Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.
 

Re: [Czechlist] Re: Some more dastardly culinary items

Expand Messages
  • Pecinkova - preklady
    Hi guys, no, Matej is right. Tagliatelle are definitely not anything like tasticky . These would be ravioli - they really look like tasticky . Then there
    Message 1 of 25 , Mar 4, 2003
      Hi guys,
      no, Matej is right. Tagliatelle are definitely not anything like "tasticky".
      These would be "ravioli" - they really look like "tasticky". Then there are
      also "tortellini", which is kind of a similar thing but different shape -
      they are rolled and formed into small rings.
      Iveta

      From: Martin Janda <martinjanda@...>
      To: <Czechlist@yahoogroups.com>
      Sent: Tuesday, March 04, 2003 8:30 AM
      Subject: Re: [Czechlist] Re: Some more dastardly culinary items


      > Coilin, sorry for making troubles while you are comfortable with what
      > proposed, but I am afraid tagliatelle is what you would call "tasticky" in
      > Czech or maybe (very little) pies in English and thus far from being the
      > nest-like balls that Matej was right to mention.
      >
      > I can't recall having seen the "nests" with any Italian food - but I saw
      > them selling in my favorite supermarket as "Chinese rice noodles".
      >
      >
      > ----- Original Message -----
      > From: <coilin@...>
      > To: <Czechlist@yahoogroups.com>
      > Sent: Tuesday, March 04, 2003 3:17 AM
      > Subject: [Czechlist] Re: Some more dastardly culinary items
      >
      >
      > > --- In Czechlist@yahoogroups.com, "Matej Klimes" <mklimes@m...>
      > > wrote:
      > > > Hi Coilin,
      > > >
      > > >
      > > > >
      > > >
      > > > TESTOVINOVYMI HNIZDY - too lazy to go up and look up the Italian
      > > name, but
      > > > they are the flat pasta that comes in nest-like balls in the
      > > packet (is it
      > > > Tagliatele??)
      > > >
      > > Thanks Matej,
      > > Tagliatelle is indeed the man I am looking for :-)
      > > Best regards
      > > Coilin
      > >
      > >
      > > Czechlist archive: http://groups.yahoo.com/group/Czechlist
      > >
      > > Czechlist resources:
      > > http://www.geocities.com/Athens/Forum/7953/Intro.html
      > >
      > > Post message: Czechlist@yahoogroups.com
      > >
      > > Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to
      http://docs.yahoo.com/info/terms/
      > >
      > >
      > >
      > >
      >
      >
      >
      > Czechlist archive: http://groups.yahoo.com/group/Czechlist
      >
      > Czechlist resources:
      > http://www.geocities.com/Athens/Forum/7953/Intro.html
      >
      > Post message: Czechlist@yahoogroups.com
      >
      > Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to http://docs.yahoo.com/info/terms/
      >
    • Dohnalová Kateřina
      Hello, I think the testovinova hnizda are pasta nests, as it really looks like bird nests when served. It would be string like pasta such as spaghetti for
      Message 2 of 25 , Mar 4, 2003
        Hello,
        I think the testovinova hnizda are pasta nests, as it really looks like bird
        nests when served.
        It would be string like pasta such as spaghetti for example.

        K.

        -----Original Message-----
        From: coilin_oconnor <coilin@...> [mailto:coilin@...]
        Sent: Tuesday, March 04, 2003 2:07 AM
        To: Czechlist@yahoogroups.com
        Subject: [Czechlist] Some more dastardly culinary items


        I was just wondering what any local foodies who might still be awake
        would make of the following:

        Tournedos s cesnekovou omackou podavane s TESTOVINOVYMI HNIZDY
        (clusters of pasta????)

        Grilovane jehneci HREBINKY na cesneku (comb-shaped cuts of lamb???)

        Any suggestions would be gratefully received.

        Best regards
        Coilin



        Czechlist archive: http://groups.yahoo.com/group/Czechlist

        Czechlist resources:
        http://www.geocities.com/Athens/Forum/7953/Intro.html

        Post message: Czechlist@yahoogroups.com

        Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to http://docs.yahoo.com/info/terms/
      • Simon Vollam
        Hi Jamie, ... top (I think). OTT means over the top , as you yourself wrote. Judging by some of your recent postings, you must have had a hard time
        Message 3 of 25 , Mar 4, 2003
          Hi Jamie,

          >> OK maybe it's a little OTT,

          > A little what?

          > I can easily see something similar to that, but your example is over the
          top
          (I think).

          OTT means "over the top", as you yourself wrote. Judging by some of your
          recent postings, you must have had a hard time understanding what was going
          on during your recent UK trip :-)


          > "Sorry, but I'm not picking up passengers right now,"

          This is a fairly new development. I reckon it's the British service
          industry's rather warped take on the US approach. The British tend to think
          that all shop assistants/waiters in the USA use platitudes like "Have a nice
          day!" or "Enjoy your meal!" (but do they in reality?). So the bus company
          has decided to come up with one of its own, however silly it might be.


