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Capital letters

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  • Tony Long
    So, I think there may be different taste in sign wording on the two sides of the ocean. Thank you for sharing that with us, Jamie. Perhaps there are some
    Message 1 of 5 , Mar 4 12:50 AM
      'So, I think there may be different taste in sign wording on the two sides
      of
      the ocean.'

      Thank you for sharing that with us, Jamie. Perhaps there are some
      differences in the language as well.

      On a more (or less) serious level, there are profound differences in
      approaches to humour as well. For example, the British transport system has
      been a complete mess for so long that 'out of service' is routine. Succinct
      little signs went out of fashion long ago and many transport information
      boards (is signboard a legitimate term for 'notice'? Who uses it?) now
      feature bitter little parodies of the politically correct garbage that
      festoons so much of public life these days. Thus, what confirms Jamie's
      prejudice merely elicits a small smile from the Brits it is aimed at.

      Similarly, cartoon fashion in the UK, especially in the so-called
      'intelligent' press, is moving in much the same direction. The wordiness is
      intentional and contains its own 'in-crowd' humour' to which only the
      'initiated' - the T's target readers, mainly Brit, for all the pink one's
      exposure in the US, respond. I don't find it very funny, either, but then I
      don't read the FT for the funnies or its style. It's worth noting that one
      of the most prestigious Brit cartoon awards recently went to a Spectator
      regular whose speciality is re-captioning, or 'speech-bubbling', very retro
      pix with amusingly verbose modern comments. Much the same could be said of
      many Brit advertisements, which tend to be far less 'in your face' than
      American ones and far more self-referentially humorous.

      As has been pointed out countless times on the list, context is all. And
      although it shouldn't need to be pointed out, context includes country of
      origin, regardless of the translator's/interpreter's personal feelings about
      it.


      I remain, as ever, your most obedient and humble servant

      Tony
    • Tony Long
      Jamie wrote: I understand from foreigners here that in the far west of the US (states I ve never been to) many people are so phony that they actually invite
      Message 2 of 5 , Mar 4 11:33 PM
        Jamie wrote:

        'I understand from foreigners here that in the far west of the US (states
        I've never been to) many people are so phony that they actually invite you
        to their homes and
        then are shocked when you are so foolish as to show up.'

        Glad you weren't subjected to the classic Brit 'We really must have dinner
        together sometime' or the 'Drop in if you're round our way' which mean, if
        anything, the very opposite and occasion a barrage of nervous excuses if
        acted upon.

        When teaching in Holland (journalism), I chaired several discussions on
        national stereotyping and racism. In the course of events it emerged that,
        from a Dutch point of view, making promises you have no intention whatsoever
        of keeping was a distinctly British characteristic, up near the top of the
        list, together with lack of precision in workmanship, every class....

        Mark you, in their KLM directness, they weren't particularly kind to anyone.

        Best

        Tony
      • JPKIRCHNER@aol.com
        ... The book Culture Shock Germany says that many Germans claim not to trust Americans or East Asians, because they say one thing superficially and then turn
        Message 3 of 5 , Mar 5 4:00 AM
          In a message dated 3/5/03 2:38:12 AM, tonylong@... writes:


          > When teaching in Holland (journalism), I chaired several discussions on
          > national stereotyping and racism. In the course of events it emerged that,
          > from a Dutch point of view, making promises you have no intention
          > whatsoever
          > of keeping was a distinctly British characteristic, up near the top of the
          > list, together with lack of precision in workmanship, every class....
          >
          The book Culture Shock Germany says that many Germans claim not to trust
          Americans or East Asians, because they say one thing superficially and then
          turn out to mean something else. I would counter that Germans are your best
          friend in the world if they have a few beers in them, but they turn cold and
          steely once the alcohol wears off.

          Jamie


          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        • Mgr. Lenka Mandryszová
          I may be completely wrong, but to me an obligation in a contract is a definite, explicit clause (more in the sense of povinnost contrary to rights arising
          Message 4 of 5 , Oct 1, 2003
            I may be completely wrong, but to me an obligation in a contract is a
            definite, explicit clause (more in the sense of "povinnost" contrary to
            rights arising from a contract), whereas liability is more implicit (I think
            I could even say XY is "liable" to a specific "obligation", therefore XY has
            the liability arising from some obligation).
            This is rather a clumsy explanation, I admit.
            Lenka
            P.S. I also capitalize in Czech translation.


            ----- Original Message -----
            From: "Zuzana Koèièková" <zuzana.kocickova@...>
            To: <Czechlist@yahoogroups.com>
            Sent: Thursday, October 02, 2003 8:16 PM
            Subject: [Czechlist] Capital letters


            > Thank you for all responses. I usually do not capilize in Czech
            transaltions, however some customers require it.
            >
            > Obligation x liability - I also use the first one in contracts and the
            second for accounting issues. But sometimes they stand one by one - ...
            obligations and liabilities of a party... Then I have a fun.
            >
            > Zuzka
            >
            > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
            >
            >
            >
            > Visit the Czechlist Homepage at: http://www.bohemica.com/czechtranslation
            >
            > Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to http://docs.yahoo.com/info/terms/
            >
            >
            >
          • Zuzana Kočičková
            Thank you for all responses. I usually do not capilize in Czech transaltions, however some customers require it. Obligation x liability - I also use the first
            Message 5 of 5 , Oct 2, 2003
              Thank you for all responses. I usually do not capilize in Czech transaltions, however some customers require it.

              Obligation x liability - I also use the first one in contracts and the second for accounting issues. But sometimes they stand one by one - ... obligations and liabilities of a party... Then I have a fun.

              Zuzka

              [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
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