucker.
                          >
                          > I'd have just presumed this suggests he has been licked.
                          >
                          That's TERRIFIC! I guess people make sense of those images one way or
                          another in their own culture. I'll have to remember that one and present it to an
                          anthropologist or someone.

                          > > But she looked like she been rid hard an' put away wet.
                          >
                          > Can't say I entirely follow. Something to do with horses? Oh right, yes I
                          > see. Reminds me of the time a Czech girlfriend in the 1980s told me she found
                          > English women were often rather 'zubate' and 'kostnate' like horses. I got
                          > quite cross with her, actually.
                          >
                          Once, while dining at the prakticka zkouzka at the hotel school, the Czech
                          teachers were discussing nations where the women are either astoundingly
                          beautiful or terribly ugly with no in-between. They put Sweden and the UK at the
                          top of their list. I guess it's a common belief, even here in the US.

                          Personally, I have a very easy time telling who is from the UK just by the
                          position of their lips. You can separate twins at birth, raise one in the US
                          and one in the UK, stand them next to each other, and from looking at their
                          lips, I'll be able to tell you which is which. I used this technique with more
                          than 80% accuracy on a plane from Detroit to London two years ago. When I
                          told my friends waiting at Gatwick, they woudn't believe me. They asked me to
                          show them the lip positions, and when I did, they just pooh-poohed the whole
                          idea.

                          Jamie
                          >

                          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                        • karenjsell
                          ... right, yes I see. Reminds me of the time a Czech girlfriend in the 1980s told me she found English women were often rather zubate and kostnate like
                          Message 12 of 21 , Nov 5, 2003
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                            >>But she looked like she been rid hard an' put away wet.

                            >>>Can't say I entirely follow. Something to do with horses? Oh
                            right, yes I see.
                            Reminds me of the time a Czech girlfriend in the 1980s told me she
                            found English
                            women were often rather 'zubate' and 'kostnate' like horses. I got
                            quite cross
                            with her, actually.

                            >>>> On the right track, if a horse runs hard and gets sweaty you are
                            supposed to cool the horse down and brush it before "putting it away"
                            or back in its stall. A hotwalker is the person whose job it is to
                            warm up and cool down fancy horses. Conversationally used it means
                            someone feels worn down and beaten up but it often also carries
                            sexual connotations. (Don't try to google it on a work computer - or
                            the porn police might come knocking) I had a co-worker who used
                            it, "we pulled an all-nighter to get the project done and by the time
                            we were done we felt rode hard and put away wet." Nervous silence
                            fell over the room.
                            Karen

                            --- In Czechlist@yahoogroups.com, "melvyn.geo" <zehrovak@d...> wrote:
                            > --- In Czechlist@yahoogroups.com, JPKIRCHNER@a... wrote:
                            > >
                            > > In a message dated 11/5/03 9:10:47 AM, zehrovak@d... writes:
                            > >
                            > > > Well, what do you call the things that Kojak used to suck, if
                            not lollies?
                            > > >
                            > > They're usually called suckers here.
                            >
                            > Ah, a sucker for me is a hemispherical rubber thingummijig that
                            adheres to hard surfaces by suction, larger versions of which are
                            used to unblock toilets.
                            >
                            > I forgot to mention that "lolly" is short for lollipop. Now the
                            person who sees schoolchildren safely across the road at zebra
                            crossings carries a large lollipop-shaped sign and so is called
                            a "lollipop man/woman". Do you have an equivalent?
                            > >
                            > > That's why when Bugs Bunny gets the best of Elmer Fudd, Elmer
                            sometimes turns
                            > > into a "lollie" to indicate he's a sucker.
                            >
                            > I'd have just presumed this suggests he has been licked.
                            >
                            > > But she looked like she been rid hard an' put away wet.
                            >
                            > Can't say I entirely follow. Something to do with horses? Oh right,
                            yes I see. Reminds me of the time a Czech girlfriend in the 1980s
                            told me she found English women were often rather 'zubate'
                            and 'kostnate' like horses. I got quite cross with her, actually.
                            >
                            > >
                            > > > More nosh for your dosh?
                            > > >
                            > > Isn't that spelled gnosh?
                            >
                            > Only if you gnash your teeth while you nosh. :-)
                            >
                            > American Heritage:
                            >
                            > nosh
                            > Informal n.
                            >
                            > A snack or light meal.
                            >
                            > intr.v. noshed, nosh·ing, nosh·es
                            >
                            > To eat a snack or light meal: noshed on a bagel between classes.
                            >
                            > [Yiddish nash, from nashn, to eat sweets,
                            > nibble on, from Middle High German naschen, to nibble, from Old
                            High German
                            > hnascn. [so that's what Dick Dastardly's Muttley was speaking]
                            >
                            >
                            M.
                          • JPKIRCHNER@aol.com
                            ... However, note that it s usually said with the dialect past tense rid , rather than rode , at least in my experience. Jamie [Non-text portions of this
                            Message 13 of 21 , Nov 5, 2003
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                              In a message dated 11/5/03 8:04:42 PM, karenjsell@... writes:

