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Re: [Czechlist] term: listen BBC, wait on a call

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  • Matej Klimes
    I don t think Waiting ON a call is nespisovne or Black English, just another way of saying it, implying that the call is important and that the waiting is the
    Message 1 of 6 , Mar 27, 2003
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      I don't think Waiting ON a call is nespisovne or Black English, just another
      way of saying it, implying that the call is important and that the waiting
      is the only thing the person does, rather than I'm doing other things while
      I'm waiting for something........

      I think it appears in one of Rolling Stones' song - good old Mickie might be
      trying to sound black there, but I wouldn't limit it just to Black speakers
      (in BrE)...

      M

      BTW: V cestine taky "cekame hovor", ale nekdy "cekame NA dulezity hovor".



      ----- Original Message -----
      From: <JPKIRCHNER@...>
      To: <Czechlist@yahoogroups.com>
      Sent: Thursday, March 27, 2003 4:31 AM
      Subject: Re: [Czechlist] term: listen BBC, wait on a call


      > Another thing your students should know is that many things that native
      > English speakers say daily without noticing may sound very irritating and
      > "wrong" if they are said with a foreign accent. So your students had
      better
      > keep their English as "spisovne" as possible.
      >
      > I was a walking example of that phenomenon in Marianske Lazne. If I used
      a
      > word like "kram" instead of "obchod", or "knobloch" instead of "cesnek", I
      > was emphatically corrected by people who used those words themselves. I
      > often got chided for using a "nespisovny vyraz" by people who could not
      tell
      > me the "spisovny" one when I asked for it.
      >
      > The biggest thing that annoyed people was that I had picked up the West
      > Bohemian failure to distinguish between "mi" and "me". I wrote them
      > correctly, but the difference was not in my speech, so, like all the
      people
      > around me, I said things like, "Ten pan mi videl." I was often corrected
      for
      > this, and on one typical occasion some lady told me it was a HORRIBLE
      > nespisovne habit that some people (not she) had, and that I should stop
      doing
      > it. She then proceeded to use "mi" for the accusative unconsciously about
      > five or six times in the next few seconds.
      >
      > So, just because native speakers say something doesn't mean native
      speakers
      > won't hate your students' speech if they say the same thing.
      >
      > Jamie
      >
      >
      > Czechlist archive: http://groups.yahoo.com/group/Czechlist
      >
      > Czechlist resources:
      > http://www.geocities.com/Athens/Forum/7953/Intro.html
      >
      > Post message: Czechlist@yahoogroups.com
      >
      > Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to http://docs.yahoo.com/info/terms/
      >
    • JPKIRCHNER@aol.com
      ... I don t think people on our side of the Atlantic get this difference. This is evidently a dialect difference. It may be that waiting on was normal here
      Message 2 of 6 , Mar 27, 2003
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        In a message dated 3/27/03 3:56:25 AM, mklimes@... writes:

        >I don't think Waiting ON a call is nespisovne or Black English, just another
        >way of saying it, implying that the call is important and that the waiting
        >is the only thing the person does, rather than I'm doing other things while
        >I'm waiting for something........

        I don't think people on our side of the Atlantic get this difference. This
        is evidently a dialect difference. It may be that "waiting on" was normal
        here before the 19th century and grammarians then tried to purge it, along
        with the other things they decided were wrong, such as "you is".

        >I think it appears in one of Rolling Stones' song - good old Mickie might be
        >trying to sound black there, but I wouldn't limit it just to Black speakers
        >(in BrE)...

        I don't think black speakers of BrE have their own dialects, do they? Here
        they do, and "waiting on" is one element of it. Again, there's evidently a
        US-UK difference I didn't know about.

        Jamie
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