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Re: TERM: statim (is something very different!)

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  • karel6005
    ... Statim is an instruction to carry out a test urgently. See e.g. the explanation in the dictionary recommended by Helga:
    Message 1 of 4 , Aug 31, 2003
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      --- In Czechlist@yahoogroups.com, JPKIRCHNER@a... wrote:
      > "Statim" is evidently a type of stain test.

      "Statim" is an instruction to carry out a test urgently.

      See e.g. the explanation in the dictionary recommended by Helga:
      (http://www.maxdorf.cz/maxdorf/vls/):

      statim – lat. ihned. Oznaèuje vyšetøení požadovaná pøednostnì
      vzhledem k zdravotnímu stavu pacienta. Podobnì na receptu, srov.
      Cito!, Periculum in mora

      Cave! (& ave)

      Karel
    • JPKIRCHNER@aol.com
      ... Yes, in that usage it s equivalent to the English term stat (originally Latin), used in American hospitals. But this lekarsky slovnik is very
      Message 2 of 4 , Sep 1, 2003
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        In a message dated 9/1/03 3:23:27 AM, karel6005@... writes:

        > "Statim" is an instruction to carry out a test urgently.
        >
        Yes, in that usage it's equivalent to the English term "stat" (originally
        Latin), used in American hospitals. But this lekarsky slovnik is very
        incomplete and gave me some bad results, which is why I stopped using it.

        These "statim" tests were not carried out on an urgent basis, but were part
        of a battery of various tests done every one to two weeks, so the ordinary
        meaning of "stat" did not fit. There was nothing urgent about them, so I kept
        searching and found sites like this:

        http://216.109.117.135/search/cache?p=stat+statim+test&
        url=U9U1CuaopyIJ:www.volu-sol.com/images/PDF/INFO/Stat%2520Stain%2520Insert.%2520pdf.pdf

        "Stat and statim stains are modifications of classical Wright Giemsa and
        Wright stain respectively. The necessary buffer salts are combined in stain
        solutions, allowing as short as 20 seconds for staining time and the use of
        distilled or deionized water as buffer and rinse."

        This was the more likely meaning of the term in the context I was translating
        it in, and in that case it didn't need to be translated at all.

        Jamie


        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      • JPKIRCHNER@aol.com
        ... Yes, in that usage it s equivalent to the English term stat (originally Latin), used in American hospitals.  But this lekarsky slovnik is very
        Message 3 of 4 , Sep 2, 2003
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          In a message dated 9/1/03 3:23:27 AM, karel6005@... writes:


          > "Statim" is an instruction to carry out a test urgently.
          >
          >
          Yes, in that usage it's equivalent to the English term "stat" (originally
          Latin), used in American hospitals.  But this lekarsky slovnik is very incomplete
          and gave me some bad results, which is why I stopped using it.

          These "statim" tests were not carried out on an urgent basis, but were part
          of a battery of various tests done every one to two weeks, so the ordinary
          meaning of "stat" did not fit.  There was nothing urgent about them, so I kept
          searching and found sites like this:

          http://216.109.117.135/search/cache?p=stat+statim+test&
          url=U9U1CuaopyIJ:www.volu-sol.com/images/PDF/INFO/Stat%2520Stain%2520Insert.%2520pdf.pdf

          "Stat and statim stains are modifications of classical Wright Giemsa and
          Wright stain respectively.  The necessary buffer salts are combined in stain
          solutions, allowing as short as 20 seconds for staining time and the use of
          distilled or deionized water as buffer and rinse."

          Evidently they are called "statim" because you get the test results quickly.

          This was the more likely meaning of the term in the context I was translating
          it in, and in that case it didn't need to be translated at all.

          Jamie


          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
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