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Re: Help: abbreviation i.s.

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  • coilinoc
    ... when ... case ... his/her ... Hi there nameless person! Perhaps this is a UK/US usage difference? (or perhaps even a US/UK vs Irl. difference?) I have
    Message 1 of 8 , Aug 2, 2003
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      > Gentlemen,
      >
      > Though I've no doubt per pro or p.p. both have plenty of academic
      > credentials placing them in good standing with lawyers and
      > professors, the most common usage in the business world and in the
      > U.S. Government and the military is simply "for," particularly
      when
      > a signature block appears at the bottom of a document, in which
      case
      > the word is normally hand-written by the deputy signing for
      his/her
      > boss. If this isn't a question of a signature, then the
      > word "acting" is applicable, e.g., John Smith, Acting Director.
      >
      > Cheers!

      Hi there nameless person!
      Perhaps this is a UK/US usage difference? (or perhaps even a US/UK
      vs Irl. difference?) I have literally seen (and even received)
      scores of business/official letters etc. in English with p.p. or per
      pro written before the signature by the relevant person's
      secretary. You will also find both per pro and p.p. in the COED and
      other dictionaries (although considering the sort of documents I
      have seen from the sources you mention, these may be publications
      that the US Government, military, and indeed the business world in
      general, are not familiar with) :-)
      Best regards
      Coilin
    • kanadan2003
      ... per ... and ... Coiline, Jedna se pravdepodobne o rozdilne skusenosti. Nevim pro koho druhy kolega to preklada ale mate urcite pravdu, ze zadny prumerny
      Message 2 of 8 , Aug 2, 2003
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        > Hi there nameless person!
        > Perhaps this is a UK/US usage difference? (or perhaps even a US/UK
        > vs Irl. difference?) I have literally seen (and even received)
        > scores of business/official letters etc. in English with p.p. or
        per
        > pro written before the signature by the relevant person's
        > secretary. You will also find both per pro and p.p. in the COED
        and
        > other dictionaries (although considering the sort of documents I
        > have seen from the sources you mention, these may be publications
        > that the US Government, military, and indeed the business world in
        > general, are not familiar with) :-)
        > Best regards
        > Coilin

        Coiline,

        Jedna se pravdepodobne o rozdilne skusenosti. Nevim pro koho druhy
        kolega to preklada ale mate urcite pravdu, ze zadny prumerny
        american - at je to businessman nebo bigos - tomu nebude rozumet az
        tam uvidi zkratku p.p. bez ohledu na to jestli se to "skusenejsi"
        lidi najdou v jakemkoliv slovniku. ;-)

        Na zdravi
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