          > Some of the advertising slogans in the tube were also very, very long and
          therefore not very memorable

          Bear in mind that the long-suffering British public often spend a very, very
          long time waiting for public transport, so they have plenty of time to
          memorise the adverts. Some of these things can even be quite diverting, if
          you forget to bring any other reading matter with you.

          The other day I was watching a Canadian TV travel documentary on London.
          Very informative. I learnt, for example, that "England is a democratic
          country with a parliament".

          Simon
        • Matej Klimes
          ... think ... nice ... They definitely do - to the point of annoyance (to me then) until I taught myself to ignore it the same way I had to teach myself not to
          Message 4 of 25 , Mar 4, 2003
            >
            > This is a fairly new development. I reckon it's the British service
            > industry's rather warped take on the US approach. The British tend to
            think
            > that all shop assistants/waiters in the USA use platitudes like "Have a
            nice
            > day!" or "Enjoy your meal!" (but do they in reality?).

            They definitely do - to the point of annoyance (to me then) until I taught
            myself to ignore it the same way I had to teach myself not to reply (really
            reply) when someone asks me "How are you".... I found both of these things
            (constant, but somewhat "artificial" attention and "fake" concern over your
            conterpart's well-being) a bit annoying when I first got to US, I still do,
            but I tolerate it now - it's the way they do things, I don't agree with it
            but they don't mean wrong, at least within the context....

            And before Jamie and others descend on me with rigteous anger :)

            I'm not trying to tell Americans what to do or criticizing them, just
            pointing out an observation I made at one point......

            Sure, the Czech shop assistants and other people whose job it is to make you
            happy being at the best slightly annoyed with your request certainly arent
            better, but I found some American clerks, shop attendants, etc. just as
            annoyed at having to serve me in the middle of the night at a Safeway,
            except they had a big smile on their face and said their sweet ...and how
            are you today.. through slightly gritting teeth. It used to get to me and I
            though: "We both know you're not happy and I don't look exactly cheerful at
            this time of the morning, so let's get on with our lives without having to
            pretend we love each other.." I do like people being nice to me, but it
            doesn't have to go OTT. Of course that in 99% of cases Americans really mean
            it, at least in their own way and lots of people over there, unlike Czechs,
            are very friendly "at first encounter" - only sometimes they don't know you
            half an hour later or next day, again, generalizing...

            Have a nice day!

            M
          • JPKIRCHNER@aol.com
            ... she had never met as a chip off the old block , the block being herself, and the chip being the girl she had never met. She did this because they both
            Message 5 of 25 , Mar 4, 2003
              In a message dated 3/4/03 7:17:02 AM, vollams@... writes:


              > OTT means "over the top", as you yourself wrote. Judging by some of your
              > recent postings, you must have had a hard time understanding what was going
              > on during your recent UK trip :-)
              >
              > I especially had trouble when a girl from Manchester referred to someone
              she had never met as "a chip off the old block", the block being herself, and
              the chip being the girl she had never met. She did this because they both
              had the same idea about something. I always thought that, for you to be a
              chip off the old block, the block had to be one of your parents. Very
              confusing.

              >
              > > "Sorry, but I'm not picking up passengers right now,"
              >
              > This is a fairly new development. I reckon it's the British service
              > industry's rather warped take on the US approach. The British tend to think
              > that all shop assistants/waiters in the USA use platitudes like "Have a
              > nice
              > day!" or "Enjoy your meal!" (but do they in reality?). So the bus company
              > has decided to come up with one of its own, however silly it might be.
              >
              Yes, the Americans in service businesses really DO use those platitudes, at
              least verbally. When I went to a restaurant for the first time after moving
              home from the CR, I asked my friends about the waitress, "Why does she keep
              singing to us?!" My friends hadn't noticed anything odd about her speech.

              I much prefer the type of service you get on Dutch airlines, where the staff
              are warm and do not seem to be using a "technique" on you. Here in the US,
              you usually feel service workers are techniquing you to death.

              >
              > > Some of the advertising slogans in the tube were also very, very long and
              > therefore not very memorable
              >
              > Bear in mind that the long-suffering British public often spend a very,
              > very
              > long time waiting for public transport, so they have plenty of time to
              > memorise the adverts. Some of these things can even be quite diverting, if
              > you forget to bring any other reading matter with you.
              >
              I figured there had to be a reason why they could get away with long slogans
              like that.

              I was also impressed that there were posters in the stations for BOOKS!
              People there READ!

              > The other day I was watching a Canadian TV travel documentary on London.
              > Very informative. I learnt, for example, that "England is a democratic
              > country with a parliament".
              >
              Not every democratic country has a parliamentary system.

