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Fw: tranfree 17 - Commercial Idleness

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  • Tomáš Skřont
    I just thought that some of you may be interested in the below text from tranfree web page I ve just received in my e-mail. Apart from useless things and web
    Message 1 of 1 , Aug 1, 2000
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      I just thought that some of you may be interested in the below text from
      tranfree web page I ve just received in my e-mail. Apart from useless things
      and web promotions, you may read a wonderful article about translating
      advertisings and also a few very good translation jokes. Here is the sample:

      GREECE
      In a hotel in Athens:
      Visitors are expected to complain at the office between the hours
      of 9 and 11 A.M. daily.

      Have a nice day,

      *******************************************************************
      Ing. Tomas SKRONT
      cheap, quick and reliable freelance Czech<>English translator

      Kurzova 12/2224, 155 00 Prague 5, Czech Rep.
      Tel/Fax: +420 2 56 156 77
      Mobile phone: + 420 602 712 923
      www.dtk.cz/tomasskront

      It's nice to be important, but it's much more important to be nice!

      ******************************************************************

      ----- Original Message -----
      From: Tranfree <tranfree@...>
      To: <tranfree@...>
      Sent: Monday, July 31, 2000 9:10 PM
      Subject: tranfree 17 - Commercial Idleness


      >
      > tranfree issue 17 - 1st August 2000
      >
      > ISSN 1470-3866
      >
      > Please feel free to forward a copy of tranfree to as many
      > friends, colleagues and discussion lists you know that might be
      > interested (NOT to Usenet newsgroups please - this annoys
      > people!)
      >
      > If you ever need to unsubscribe, just send an email to:
      > mailto:tranfree@... containing the word
      > "REMOVE" in the body text of the email. Please do not just hit
      > the reply button, or you will be sent a copy of this message
      > automatically.
      > ***
      >
      >
      > Welcome to issue 17 of tranfree - the free ezine for translators.
      >
      > tranfree is formatted for fixed-width fonts. If you are reading
      > it using email software that uses proportional fonts, some of the
      > formatting may look a little odd. Change to Courier or System
      > fonts for best results :)
      > ***
      >
      >
      > How's Your Summer?
      > ******************
      >
      > I hope you are all enjoying a nice summer. I'm in Poland at the
      > moment staying with Malgorzata's relatives. It's a change of
      > scenery rather than a holiday. Unfortunately the weather's been
      > pretty bad for summer. The nice thing is, on days when we don't
      > want to work, we just switch off the mobile phone (stress
      > machine) - and then WE'RE CLOSED!
      >
      > Yes it's possible that we'll lose a job or two like this, but you
      > can't work 365 days of the year. It's very tempting to not have
      > proper breaks when the money starts rolling in. But you are a
      > walking disaster waiting to happen if you don't!
      >
      > What we tend to do is carry on working, but scrupulously avoid
      > stressful and difficult jobs and a heavy workload.
      >
      > If you are going to be available for work, the important thing to
      > do is tell all your main clients before you go. Also give them
      > your contact number(s). We're here for a month, so it would be
      > a dangerously long time to close down the business.
      > ---
      >
      > We had some great feedback about the PowerPoint article in last
      > month's edition. Many people wrote in with their agreement about
      > not accepting work in PowerPoint or charging by the hour for it.
      >
      > One translator wrote in to say that she had virtually built her
      > entire business around PowerPoint work for a large multinational.
      > In this case she charges a fixed cost per slide, which became
      > more and more profitable as she got better and better at
      > PowerPoint -- to the extent that she now earns much more per hour
      > working on PowerPoint than any other activity.
      >
      > This was a direct client situation, which is great if you have
      > the time to develop these types of relationships. The downside of
      > direct clients is that it's harder to take a holiday. They can be
      > less forgiving than the agencies! But if you develop the right
      > relationships anything is possible :)
      >
      > Have a good summer and don't work too hard!
      >
      >
      >
      > Alex Eames, tranfree editor, translatortips.com founder
      > Author - How to Earn $80,000+ per Year as a Freelance Translator
      > Further information available at
      > http://www.translatortips.com/ht50.html
      > http://www.translatortips.net/ht50.html
      >
      >
      > This month's tranfree contains:
      > *******************************
      >
      > * Letter of the Month
      > * Commercial Translation - by Irina Budzivula/Alex Eames
      > * Linkers Prize Draw
      > * A Lonely Business - by John McCarthy
      > * Translation Joke of the Month
      >
      >
      >
      > Letter of the Month
      > *******************
      >
      > Alex,
      >
      > I must say that without your help and great info I would
