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TERM: valentudinarian

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  • Jirka Bolech
    Hi there, What is the current American usage of the word valentudinarian as hinted on near the bottom of http://www.litgothic.com/Texts/mr_humphries.html
    Message 1 of 5 , Mar 17, 2002
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      Hi there,

      What is the "current American usage" of the word
      "valentudinarian" as hinted on near the bottom of
      http://www.litgothic.com/Texts/mr_humphries.html (item 1 in
      the list of Notes and References)?

      Jirka Bolech
    • JPKIRCHNER@aol.com
      ... The current American usage is that no one has ever heard the word or knows what the heck it means. It is completely absent from my Random House unabridged
      Message 2 of 5 , Mar 17, 2002
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        In a message dated 3/17/02 3:03:43 PM, jirkabolech@... writes:

        >What is the "current American usage" of the word
        >"valentudinarian" as hinted on near the bottom of
        >http://www.litgothic.com/Texts/mr_humphries.html (item 1 in
        >the list of Notes and References)?

        The current American usage is that no one has ever heard the word or knows
        what the heck it means. It is completely absent from my Random House
        unabridged dictionary, so I guess there isn't any current American usage.
        Unless someone proves me wrong.

        Jamie
      • melvyn.geo
        ... knows ... House ... usage. ... Ciao, I presume this valentudinarian is meant to be an amusing country-bumpkin mispronunciation of valetudinarian (as it
        Message 3 of 5 , Mar 17, 2002
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          --- In Czechlist@y..., JPKIRCHNER@a... wrote:
          >
          > In a message dated 3/17/02 3:03:43 PM, jirkabolech@y... writes:
          >
          > >What is the "current American usage" of the word
          > >"valentudinarian" as hinted on near the bottom of
          > >http://www.litgothic.com/Texts/mr_humphries.html (item 1 in
          > >the list of Notes and References)?
          >
          > The current American usage is that no one has ever heard the word or
          knows
          > what the heck it means. It is completely absent from my Random
          House
          > unabridged dictionary, so I guess there isn't any current American
          usage.
          > Unless someone proves me wrong.
          >
          > Jamie

          Ciao,

          I presume this 'valentudinarian' is meant to be an amusing
          country-bumpkin mispronunciation of 'valetudinarian' (as it is
          correctly spelt in the footnote). Don't know if the word has gained
          any special connotations in recent years but here is one dictionary
          definition that I found:


          valetudinarian \val-uh-too-din-AIR-ee-un; -tyoo-\, noun:
          A weak or sickly person, especially one morbidly concerned with his
          or her health.

          adjective:
          Of or relating to or characteristic of a person who is a
          valetudinarian; sickly; weak; infirm.

          [H]e is the querulous bedridden valetudinarian complaining of
          his asthma or his hay fever,
          remarking with characteristic hyperbole that "every speck of
          dust suffocates me."
          --Oliver Conant, review of Marcel Proust, Selected Letters:
          Volume Two, 1904-1909,
          edited by Philip Kolb, translated by Terrence Kilmartin, New
          York Times, December 17,
          1989

          She affected to be spunky about her ailments and afflictions,
          but she was in fact an utterly
          self-centered valetudinarian.
          --Louis Auchincloss

          My feeble health and valetudinarian stomach.
          --Coleridge



          Valetudinarian derives from Latin valetudinarius, "sickly; an
          invalid," from valetudo, meaning "state
          of health," "good health," or "ill health," from valere, "to be
          strong or well."
        • JPKIRCHNER@aol.com
          ... Now I have a term for some of the lazenske hosty I had so much daily contact with when I lived in the CR. Jamie
          Message 4 of 5 , Mar 17, 2002
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            In a message dated 3/17/02 7:49:28 PM, zehrovak@... writes:

            >especially one morbidly concerned with his
            >or her health.

            Now I have a term for some of the lazenske hosty I had so much daily contact
            with when I lived in the CR.

            Jamie
          • metzke@rocketmail.com
            Odd that I came across this while trying to find a definition for the word, a consequence of having just read the M.R. James story noted! For what it is worth,
            Message 5 of 5 , Mar 24, 2013
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              Odd that I came across this while trying to find a definition for the word, a consequence of having just read the M.R. James story noted!

              For what it is worth, there is a rock song of that title - "Valentudinarian," i.e. with letter 'n' in the fifth position as in the James story - recorded and (apparently self-) released by a group named Mystery Pills; it can be played at this address:
              http://www.last.fm/music/Mystery+Pills/Mystery+Pills

              Now if anybody has any ability to understand lyrics to rock songs when sung - I don't, my thing is opera and I have enough trouble with that! - perhaps listening to the song might give or imply a definition. Short of that I have to presume that James was using a word archaic in his own time (he loved to do that!) and long since gone from modern references. Anybody have the OED unabridged?





              --- In Czechlist@yahoogroups.com, "melvyn.geo" <zehrovak@...> wrote:
              >
              > --- In Czechlist@y..., JPKIRCHNER@a... wrote:
              > >
              > > In a message dated 3/17/02 3:03:43 PM, jirkabolech@y... writes:
              > >
              > > >What is the "current American usage" of the word
              > > >"valentudinarian" as hinted on near the bottom of
              > > >http://www.litgothic.com/Texts/mr_humphries.html (item 1 in
              > > >the list of Notes and References)?
              > >
              > > The current American usage is that no one has ever heard the word or
              > knows
              > > what the heck it means. It is completely absent from my Random
              > House
              > > unabridged dictionary, so I guess there isn't any current American
              > usage.
              > > Unless someone proves me wrong.
              > >
              > > Jamie
              >
              > Ciao,
              >
              > I presume this 'valentudinarian' is meant to be an amusing
              > country-bumpkin mispronunciation of 'valetudinarian' (as it is
              > correctly spelt in the footnote). Don't know if the word has gained
              > any special connotations in recent years but here is one dictionary
              > definition that I found:
              >
              >
              > valetudinarian \val-uh-too-din-AIR-ee-un; -tyoo-\, noun:
              > A weak or sickly person, especially one morbidly concerned with his
              > or her health.
              >
              > adjective:
              > Of or relating to or characteristic of a person who is a
              > valetudinarian; sickly; weak; infirm.
              >
              > [H]e is the querulous bedridden valetudinarian complaining of
              > his asthma or his hay fever,
              > remarking with characteristic hyperbole that "every speck of
              > dust suffocates me."
              > --Oliver Conant, review of Marcel Proust, Selected Letters:
              > Volume Two, 1904-1909,
              > edited by Philip Kolb, translated by Terrence Kilmartin, New
              > York Times, December 17,
              > 1989
              >
              > She affected to be spunky about her ailments and afflictions,
              > but she was in fact an utterly
              > self-centered valetudinarian.
              > --Louis Auchincloss
              >
              > My feeble health and valetudinarian stomach.
              > --Coleridge
              >
              >
              >
              > Valetudinarian derives from Latin valetudinarius, "sickly; an
              > invalid," from valetudo, meaning "state
              > of health," "good health," or "ill health," from valere, "to be
              > strong or well."
              >
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