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Help: abbreviation i.s.

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  • coilinoc
    Hi can anyone tell me what the abbreviation i.s. at the end of a solicitor s letter means? I have a feeling it s probably something like per pro or v.z. but
    Message 1 of 8 , Jul 31, 2003
      Hi can anyone tell me what the abbreviation "i.s." at the end of a
      solicitor's letter means?
      I have a feeling it's probably something like per pro or v.z. but
      I'd just like to be sure
      MTIA
      Coilin
    • Jaroslav Hejzlar
      I am not sure at all, but I suppose it could stand for scient iuris or iuris scient , in Czech znalec prava . Jarda ... From: coilinoc To:
      Message 2 of 8 , Jul 31, 2003
        I am not sure at all, but I suppose it could stand for "scient iuris" or "iuris scient", in Czech "znalec prava".
        Jarda
        ----- Original Message -----
        From: coilinoc
        To: Czechlist@yahoogroups.com
        Sent: Thursday, July 31, 2003 11:16 PM
        Subject: [Czechlist] Help: abbreviation i.s.


        Hi can anyone tell me what the abbreviation "i.s." at the end of a
        solicitor's letter means?
        I have a feeling it's probably something like per pro or v.z. but
        I'd just like to be sure
        MTIA
        Coilin


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      • Jiri Jancik
        Good morning, when touching this issue, could any native speaker kindly explain what is actually the correct translation of v.z. (v zastoupeni - when a
        Message 3 of 8 , Aug 1, 2003
          Good morning,
          when touching this issue, could any native speaker kindly explain what is
          actually the correct translation of "v.z." (v zastoupeni - when a deputy
          signs a letter for the boss who is not present)
          Thanks

          Jiri Jancik

          ----- Original Message -----
          From: "coilinoc" <coilin@...>
          To: <Czechlist@yahoogroups.com>
          Sent: Thursday, July 31, 2003 9:16 PM
          Subject: [Czechlist] Help: abbreviation i.s.


          > Hi can anyone tell me what the abbreviation "i.s." at the end of a
          > solicitor's letter means?
          > I have a feeling it's probably something like per pro or v.z. but
          > I'd just like to be sure
          > MTIA
          > Coilin
          >
          >
          >
          > Visit the Czechlist Homepage at: http://www.bohemica.com/czechtranslation
          >
          > Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to http://docs.yahoo.com/info/terms/
          >
          >
        • coilinoc
          ... what is ... deputy ... I would normally go with per pro or p.p. (as in per procurationem). Just be careful to make sure the order is A per pro B whereby B
          Message 4 of 8 , Aug 1, 2003
            --- In Czechlist@yahoogroups.com, "Jiri Jancik" <jjancik@n...> wrote:
            > Good morning,
            > when touching this issue, could any native speaker kindly explain
            what is
            > actually the correct translation of "v.z." (v zastoupeni - when a
            deputy
            > signs a letter for the boss who is not present)
            > Thanks
            >
            > Jiri Jancik
            >
            I would normally go with per pro or p.p. (as in per procurationem).
            Just be careful to make sure the order is A per pro B whereby B is
            signing on behalf of A.
            HTH
            Coilin
            BTW thanks for the suggestion Jarda.
            iuris scient seems quite plausible given the context
          • Jiri Jancik
            Thank you Coilin Jiri Jancik
            Message 5 of 8 , Aug 1, 2003
              Thank you Coilin
              Jiri Jancik
            • kanadan2003
              ... explain ... a ... procurationem). ... Gentlemen, Though I ve no doubt per pro or p.p. both have plenty of academic credentials placing them in good
              Message 6 of 8 , Aug 2, 2003
                --- In Czechlist@yahoogroups.com, "coilinoc" <coilin@m...> wrote:
                > --- In Czechlist@yahoogroups.com, "Jiri Jancik" <jjancik@n...>
                wrote:
                > > Good morning,
                > > when touching this issue, could any native speaker kindly
                explain
                > what is
                > > actually the correct translation of "v.z." (v zastoupeni - when
                a
                > deputy
                > > signs a letter for the boss who is not present)
                > > Thanks
                > >
                > > Jiri Jancik
                > >
                > I would normally go with per pro or p.p. (as in per
                procurationem).
                > Just be careful to make sure the order is A per pro B whereby B is
                > signing on behalf of A.
                > HTH
                > Coilin
                > BTW thanks for the suggestion Jarda.
                > iuris scient seems quite plausible given the context

                Gentlemen,

                Though I've no doubt per pro or p.p. both have plenty of academic
                credentials placing them in good standing with lawyers and
                professors, the most common usage in the business world and in the
                U.S. Government and the military is simply "for," particularly when
                a signature block appears at the bottom of a document, in which case
                the word is normally hand-written by the deputy signing for his/her
                boss. If this isn't a question of a signature, then the
                word "acting" is applicable, e.g., John Smith, Acting Director.

                Cheers!
              • coilinoc
                ... when ... case ... his/her ... Hi there nameless person! Perhaps this is a UK/US usage difference? (or perhaps even a US/UK vs Irl. difference?) I have
                Message 7 of 8 , Aug 2, 2003
                  > Gentlemen,
                  >
                  > Though I've no doubt per pro or p.p. both have plenty of academic
                  > credentials placing them in good standing with lawyers and
                  > professors, the most common usage in the business world and in the
                  > U.S. Government and the military is simply "for," particularly
                  when
                  > a signature block appears at the bottom of a document, in which
                  case
                  > the word is normally hand-written by the deputy signing for
                  his/her
                  > boss. If this isn't a question of a signature, then the
                  > word "acting" is applicable, e.g., John Smith, Acting Director.
                  >
                  > Cheers!

                  Hi there nameless person!
                  Perhaps this is a UK/US usage difference? (or perhaps even a US/UK
                  vs Irl. difference?) I have literally seen (and even received)
                  scores of business/official letters etc. in English with p.p. or per
                  pro written before the signature by the relevant person's
                  secretary. You will also find both per pro and p.p. in the COED and
                  other dictionaries (although considering the sort of documents I
                  have seen from the sources you mention, these may be publications
                  that the US Government, military, and indeed the business world in
                  general, are not familiar with) :-)
                  Best regards
                  Coilin
                • kanadan2003
                  ... per ... and ... Coiline, Jedna se pravdepodobne o rozdilne skusenosti. Nevim pro koho druhy kolega to preklada ale mate urcite pravdu, ze zadny prumerny
                  Message 8 of 8 , Aug 2, 2003
                    > Hi there nameless person!
                    > Perhaps this is a UK/US usage difference? (or perhaps even a US/UK
                    > vs Irl. difference?) I have literally seen (and even received)
                    > scores of business/official letters etc. in English with p.p. or
                    per
                    > pro written before the signature by the relevant person's
                    > secretary. You will also find both per pro and p.p. in the COED
                    and
                    > other dictionaries (although considering the sort of documents I
                    > have seen from the sources you mention, these may be publications
                    > that the US Government, military, and indeed the business world in
                    > general, are not familiar with) :-)
                    > Best regards
                    > Coilin

                    Coiline,

                    Jedna se pravdepodobne o rozdilne skusenosti. Nevim pro koho druhy
                    kolega to preklada ale mate urcite pravdu, ze zadny prumerny
                    american - at je to businessman nebo bigos - tomu nebude rozumet az
                    tam uvidi zkratku p.p. bez ohledu na to jestli se to "skusenejsi"
                    lidi najdou v jakemkoliv slovniku. ;-)

                    Na zdravi
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