      > have never been able to do what I am doing and do so well. It
      > all seems to work like magic. Now maybe I need to get some
      > people to translate for me. It's been 4 months since I started
      > from scratch and I can not believe it. All the best and
      > thanks again.
      >
      > Hasta pronto
      > Cora M
      >
      > Thanks Cora - it's always great to get good feedback! :)
      > Cora has actually bought and used all four of the products that
      > we currently offer...
      >
      > eBook How to Earn $80,000+ per Year as a Freelance Translator
      > http://www.translatortips.com/ht50.html
      >
      > tranmail - system for applying for work by email at 1400
      > translation agencies around the world (soon to be 1700)
      > http://www.translatortips.com/tranmail.html
      >
      > Reputable Translation Agencies
      > http://www.translation-agencies.com/reputag.html
      >
      > Radek Pletka Weekly job List
      > http://www.translation-agencies.com/radek.html
      >
      >
      > Alex Eames, tranfree editor
      > ***
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      > =================================================================
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      > ---------------------------------------
      > Translation is moving to the Web and we invite you to move with
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      >
      > Save $500
      > ------------
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      > for an unbelievable price of $495 exclusively when you register
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      >
      > Take advantage of this offer - visit www.TranslationZone.com now!
      > =================================================================
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      > Commercial Translation
      > **********************
      >
      > By Irina Budzivula
      >
      >
      > I would like to share some amusing observations I made watching
      > commercials on Russian and Ukrainian TV channels. The mechanical
      > transfer of Western commercials into a different language
      > environment often results in a "brick dropped onto the heads of
      > potential consumers". Here are a few examples. The "Wash and Go"
      > shampoo commercial may work alright for native speakers of
      > English, but for the Russian (Ukrainian) ear the word "wash"
      > sounds like Russian word "vosh" that means louse -- the worst
      > possible association that the commercial of a hair-care product
      > may create in the minds of the potential buyers!
      >
      > Cosmetic company "Avon" is operating through a network of
      > distributors who call themselves consultants. I do not know what
      > "Avon" sales figures for Russia are, but I bet they would be much
      > higher if the company invested in language training of its
      > consultants so that they should be no longer tempted to treat the
      > word "Avon" as a Russian word and pronounce it as "a:von". "Von"
      > in Russian means "get lost" or "get out of here". Even though
      > unintentional, a "get lost" message from a salesperson is not
      > conducive to good sales. What's worse, it makes you suspicious as
      > to how competent their consultants are to advise you on the
      > cosmetic products that are labelled in English.
      >
      > Another example of an advertising lapse is the commercial for
      > "Blue water" mineral water. "Blue water" sounds like Ukrainian
      > word "bluvota "or "vomit" Again this is the last thing that a
      > consumer of a beverage should make a connection with.
      >
      > The Gillette commercial in Ukrainian is the most harmless and
      > just strikes one as being funny. "Zshilet" in Ukrainian is a
      > "waistcoat", so subconsciously that is what a Ukrainian speaker
      > is expecting to see -- a "zshilet" or a "waistcoat". Only the
      > close-up of a shaving male leaves no doubt as to what is being
      > advertised here.
      >
      > It's not all that bad though. The producers of "More" cigarettes
      > have hit the jackpot with this name - as far as Russia and
      > Ukraine are concerned. And if I go further with the lottery
      > analogy, I would say they simply bought the lottery ticket (they
      > gave the name to the product) without bothering to fill it out
      > (there was no advertising in Ukraine at least none I am aware
      > of). With few exceptions almost all the letters are read in
      > Russian and Ukrainian words, so Russian/Ukrainian smokers do not
      > ask for English "More"(mo:), but for Ukrainian "More" (all the
      > four letters are pronounced), meaning "sea". And unless it is
      > this understandable name or rather an easy connection the local
      > smokers make with the Ukrainian "more" -"sea" that is
      > contributing to the popularity of this brand, what is it then?
      > Just luck, pure and simple? The kind of luck you need to hit the
      > jackpot?
      >
      > It's interesting to note that the "Blue water" commercial very
      > soon disappeared from the TV screens; Gillette is now very
      > distinctly pronounced as "dzshilet", the initial D is probably
      > aimed at distinguishing English Gillette from Ukrainian
      > "zshilet", while the "Wash and Go" commercial is still running
      > with "Wash" still sounding like "vosh"-"louse".
