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Re: [Czechlist] Re: Czechia revisited

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  • Mgr. Lenka Mandryszová
    I would not be that pessimistic. The biggest problem I see is the common confusion with Chechnya. L
    Message 1 of 24 , Oct 1, 2003
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      I would not be that pessimistic. The biggest problem I see is the common
      confusion with Chechnya.
      L


      > I would say naming countries is more often political process than we
      > may admit. It may be the fundamental issue from the "existential
      > point of view" - conquering the territory first, and naming it
      > follows second. Logic (or any kind of thinking at all) or linguistics
      > become possible after this. I think it is just sad when linguists
      > must PRETEND the opposite order. The same with Czechia.
      >
      > K.
      >
      >
      >
      > Visit the Czechlist Homepage at: http://www.bohemica.com/czechtranslation
      >
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      >
      >
      >
    • janvanek
      ... we ... Witness The Formal Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia - suddenly it seems we still didn t end up that badly :-) ... ... common ... Hm, how
      Message 2 of 24 , Oct 1, 2003
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        > > I would say naming countries is more often political process than
        we
        > > may admit.

        Witness The Formal Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia - suddenly it seems
        we still didn't end up that badly :-)


        --- In Czechlist@yahoogroups.com, Mgr. Lenka Mandryszová
        <iona@v...>
        wrote:
        > I would not be that pessimistic. The biggest problem I see is the
        common
        > confusion with Chechnya.

        Hm, how common? I read somewhere that "cech" was used as a nickname
        for Chechens in Russia so one would probably do better with "ne
        streljajte, ja cechoslovackij!" there, but I suppose there can't be
        so many people even in... um, outside Europe who'd think we had two
        wars with Russia in a decade and the capital levelled.
        Certainly the Slovakia/Slovenia confusion must be much more frequent,
        though perhaps a little bit less annoying.

        --
        Jan Vanek jr.

        malyctenar.blogspot.com - jak Randroidi prekladaji "late Mr. XY"?
      • Terminus Technicus
        ... YESS! That s my favourite :) (didn t know Korean cuisine was big on bear meat, though :) BTW, I don t mind Cesko at all, as long as it is used informally -
        Message 3 of 24 , May 18, 2004
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          > The last time I went to my favorite Korean restaurant in New York, their
          > bear menu featured "Pilsner (Czecho)."

          YESS! That's my favourite :)

          (didn't know Korean cuisine was big on bear meat, though :)

          BTW, I don't mind Cesko at all, as long as it is used informally - i.e. OK
          in a newspaper headline about the country as a physical entity (Cesko drzi
          rekord v piti piva etc.), less OK if it concerns the country as a political
          entity - za (Cesko byl pritomen premier Spidla), not OK in "Vyrobeno v
          Cesku" etc.. but I guess it'll get there one day

          I'm not sure about Czechia and don't know why it should be THE equivalent to
          Cesko, but if NS's say they prefer it to (for example) Czecho (which I admit
          is highly informal), then I'll live with it..



          People still bought it. :-) I think
          > the whole argument that we're seen as a country that doesn't know what to
          > call itself and thereby hurt its image reeks of pompous provincialism.

          Agree

          matej
        • Michal Ginter
          The last time I went to my favorite Korean restaurant in New York, their bear menu featured Pilsner (Czecho). People still bought it. :-) I think the whole
          Message 4 of 24 , May 18, 2004
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            The last time I went to my favorite Korean restaurant in New York, their
            bear menu featured "Pilsner (Czecho)." People still bought it. :-) I think
            the whole argument that we're seen as a country that doesn't know what to
            call itself and thereby hurt its image reeks of pompous provincialism. I
            suspect that the rest of the world doesn't really give a damn whether we
            call ourselves Czech Republic, the Czech Republic, Czechia, Czechlands or
            the Czechlands. Many countries have short and long versions of their name,
            and it doesn't seem to bother anyone. Perhaps the Senate could pass the
            referendum bill, and lump the question with the next referendum, maybe the
            one on the European constitution, let it become a res publica, and get a
            life.

            Michal
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