              Jamie


              [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
            • JPKIRCHNER@aol.com
              ... I don t think the US is the only place where the equivalent of Jak se mate? is meaningless. When teaching from British ESL books in the UK, I was
              Message 6 of 25 , Mar 4, 2003
                In a message dated 3/4/03 8:14:30 AM, mklimes@... writes:


                > They definitely do - to the point of annoyance (to me then) until I taught
                > myself to ignore it the same way I had to teach myself not to reply (really
                > reply) when someone asks me "How are you".... I found both of these things
                > (constant, but somewhat "artificial" attention and "fake" concern over your
                > conterpart's well-being) a bit annoying when I first got to US, I still do,
                > but I tolerate it now - it's the way they do things, I don't agree with it
                > but they don't mean wrong, at least within the context....
                >
                I don't think the US is the only place where the equivalent of "Jak se mate?"
                is meaningless. When teaching from British ESL books in the UK, I was
                startled to find out that the expected answer to "How do you do?" was "How do
                you do?" No answer to the question was ever given! I understand from
                foreigners here that in the far west of the US (states I've never been to)
                many people are so phony that they actually invite you to their homes and
                then are shocked when you are so foolish as to show up.

                Foreigners here also get confused by "see you later", which is surprising to
                me, because "auf Wiedersehen", "a rivederci", "hasta la vista", "la revedere"
                and "na shledanou" all basically mean "see you later".

                > And before Jamie and others descend on me with rigteous anger :)
                >
                > I'm not trying to tell Americans what to do or criticizing them, just
                > pointing out an observation I made at one point......
                >
                > Sure, the Czech shop assistants and other people whose job it is to make
                > you
                > happy being at the best slightly annoyed with your request certainly arent
                > better, but I found some American clerks, shop attendants, etc. just as
                > annoyed at having to serve me in the middle of the night at a Safeway,
                > except they had a big smile on their face and said their sweet ...and how
                > are you today.. through slightly gritting teeth.
                >
                > Since I've been back from the CR, I tell people that I prefer grumpy
                competence over cheerful mediocrity any day.

                Jamie
                >

                [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
              • Simon Vollam
                ... People there READ! Well, they read posters. ... I don t think that was the point the guy was trying to make. He was standing in front of Big Ben, after
                Message 7 of 25 , Mar 4, 2003
                  > I was also impressed that there were posters in the stations for BOOKS!
                  People there READ!

                  Well, they read posters.

                  > Not every democratic country has a parliamentary system.

                  I don't think that was the point the guy was trying to make. He was standing
                  in front of Big Ben, after all. Maybe I should have added a comma after
                  "country" - the emphasis was certainly on the word "democratic".

                  I was also amused when he said "the city of Bath, near London". It might be
                  near by Canadian standards, but to the average Briton sitting in a traffic
                  jam on the M4/M25 interchange it can seem a very long way indeed.

                  S.
                • JPKIRCHNER@aol.com
                  ... Yeah, but for us Big Ben is just a huge clock. I m not even positive what that building was that it was attached to. I assume the parliament, but no one
                  Message 8 of 25 , Mar 4, 2003
                    In a message dated 3/4/2003 2:55:53 PM Eastern Standard Time, "Simon Vollam" <vollams@...> writes:

                    >> Not every democratic country has a parliamentary system.
                    >
                    >I don't think that was the point the guy was trying to make. He was standing
                    >in front of Big Ben, after all.

                    Yeah, but for us Big Ben is just a huge clock. I'm not even positive what that building was that it was attached to. I assume the parliament, but no one has ever explicitly told me. Ask me how the tone system in Chinese arose in prehistory, and I can explain that. Ask me if Big Ben and the Tower of London are the same thing, and I can't tell you for sure.

                    >Maybe I should have added a comma after
                    >"country" - the emphasis was certainly on the word "democratic".

                    I suppose there are some people in the world who think that the queen rules the UK. Good to make it clear to those who don't know.

                    >I was also amused when he said "the city of Bath, near London". It might be
                    >near by Canadian standards, but to the average Briton sitting in a traffic
                    >jam on the M4/M25 interchange it can seem a very long way indeed.

                    Well, there are those Europeans who think that if you're from Minnesota you can just drop in on their cousin in California. Don't forget also that there are people in the UK, as well as in North America, who think that there is a country called Czechoslovakia and a nationality and language called Czechoslovakian. A German recently described to me his image of life in the Czech Republic, saying that Americans are more likely to feel comfortable there than Germans are, because "you are already used to all that murder." It took me a couple days to realize that he didn't know the difference between society in Russia and in the rest of Eastern Europe.

                    So, there are dopes everywhere who need things explained to them.

                    Jamie
                  Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.