      >
      > I have very nice hair. Is it because I have always been
      > distrustful of the "VOSH" shampoos and preferred the vitamins in
      > Pantene Pro-V? "Avon" claims to have good shampoos too and I
      > might be talked into buying one, provided next time I am
      > approached by their consultant he gets the name of the company
      > right.
      >
      > Irina Budzivula, translator Russian & Ukrainian
      > ---
      >
      > Thank you for some amusing observations Irina. The moral of the
      > story? When translating advertising or publication texts you
      > have to be VERY VERY CAREFUL. You should also insist that the
      > client has everything checked out by their local representatives
      > in-country. In many cases they will not have local
      > representatives. Does this mean you should accept all liability?
      > No. Absolutely not. You should disclaim it with every ounce of
      > your strength!
      >
      > In some cases we are persuaded into doing jobs we don't really
      > want (see tranfree 13 for an article about this
      > http://www.translatortips.com/tranfreethirteen.html ) and don't
      > feel qualified to do well enough. We always issue what we call a
      > "health warning" when submitting the job.
      >
      > A typical health warning might look something like this...
      >
      > "Please note that if this material is for publication, we
      > strongly recommend that it is proof-read for local
      > terminology and suitability in the destination country by
      > the client's local representatives. This is extremely
      > important and we cannot accept responsibility for the
      > consequences if it is not done."
      >
      > Best of all would be to avoid the job in the first place. This is
      > not always possible, since sometimes even your best clients
      > under-estimate the job's difficulty level. Some clients even
      > mislead you accidentally (or deliberately - perish the thought!)
      > into thinking that "it's just a couple of pages - shouldn't take
      > long!"
      >
      > The trouble is, that it's quite hard once you've verbally
      > accepted the job to then phone back and turn it down -
      > particularly with a good client (particularly if they email it to
      > you on Friday afternoon and it's due for Monday morning and you
      > don't get it until they've gone home and you've got no home
      > contact number for them). The answer is to do it as well as you
      > can and issue a health warning. Then you can sleep more easily
      > and the responsibility falls to the client to make sure that it
      > is suitable.
      >
      > But I'm ABSOLUTELY NOT suggesting that you make a habit of
      > disclaiming responsibility for your work. Only use this technique
      > when you're forced to do a job you wouldn't normally take! If you
      > try to disclaim all responsibility for all of your work, clients
      > will assume you are doing it because you don't trust your own
      > quality.
      >
      > In most circumstances you will be able to reject the jobs which
      > you don't feel qualified to do. You should reject them and not be
      > greedy, or you may live to regret it!
      >
      > _________________________________________________________________
      >
      > Alex Eames is the founder of translatortips.com,
      > editor of tranfree and author of the eBook...
      >
      > How to Earn $80,000+ Per Year as a Freelance Translator
      >
      > http://www.translatortips.com/ht50.html
      > _________________________________________________________________
      >
      >
      >
      >
      > translatortips.com Linkers FREE Prize Draw
      > ******************************************
      >
      > I am keen to get as many of you as possible who have your own web
      > sites to link to the translatortips.com web site. To encourage
      > you all to put a link to translatortips.com on your own site, I
      > am holding a monthly prize draw for everyone who does this. Each
      > month all those people who have put a link on their own web site
      > to the translatortips.com site (and let me know about it) will go
      > into a ballot and the winner gets a FREE translatortips.com
      > product of their choice from the following:
      >
      > * My ebook - How to Earn $80,000+ per Year as a Freelance
      > Translator (American and British English versions available)
      > http://www.translatortips.com/ht50.html
      >
      > * tranmail - database of 1400 translation agencies around the
      > world, with email addresses and a booklet about marketing
      > yourself by email
      > http://www.translatortips.com/tranmail.html
      >
      > This month's winner is Helen Floropoulos - please contact me
      > to claim your prize from the above selection.
      >
      > If you wish to put a link to the translatortips.com site on your
      > site you can find instructions at the bottom of this edition.
      > ***
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      > =================================================================
      > Did you know that the tongue of a blue whale is as long as an
      > elephant? In 1958, IBM forecast a world market for only 5
      > computers. Alexander Graham Bell never telephoned his wife or
      > mother! Translate interesting didyouknow stories into your home