                              > "we pulled an all-nighter to get the project done and by the time
                              > we were done we felt rode hard and put away wet."
                              >
                              However, note that it's usually said with the dialect past tense "rid",
                              rather than "rode", at least in my experience.

                              Jamie


                              [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                            • raesim
                              ... But she was right, wasn t she? Czech women, on the other hand, tend to look like antelopes--high-cheeked with eyes widely spaced. Simon
                              Message 14 of 21 , Nov 6, 2003
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                                > Reminds me of the time a Czech girlfriend in the 1980s told me she
                                > found English women were often rather 'zubate' and 'kostnate' like
                                > horses. I got quite cross with her, actually.

                                But she was right, wasn't she? Czech women, on the other hand, tend
                                to look like antelopes--high-cheeked with eyes widely spaced.

                                Simon
                              • Zemedelec@aol.com
                                ... think. It s hard to resist the beauty of a fine Arabian, with the indented profile and great eyes that look as if they re circled with antimony. But
                                Message 15 of 21 , Nov 6, 2003
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                                  In a message dated 11/6/03 4:28:34, rachelandsimon@... writes:


                                  > Reminds me of the time a Czech girlfriend in the 1980s told me she
                                  > > found English women were often rather 'zubate' and 'kostnate' like
                                  > > horses. I got quite cross with her, actually.
                                  >
                                  > Whether you should have gotten cross depends on the horses she meant, I
                                  think. It's hard to resist the beauty of a fine Arabian, with the indented
                                  profile and great eyes that look as if they're circled with antimony. But then I
                                  just remembered, the original breeders of these horses, the Bedu tribesmen,
                                  often compared them to antelopes. So we come full circle...



                                  [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                                • melvyn.geo
                                  ... Isn t your view coloured a little by the fact that you used to live in Ascot? :-) I hear that people who live around horses tend to become a bit horsy
                                  Message 16 of 21 , Nov 7, 2003
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                                    >> Reminds me of the time a Czech girlfriend in the 1980s told me she >>found English women were often rather 'zubate' and 'kostnate' like
                                    >>horses.

                                    In a message dated 11/6/03 4:28:34, rachelandsimon@... writes:

                                    >But she was right, wasn't she?

                                    Isn't your view coloured a little by the fact that you used to live in Ascot? :-) I hear that people who live around horses tend to become a bit horsy themselves.

                                    > Zemedelec@... wrote:

                                    > It's hard to resist the beauty of a fine Arabian, with >the indented profile and great eyes that look as if >they're circled with antimony.

                                    A lovely description. Do you have any of your writing up on the net, Leslie?

                                    Melvyn
                                  • Zemedelec@aol.com
                                    ... Thank you. I have some up at http://hometown.aol.com/zemedelec/myhomepage/newsletter.html but some of it is years old, hence somewhat dated. [Non-text
                                    Message 17 of 21 , Nov 8, 2003
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                                      In a message dated 11/8/03 9:09:22, zehrovak@... writes:


                                      > A lovely description. Do you have any of your writing up on the net,
                                      > Leslie?
                                      >
                                      > Melvyn
                                      >
                                      >

                                      Thank you. I have some up at

                                      http://hometown.aol.com/zemedelec/myhomepage/newsletter.html

                                      but some of it is years old, hence somewhat dated.


                                      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                                    • melvyn.geo
                                      ... Heritage conservation is always topical and your article gives quite an insight into the attitude of some developers. Loved the descriptions of Prague.
                                      Message 18 of 21 , Nov 12, 2003
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                                        > In a message dated 11/8/03 9:09:22, zehrovak@d... writes:

                                        > > Do you have any of your writing up on the net?

                                        --- In Czechlist@yahoogroups.com, Zemedelec@a... wrote:

                                        > http://hometown.aol.com/zemedelec/myhomepage/newsletter.html
                                        >
                                        > but some of it is years old, hence somewhat dated.
                                        >
                                        >
                                        Heritage conservation is always topical and your article gives quite an insight into the attitude of some developers. Loved the descriptions of Prague. Very enjoyable.

                                        M.
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