      > language. Get 50% commission now plus stock options in future.
      > See the didyouknow.com Language Affiliate Programme at
      > http://www.didyouknow.com/affiliates.htm
      > =================================================================
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      > A Lonely Business
      > *****************
      >
      > By John McCarthy
      >
      > It's a cliché, but translating is a lonely business. Most of us
      > know how hard it can be to sit down and begin work - and how
      > easily we can find an excuse for getting up and interrupting that
      > work. There seems to be some perverse law operating which makes
      > all the minor chores of our lives take on an aspect of vital
      > importance the nearer we get to deadlines.
      >
      > As the days run out our homes become cleaner and tidier, long
      > forgotten electrical appliances are enthusiastically repaired,
      > our kids' bikes oiled and polished. On the eve of deadline day we
      > find ourselves hunched, red-eyed and guilty, darning needle in
      > hand, over an ancient pair of socks. Or, perhaps in a pathetic
      > attempt to assuage our guilt by doing something work-related, we
      > pore over a beginner's Russian or Portuguese. We've been meaning
      > to add another language to our repertoire for years. What better
      > time than the present - when there's absolutely no time left!
      >
      > All those activities we engage in as alternatives to work are, of
      > course, thoroughly commendable. We'd have nothing to reproach
      > ourselves for and have no cause to dread the disapproval of
      > partners were it not for one inescapable fact: walking the cat
      > and fixing the electric can opener and pumping up the kids' tyres
      > tend, on the whole, to be entirely unprofitable endeavours.
      >
      > Ironically, perhaps, it is not those translators who are
      > industrious or lucky enough to have a constant stream of work
      > flopping heavily on to the mat or whizzing urgently to them
      > through cyberspace who are most prone to this kind of
      > procrastination. Such people tend, after a leisurely read of the
      > paper or invigorating morning jog through the park, to sit down
      > perfectly contentedly to begin the day's work. The reassuring
      > murmur of Radio 4 or the soothing strains of Sibelius may be
      > perceptible in the background as the enviably busy translator
      > gently coaxes themself into remembering exactly where he left off
      > yesterday. This translator is the epitome of nonchalance. Another
      > day, another dollar. No big deal. Isn't it like this for
      > everyone?
      >
      > Well, no. The problem with not having work to do is that there is
      > this constant gnawing feeling that it is basically your fault.
      > You haven't done enough, or whatever it is you have done you
      > haven't done right. That's a big world out there, full of
      > thousands of businesses and millions of documents that need to be
      > translated.
      >
      > How come, then, you have to write a hundred begging letters
      > and make fifty fawning phone calls to get a thousand words on
      > something you hate?
      >
      > Then you have to write another five letters and make as many
      > phone calls and spend sleepless nights riddled with self-doubt
      > before you are grudgingly paid, three months later, your fifty
      > quid (~$80 US).
      >
      > You know that dream, where you're eighteen again, have failed
      > your exams and messed up everything forever? That's what not
      > getting enough translation work is like. But if you're one of
      > those who is doing all the right things and getting the work, you
      > probably don't know what I'm talking about and probably never
      > have that kind of dream.
      >
      > You might assume that a translator with little or very irregular
      > work would inevitably hurry off to his desk at the slightest nod
      > from a client. But this is not necessarily the case. He might
      > equally be so lacking in routine because of the sporadic nature
      > of his work that he finds it a great effort to start the shortest
      > job.
      >
      > Perhaps there is a deeper motive for his reticence in getting
      > started. If he has at least one job waiting to be done he can
      > enjoy fantasising about what it is like to have a backlog of
      > work. His pride, too, may play a part. Why should he scurry to
      > pick up the few crumbs being thrown him? He knows it is only a
      > matter of time before that $50,000 job comes his way.
      >
      > Money provides a good analogy here, as it does for most things.
      > Next time you're in a bar, look at the people who are most free
      > with it. It is generally those who have no idea where their next
      > few pennies are coming from. The precariousness of their
      > existence instils in them a desperate sort of recklessness, a
      > refusal to be beaten by their terrifying situation.
      >
      > They should be saving every penny that comes their way. It might
      > mean the difference between survival and starvation. But no, it
      > is the middle class professional with the steady income and
      > insurance policies who sits soberly with the sensible small beer.
      > He understands that the only way to maintain and increase his
      > wealth is through constant vigilance and steely self-discipline.
      >
      > The point is that to have an efficient, regulated working routine
      > it helps to have regular work. When you know there is always
      > something to be done you can plan your days, your weeks, your
      > life around your work.
      >
      > A scenario: It's midday and you've been at your desk for three
      > hours, You've translated two thousand words and your eyes are
      > beginning to feel a little sore. Now's a good time to fix your
      > son's brakes or clean the kitchen floor. You could do with a bit
      > of physical exercise, and it will give you an appetite for lunch.
      >
      > While you're eating, you catch up with the news on the radio (a
      > translator has to keep abreast of events). Then it's a nap.
      > Nothing excessive, just twenty minutes or so. But that's one of
      > the plusses of being a freelance - you don't have to pretend
      > you're not tired when you are.
      >
      > Back to work in the afternoon, another two or three thousand
      > words, then out for a run, or swimming pool with the kids, or
      > your favourite TV show. Tomorrow the same or very similar. It's
      > an altogether pleasant way of working - where you can be yourself
      > to an extent that is hardly possible in the employed arena.
      >
      > And that's the way it's going to be for you some day. Just as
      > soon as you get yourself properly organized to tell all those
      > potential clients just how well you do what you do. Perhaps the
      > first thing is to value your own time. Make a start now: forget
      > the ironing and rearranging your bookshelves, and get on with
      > that translation!
      >
      >
      > _________________________________________________________________
      > John McCarthy lives in North London and translates/interprets
      > from Spanish. He has also lectured in Translation at two London
      > universities. He also writes reviews, articles and fiction.
      > _________________________________________________________________
      >
      >
      > Coming in the next edition of tranfree...
      >
      > LIKE SANDS THROUGH THE HOURGLASS,
      > So Are the Minutes of a Translator's Time:
      > Time Management Tips for the Freelance Translator
      > by Mary Maloof
      >
      >
      >
      >
      > =================================================================
      > Want to know the Perfect Price for your translations?
      >
      > Want to create a web site that sells your translation services?
      >
      > Visit...
      >
      > http://www.sitesell.com/tt.html
      >
      > =================================================================
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      > Translation Joke of the Month
      > *****************************
      >
      > More foreign travel funnies...
      >
      > GREECE
      > In a hotel in Athens:
      > Visitors are expected to complain at the office between the hours
      > of 9 and 11 A.M. daily.
      >
      > In a Rhodes tailor shop:
      > Order your summers suit. Because is big rush we will execute
      > customers in strict rotation.
      >
      > Christian Faucheux runs META the spiritual linguist newsletter
      > which contains a lot of language and translation related jokes
      > http://www.all-languages.com/bulletin.html
      >
      >
      > I saw both of these gems in Zaragoza in Spain:
      >
      > On a kiosk notice board - jacked potatoes
      >
      > In a Chinese restaurant where the menu was translated into
      > English - chicken with much room (didn't fancy that one!)
      >
      > Mandie Donaldson
      >
      >
      > -----------------------------------------------------------------
      > Aquarius.net, serving the online translation community since
      > 1995. Visit us at http://aquarius.net to find 12,000+ translators
      > and 2000+ agencies, classified ads, forums, monthly magazine,
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      >
      > ***
      >
      >
      > ***End of issue 17***
      >
      > issue 18 will be out in September 2000
      > if the recruitment process generates a lot of good
      > contributors you may get the next edition sooner!
      >
      >
      > For all those of you who have subscribed in the last couple of
      > months I would strongly recommend you visit the tranfree archive
      > at http://www.translatortips.com where previous tranfree
      > issues are available. There's loads of great FREE information
      > there which many of you will not have seen yet.
      >
      > Please forward a copy of this entire newsletter to all your
      > friends/ colleagues/ mailing lists, who would be interested.
      >
      > ***
      >
      > If you have any questions or articles for inclusion in future
      > editions of tranfree, or any suggested topics you would like to
      > see, please email them to me at:
      >
      > mailto:editor@...
      > ***
      >
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      > mailto:links@...
      >
      > Be sure to include the URL of the actual page containing the
      > link. Then you'll go into a FREE monthly draw for as long as you
      > keep the link on your site.
      > ===End of File===
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
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